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1) Cluster Rumba Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Data at the ESA Cluster Science Archive maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VSPO/NumericalData/Cluster-Rumba/EDI/CSA/PT0.0625S
Start:2001-01-30 00:00:00 Observatory:Cluster FM5 (Rumba) Cadence:0.0625 seconds
Stop:2016-09-14 07:59:49 Instrument:Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Resource:NumericalData
The Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) data products from the Cluster spacecraft in three main categories: (1) Electron enegergies measured between 0.5 and 1.0 keV for the Windshield Wiper mode: time series of the three components of the electron drift velocity and of the three components of the electric field in Cartesian GSE coordinate system (corrected for spacecraft motion) with different qualities and time resolution at 1-4 sec (PP, PPP, MPD); (2) Ambient electron measurements at fixed enegeris of 0.5 or 1.0 keV: time series of electron counts normally at 16 ms for the three pitch angles 0 deg, 90 deg, 180 deg, the detector look direction in the spacecraft frame and in GSE and the status for AE mode; and (3) Overview plot of the main parameters for both modes for every 3 h for one reference spacecraft (usually Cluster III). Besides the main products, there also are raw data and auxiliary data. Raw data consist of merged science files (MSF) that are obtained by merging the housekeeping and science (burst (BM) and normal (NM) mode) telemetry files. They are in binary format. Auxiliary are either data used internally by the main data production software or data dedicated to intercalibration or time-interval lists of the EDI operation modes. For more details, see "The Cluster Active Archive: Studying the Earth's Space Plasma Environment", edited by Dr. Harri Laakso, Matthew G. T. T. Taylor, C. Philippe Escoubet, from which this information was obtained.

2) Cluster II Rumba Prime Parameter Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Data maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VMO/NumericalData/Cluster-Rumba/EDI/PrimeParameter/4S
Start:2000-12-09 00:00:00 Observatory:Cluster FM5 (Rumba) Cadence:4 seconds
Stop:2016-09-14 07:58:16 Instrument:Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Resource:NumericalData
This instrument (EDI: Electron Drift Instrument) measures the drift of a weak beam of test electrons that, when emitted in certain directions, return to the spacecraft after one gyration. This drift is related to the electric field and the gradient in the magnetic field, and these quantities can, by the use of different electron energies, be determined separately. The fundamental time step to determine the new parameters and direct the beams and the detectors is 2 ms. Inter-experiment links include: magnetic field information from FGM and STAFF, a blanking pulse received from WHISPER to warn of possible interference from that active experiment, and a similar blanking pulse sent to PEACE when the EDI electron beam could interfere with the PEACE electron measurement. For more details of the Cluster mission, the spacecraft, and its instruments, see the report Cluster: mission, payload and supporting activities, March 1993, ESA SP-1159, and the included article The Electron Drift Instrument for Cluster, by G. Paschmann et al., from which this information was obtained.

3) Cluster II Salsa Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Data at the ESA Cluster Science Archive maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VSPO/NumericalData/Cluster-Salsa/EDI/CSA/PT0.016S
Start:2001-01-30 00:00:00 Observatory:Cluster FM6 (Salsa) Cadence:0.016 seconds
Stop:2016-09-14 08:00:04 Instrument:Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Resource:NumericalData
The Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) data products from the Cluster spacecraft in three main categories: (1) Electron enegergies measured between 0.5 and 1.0 keV for the Windshield Wiper mode: time series of the three components of the electron drift velocity and of the three components of the electric field in Cartesian GSE coordinate system (corrected for spacecraft motion) with different qualities and time resolution at 1-4 sec (PP, PPP, MPD); (2) Ambient electron measurements at fixed enegeris of 0.5 or 1.0 keV: time series of electron counts normally at 16 ms for the three pitch angles 0 deg, 90 deg, 180 deg, the detector look direction in the spacecraft frame and in GSE and the status for AE mode; and (3) Overview plot of the main parameters for both modes for every 3 h for one reference spacecraft (usually Cluster III). Besides the main products, there also are raw data and auxiliary data. Raw data consist of merged science files (MSF) that are obtained by merging the housekeeping and science (burst (BM) and normal (NM) mode) telemetry files. They are in binary format. Auxiliary are either data used internally by the main data production software or data dedicated to intercalibration or time-interval lists of the EDI operation modes. For more details, see "The Cluster Active Archive: Studying the Earth's Space Plasma Environment", edited by Dr. Harri Laakso, Matthew G. T. T. Taylor, C. Philippe Escoubet, from which this information was obtained.

4) Cluster II Salsa Prime Parameter Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Data maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VMO/NumericalData/Cluster-Salsa/EDI/PrimeParameter/4S
Start:2000-12-09 00:00:00 Observatory:Cluster FM6 (Salsa) Cadence:4 seconds
Stop:2016-09-14 07:58:21 Instrument:Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Resource:NumericalData
This instrument (EDI: Electron Drift Instrument) measures the drift of a weak beam of test electrons that, when emitted in certain directions, return to the spacecraft after one gyration. This drift is related to the electric field and the gradient in the magnetic field, and these quantities can, by the use of different electron energies, be determined separately. The fundamental time step to determine the new parameters and direct the beams and the detectors is 2 ms. Inter-experiment links include: magnetic field information from FGM and STAFF, a blanking pulse received from WHISPER to warn of possible interference from that active experiment, and a similar blanking pulse sent to PEACE when the EDI electron beam could interfere with the PEACE electron measurement. For more details of the Cluster mission, the spacecraft, and its instruments, see the report Cluster: mission, payload and supporting activities, March 1993, ESA SP-1159, and the included article The Electron Drift Instrument for Cluster, by G. Paschmann et al., from which this information was obtained.

5) Cluster Samba Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Data at the ESA Cluster Science Archive maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VSPO/NumericalData/Cluster-Samba/EDI/CSA/PT0.0625S
Start:2001-01-30 00:00:00 Observatory:Cluster FM7 (Samba) Cadence:0.0625 seconds
Stop:2016-09-14 08:00:04 Instrument:Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Resource:NumericalData
The Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) data products from the Cluster spacecraft in three main categories: (1) Electron enegergies measured between 0.5 and 1.0 keV for the Windshield Wiper mode: time series of the three components of the electron drift velocity and of the three components of the electric field in Cartesian GSE coordinate system (corrected for spacecraft motion) with different qualities and time resolution at 1-4 sec (PP, PPP, MPD); (2) Ambient electron measurements at fixed enegeris of 0.5 or 1.0 keV: time series of electron counts normally at 16 ms for the three pitch angles 0 deg, 90 deg, 180 deg, the detector look direction in the spacecraft frame and in GSE and the status for AE mode; and (3) Overview plot of the main parameters for both modes for every 3 h for one reference spacecraft (usually Cluster III). Besides the main products, there also are raw data and auxiliary data. Raw data consist of merged science files (MSF) that are obtained by merging the housekeeping and science (burst (BM) and normal (NM) mode) telemetry files. They are in binary format. Auxiliary are either data used internally by the main data production software or data dedicated to intercalibration or time-interval lists of the EDI operation modes. For more details, see "The Cluster Active Archive: Studying the Earth's Space Plasma Environment", edited by Dr. Harri Laakso, Matthew G. T. T. Taylor, C. Philippe Escoubet, from which this information was obtained.

6) Cluster II Samba Prime Parameter Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Data maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VMO/NumericalData/Cluster-Samba/EDI/PrimeParameter/4S
Start:2000-12-09 00:00:00 Observatory:Cluster FM7 (Samba) Cadence:4 seconds
Stop:2016-09-14 07:58:22 Instrument:Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Resource:NumericalData
This instrument (EDI: Electron Drift Instrument) measures the drift of a weak beam of test electrons that, when emitted in certain directions, return to the spacecraft after one gyration. This drift is related to the electric field and the gradient in the magnetic field, and these quantities can, by the use of different electron energies, be determined separately. The fundamental time step to determine the new parameters and direct the beams and the detectors is 2 ms. Inter-experiment links include: magnetic field information from FGM and STAFF, a blanking pulse received from WHISPER to warn of possible interference from that active experiment, and a similar blanking pulse sent to PEACE when the EDI electron beam could interfere with the PEACE electron measurement. For more details of the Cluster mission, the spacecraft, and its instruments, see the report Cluster: mission, payload and supporting activities, March 1993, ESA SP-1159, and the included article The Electron Drift Instrument for Cluster, by G. Paschmann et al., from which this information was obtained.

7) Cluster Tango Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Data at the ESA Cluster Science Archive maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VSPO/NumericalData/Cluster-Tango/EDI/CSA/PT0.0625S
Start:2001-01-30 00:00:00 Observatory:Cluster FM8 (Tango) Cadence:0.0625 seconds
Stop:2016-09-14 07:59:52 Instrument:Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Resource:NumericalData
The Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) data products from the Cluster spacecraft in three main categories: (1) Electron enegergies measured between 0.5 and 1.0 keV for the Windshield Wiper mode: time series of the three components of the electron drift velocity and of the three components of the electric field in Cartesian GSE coordinate system (corrected for spacecraft motion) with different qualities and time resolution at 1-4 sec (PP, PPP, MPD); (2) Ambient electron measurements at fixed enegeris of 0.5 or 1.0 keV: time series of electron counts normally at 16 ms for the three pitch angles 0 deg, 90 deg, 180 deg, the detector look direction in the spacecraft frame and in GSE and the status for AE mode; and (3) Overview plot of the main parameters for both modes for every 3 h for one reference spacecraft (usually Cluster III). Besides the main products, there also are raw data and auxiliary data. Raw data consist of merged science files (MSF) that are obtained by merging the housekeeping and science (burst (BM) and normal (NM) mode) telemetry files. They are in binary format. Auxiliary are either data used internally by the main data production software or data dedicated to intercalibration or time-interval lists of the EDI operation modes. For more details, see "The Cluster Active Archive: Studying the Earth's Space Plasma Environment", edited by Dr. Harri Laakso, Matthew G. T. T. Taylor, C. Philippe Escoubet, from which this information was obtained.

8) Cluster II Tango Prime Parameter Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Data maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VMO/NumericalData/Cluster-Tango/EDI/PrimeParameter/4S
Start:2000-12-09 00:00:00 Observatory:Cluster FM8 (Tango) Cadence:4 seconds
Stop:2016-09-14 07:58:19 Instrument:Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Resource:NumericalData
This instrument (EDI: Electron Drift Instrument) measures the drift of a weak beam of test electrons that, when emitted in certain directions, return to the spacecraft after one gyration. This drift is related to the electric field and the gradient in the magnetic field, and these quantities can, by the use of different electron energies, be determined separately. The fundamental time step to determine the new parameters and direct the beams and the detectors is 2 ms. Inter-experiment links include: magnetic field information from FGM and STAFF, a blanking pulse received from WHISPER to warn of possible interference from that active experiment, and a similar blanking pulse sent to PEACE when the EDI electron beam could interfere with the PEACE electron measurement. For more details of the Cluster mission, the spacecraft, and its instruments, see the report Cluster: mission, payload and supporting activities, March 1993, ESA SP-1159, and the included article The Electron Drift Instrument for Cluster, by G. Paschmann et al., from which this information was obtained.

9) Cluster EDI Survey Plots maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VSPO/DisplayData/Cluster/EDI/PLOTS
Start:2001-12-01 00:00:00 Observatory:Cluster FM5 (Rumba) Cadence:
Stop:2016-09-14 07:59:48 Instrument:Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Resource:DisplayData
Cluster EDI high resolution survey plots, 3 hours/plot, mostly from Cluster 3, electron drift velocities, fluxes, anisotropies

10) Cluster II Summary Parameter Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Data maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VMO/NumericalData/Cluster/EDI/SummaryParameter/60S
Start:2001-02-01 00:00:00 Observatory:Cluster FM5 (Rumba) Cadence:60 seconds
Stop:2016-09-14 07:58:16 Instrument:Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Resource:NumericalData
This instrument (EDI: Electron Drift Instrument) measures the drift of a weak beam of test electrons that, when emitted in certain directions, return to the spacecraft after one gyration. This drift is related to the electric field and the gradient in the magnetic field, and these quantities can, by the use of different electron energies, be determined separately. The fundamental time step to determine the new parameters and direct the beams and the detectors is 2 ms. Inter-experiment links include: magnetic field information from FGM and STAFF, a blanking pulse received from WHISPER to warn of possible interference from that active experiment, and a similar blanking pulse sent to PEACE when the EDI electron beam could interfere with the PEACE electron measurement. For more details of the Cluster mission, the spacecraft, and its instruments, see the report Cluster: mission, payload and supporting activities, March 1993, ESA SP-1159, and the included article The Electron Drift Instrument for Cluster, by G. Paschmann et al., from which this information was obtained.

11) Equator-S Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) 1-min Prime Parameters maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VSPO/NumericalData/Equator-S/EDI/PP/PT60s
Start:1998-03-25 21:53:13 Observatory:Equator-S Cadence:60 seconds
Stop:1998-04-26 09:25:25 Instrument:Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Resource:NumericalData
This data set contains Key Parameters of the Electron Drift Instrument (EDI). The following one-minute summary parameters are given versus time: drift velocity and electric field in GSE coordinates.

12) MMS 1 Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Ambient Electron Flux, Projection Method 2 (PM2), Level 2, Burst Survey maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VSPO/NumericalData/MMS/1/FIELDS/EDI/Burst/Level2/AmbientElectronFlux/ProjectionMethod2/PT0.0009765625S
Start:2016-01-14 20:45:04 Observatory:MMS-1 Cadence:0.0009765625 seconds
Stop:2016-09-14 07:59:56 Instrument:MMS 1 FIELDS Suite, Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Resource:NumericalData
Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Ambient Burst Survey, Level 2, 0.0009765625 s Data (1024 samples/s). EDI has two scientific data acquisition modes, called electric field mode and ambient mode. In electric field mode, two coded electron beams are emitted such that they return to the detectors after one or more gyrations in the ambient magnetic and electric field. The firing directions and times-of-flight allow the derivation of the drift velocity and electric field. In ambient mode, the electron beams are not used. The detectors with their large geometric factors and their ability to adjust the field of view quickly allow continuous sampling of ambient electrons at a selected pitch angle and fixed but selectable energy. To find the beam directions that will hit the detector, EDI sweeps each beam in the plane perpendicular to B at a fixed angular rate of 0.22 /ms until a signal has been acquired by the detector. Once signal has been acquired, the beams are swept back and forth to stay on target. Beam detection is not determined from the changes in the count-rates directly, but from the square of the beam counts divided by the background counts from ambient electrons, i.e., from the square of the instantaneous signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). This quantity is computed from data provided by the correlator in the Gun-Detector Electronics that also generates the coding pattern imposed on the outgoing beams. If the squared SNR ratio exceeds a threshold, this is taken as evidence that the beam is returning to the detector. The thresholds for SNR are chosen dependent on background fluxes. They represent a compromise between getting false hits (induced by strong variations in background electron fluxes) and missing true beam hits. The basic software loop that controls EDI operations is executed every 2 ms. As the times when the beams hit their detectors are neither synchronized with the telemetry nor equidistant, EDI data have no fixed time-resolution. Data are reported in telemetry slots. In Survey, using the standard packing mode 0, there are eight telemetry slots per second and Gyn Detector Unit (GDU). The last beam detected during the previous slot will be reported in the current slot. If no beam has been detected, the data quality will be set to zero. In Burst telemetry there are 128 slots per second and GDU. The data in each slot consists of information regarding the beam firing directions (stored in the form of analytic gun deflection voltages), times-of-flight (if successfully measured), quality indicators, time stamps of the beam hits, and some auxiliary correlator-related information. Whenever EDI is not in electron drift mode, it uses its ambient electron mode. The mode has the capability to sample at either 90 degrees pitch angle or at 0/180 degrees (field aligned), or to alternate between 90 degrees and field aligned with selectable dwell times. While all options have been demonstrated during the commissioning phase, only the field aligned mode has been used in the routine operations phase. The choices for energy are 250 eV, 500 eV, and 1 keV. The two detectors, which are facing opposite hemispheres, are looking strictly into opposite directions, so while one detector is looking along B the other is looking antiparallel to B (corresponding to pitch angles of 180 and 0 degrees, respectively). The two detectors switch roles every half spin of the spacecraft as the tip of the magnetic field vector spins outside the field of view of one detector and into the field of view of the other detector. Starting January 4, 2016, the anodes were chosen such that the projection of the magnetic field vector was best aligned with the center of the first (that is, outer) of the four anodes. This provides coverage of a larger range of pitch angles in general. Data taken in this configuration are identified by the term "amb-pm2" in the data product names. In the burst data where four channels (corresponding to the four adjacent sensor anode pads) are sampled per GDU, channel 1 represents best the pitch angle of 0 degrees (or 180 degrees). The EDI instrument paper can be found at: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs11214-015-0182-7. The EDI instrument data products guide can be found at https://lasp.colorado.edu/mms/sdc/public/datasets/fields/.

13) MMS 1 Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Electric Field, Level 2, Burst Survey maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VSPO/NumericalData/MMS/1/FIELDS/EDI/Burst/Level2/ElectricField/PT0.0009765625S
Start:2015-09-14 14:13:04 Observatory:MMS-1 Cadence:0.0009765625 seconds
Stop:2016-09-14 07:59:56 Instrument:MMS 1 FIELDS Suite, Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Resource:NumericalData
Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Electric Field Burst Survey, Level 2, 0.0009765625 s Data (1024 samples/s). EDI has two scientific data acquisition modes, called electric field mode and ambient mode. In electric field mode, two coded electron beams are emitted such that they return to the detectors after one or more gyrations in the ambient magnetic and electric field. The firing directions and times-of-flight allow the derivation of the drift velocity and electric field. In ambient mode, the electron beams are not used. The detectors with their large geometric factors and their ability to adjust the field of view quickly allow continuous sampling of ambient electrons at a selected pitch angle and fixed but selectable energy. To find the beam directions that will hit the detector, EDI sweeps each beam in the plane perpendicular to B at a fixed angular rate of 0.22 /ms until a signal has been acquired by the detector. Once signal has been acquired, the beams are swept back and forth to stay on target. Beam detection is not determined from the changes in the count-rates directly, but from the square of the beam counts divided by the background counts from ambient electrons, i.e., from the square of the instantaneous signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). This quantity is computed from data provided by the correlator in the Gun-Detector Electronics that also generates the coding pattern imposed on the outgoing beams. If the squared SNR ratio exceeds a threshold, this is taken as evidence that the beam is returning to the detector. The thresholds for SNR are chosen dependent on background fluxes. They represent a compromise between getting false hits (induced by strong variations in background electron fluxes) and missing true beam hits. The basic software loop that controls EDI operations is executed every 2 ms. As the times when the beams hit their detectors are neither synchronized with the telemetry nor equidistant, EDI data have no fixed time-resolution. Data are reported in telemetry slots. In Survey, using the standard packing mode 0, there are eight telemetry slots per second and Gyn Detector Unit (GDU). The last beam detected during the previous slot will be reported in the current slot. If no beam has been detected, the data quality will be set to zero. In Burst telemetry there are 128 slots per second and GDU. The data in each slot consists of information regarding the beam firing directions (stored in the form of analytic gun deflection voltages), times-of-flight (if successfully measured), quality indicators, time stamps of the beam hits, and some auxiliary correlator-related information. Whenever EDI is not in electron drift mode, it uses its ambient electron mode. The mode has the capability to sample at either 90 degrees pitch angle or at 0/180 degrees (field aligned), or to alternate between 90 degrees and field aligned with selectable dwell times. While all options have been demonstrated during the commissioning phase, only the field aligned mode has been used in the routine operations phase. The choices for energy are 250 eV, 500 eV, and 1 keV. The two detectors, which are facing opposite hemispheres, are looking strictly into opposite directions, so while one detector is looking along B the other is looking antiparallel to B (corresponding to pitch angles of 180 and 0 degrees, respectively). The two detectors switch roles every half spin of the spacecraft as the tip of the magnetic field vector spins outside the field of view of one detector and into the field of view of the other detector. This is the primary data product generated from data collected in electric field mode. The science data generated are drift velocity and electric field data in various coordinate systems. They are derived from triangulation and/or time-of-flight analysis. Where both methods are applicable, their results will be combined using a weighting approach based on their relative errors. The EDI instrument paper can be found at: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs11214-015-0182-7. The EDI instrument data products guide can be found at https://lasp.colorado.edu/mms/sdc/public/datasets/fields/.

14) MMS 1 Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Ambient Electron Flux, Projection Method 1 (PM1), Level 2, Burst Survey maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VSPO/NumericalData/MMS/1/FIELDS/EDI/Burst/Level2/ElectronFluxAmbient/ProjectionMethod1/PT0.0009765625S
Start:2015-09-01 12:11:14 Observatory:MMS-1 Cadence:0.0009765625 seconds
Stop:2016-09-14 07:59:56 Instrument:MMS 1 FIELDS Suite, Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Resource:NumericalData
Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Ambient Burst Survey, Level 2, 0.0009765625 s Data (1024 samples/s). EDI has two scientific data acquisition modes, called electric field mode and ambient mode. In electric field mode, two coded electron beams are emitted such that they return to the detectors after one or more gyrations in the ambient magnetic and electric field. The firing directions and times-of-flight allow the derivation of the drift velocity and electric field. In ambient mode, the electron beams are not used. The detectors with their large geometric factors and their ability to adjust the field of view quickly allow continuous sampling of ambient electrons at a selected pitch angle and fixed but selectable energy. To find the beam directions that will hit the detector, EDI sweeps each beam in the plane perpendicular to B at a fixed angular rate of 0.22 /ms until a signal has been acquired by the detector. Once signal has been acquired, the beams are swept back and forth to stay on target. Beam detection is not determined from the changes in the count-rates directly, but from the square of the beam counts divided by the background counts from ambient electrons, i.e., from the square of the instantaneous signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). This quantity is computed from data provided by the correlator in the Gun-Detector Electronics that also generates the coding pattern imposed on the outgoing beams. If the squared SNR ratio exceeds a threshold, this is taken as evidence that the beam is returning to the detector. The thresholds for SNR are chosen dependent on background fluxes. They represent a compromise between getting false hits (induced by strong variations in background electron fluxes) and missing true beam hits. The basic software loop that controls EDI operations is executed every 2 ms. As the times when the beams hit their detectors are neither synchronized with the telemetry nor equidistant, EDI data have no fixed time-resolution. Data are reported in telemetry slots. In Survey, using the standard packing mode 0, there are eight telemetry slots per second and Gyn Detector Unit (GDU). The last beam detected during the previous slot will be reported in the current slot. If no beam has been detected, the data quality will be set to zero. In Burst telemetry there are 128 slots per second and GDU. The data in each slot consists of information regarding the beam firing directions (stored in the form of analytic gun deflection voltages), times-of-flight (if successfully measured), quality indicators, time stamps of the beam hits, and some auxiliary correlator-related information. Whenever EDI is not in electron drift mode, it uses its ambient electron mode. The mode has the capability to sample at either 90 degrees pitch angle or at 0/180 degrees (field aligned), or to alternate between 90 degrees and field aligned with selectable dwell times. While all options have been demonstrated during the commissioning phase, only the field aligned mode has been used in the routine operations phase. The choices for energy are 250 eV, 500 eV, and 1 keV. The two detectors, which are facing opposite hemispheres, are looking strictly into opposite directions, so while one detector is looking along B the other is looking antiparallel to B (corresponding to pitch angles of 180 and 0 degrees, respectively). The two detectors switch roles every half spin of the spacecraft as the tip of the magnetic field vector spins outside the field of view of one detector and into the field of view of the other detector. Up until January 4, 2016 the anodes were chosen such that the magnetic field vector projected into the plane of the micro-channel plate entry surface was best aligned with the center of the four anodes ( that is, with the gap between the inner two of the four anodes). Data taken in this configuration are using the term "amb" in the data product names. In the burst data where four channels (corresponding to the four adjacent sensor anode pads) are sampled per GDU, the average (or sum) of the center two channels (channels 2 and 3) represents best the pitch angle of 0 degrees (or 180 degrees). The EDI instrument paper can be found at: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs11214-015-0182-7. The EDI instrument data products guide can be found at https://lasp.colorado.edu/mms/sdc/public/datasets/fields/.

15) MMS 1 Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Quality 0 Counts, Level 2, Burst Survey maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VSPO/NumericalData/MMS/1/FIELDS/EDI/Burst/Level2/QualityZero/PT0.0078125S
Start:2015-09-14 13:58:04 Observatory:MMS-1 Cadence:0.0078125 seconds
Stop:2016-09-14 07:59:56 Instrument:MMS 1 FIELDS Suite, Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Resource:NumericalData
Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Q0 Burst Survey, Level 2, 0.0078125 s Data (128 samples/s). EDI has two scientific data acquisition modes, called electric field mode and ambient mode. In electric field mode, two coded electron beams are emitted such that they return to the detectors after one or more gyrations in the ambient magnetic and electric field. The firing directions and times-of-flight allow the derivation of the drift velocity and electric field. In ambient mode, the electron beams are not used. The detectors with their large geometric factors and their ability to adjust the field of view quickly allow continuous sampling of ambient electrons at a selected pitch angle and fixed but selectable energy. To find the beam directions that will hit the detector, EDI sweeps each beam in the plane perpendicular to B at a fixed angular rate of 0.22 /ms until a signal has been acquired by the detector. Once signal has been acquired, the beams are swept back and forth to stay on target. Beam detection is not determined from the changes in the count-rates directly, but from the square of the beam counts divided by the background counts from ambient electrons, i.e., from the square of the instantaneous signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). This quantity is computed from data provided by the correlator in the Gun-Detector Electronics that also generates the coding pattern imposed on the outgoing beams. If the squared SNR ratio exceeds a threshold, this is taken as evidence that the beam is returning to the detector. The thresholds for SNR are chosen dependent on background fluxes. They represent a compromise between getting false hits (induced by strong variations in background electron fluxes) and missing true beam hits. The basic software loop that controls EDI operations is executed every 2 ms. As the times when the beams hit their detectors are neither synchronized with the telemetry nor equidistant, EDI data have no fixed time-resolution. Data are reported in telemetry slots. In Survey, using the standard packing mode 0, there are eight telemetry slots per second and Gyn Detector Unit (GDU). The last beam detected during the previous slot will be reported in the current slot. If no beam has been detected, the data quality will be set to zero. In Burst telemetry there are 128 slots per second and GDU. The data in each slot consists of information regarding the beam firing directions (stored in the form of analytic gun deflection voltages), times-of-flight (if successfully measured), quality indicators, time stamps of the beam hits, and some auxiliary correlator-related information. Whenever EDI is not in electron drift mode, it uses its ambient electron mode. The mode has the capability to sample at either 90 degrees pitch angle or at 0/180 degrees (field aligned), or to alternate between 90 degrees and field aligned with selectable dwell times. While all options have been demonstrated during the commissioning phase, only the field aligned mode has been used in the routine operations phase. The choices for energy are 250 eV, 500 eV, and 1 keV. The two detectors, which are facing opposite hemispheres, are looking strictly into opposite directions, so while one detector is looking along B the other is looking antiparallel to B (corresponding to pitch angles of 180 and 0 degrees, respectively). The two detectors switch roles every half spin of the spacecraft as the tip of the magnetic field vector spins outside the field of view of one detector and into the field of view of the other detector. These data are a by-product generated from data collected in electric field mode. Whenever no return beam is found in a particular time slot by the flight software to be reported will be flagged with the lowest quality level (quality zero). The ground processing generates a separate data product from these counts data. The EDI instrument paper can be found at: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs11214-015-0182-7. The EDI instrument data products guide can be found at https://lasp.colorado.edu/mms/sdc/public/datasets/fields/.

16) MMS 1 Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Electric Field, Level 2, Quick-Look Survey maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VSPO/NumericalData/MMS/1/FIELDS/EDI/Survey/Level2/ElectricField/PT5S
Start:2015-09-01 00:00:00 Observatory:MMS-1 Cadence:5 seconds
Stop:2016-09-14 07:59:56 Instrument:MMS 1 FIELDS Suite, Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Resource:NumericalData
Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Electric Field Survey, Level 2, 5 s Data. EDI has two scientific data acquisition modes, called electric field mode and ambient mode. In electric field mode, two coded electron beams are emitted such that they return to the detectors after one or more gyrations in the ambient magnetic and electric field. The firing directions and times-of-flight allow the derivation of the drift velocity and electric field. In ambient mode, the electron beams are not used. The detectors with their large geometric factors and their ability to adjust the field of view quickly allow continuous sampling of ambient electrons at a selected pitch angle and fixed but selectable energy. To find the beam directions that will hit the detector, EDI sweeps each beam in the plane perpendicular to B at a fixed angular rate of 0.22 /ms until a signal has been acquired by the detector. Once signal has been acquired, the beams are swept back and forth to stay on target. Beam detection is not determined from the changes in the count-rates directly, but from the square of the beam counts divided by the background counts from ambient electrons, i.e., from the square of the instantaneous signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). This quantity is computed from data provided by the correlator in the Gun-Detector Electronics that also generates the coding pattern imposed on the outgoing beams. If the squared SNR ratio exceeds a threshold, this is taken as evidence that the beam is returning to the detector. The thresholds for SNR are chosen dependent on background fluxes. They represent a compromise between getting false hits (induced by strong variations in background electron fluxes) and missing true beam hits. The basic software loop that controls EDI operations is executed every 2 ms. As the times when the beams hit their detectors are neither synchronized with the telemetry nor equidistant, EDI data have no fixed time-resolution. Data are reported in telemetry slots. In Survey, using the standard packing mode 0, there are eight telemetry slots per second and Gyn Detector Unit (GDU). The last beam detected during the previous slot will be reported in the current slot. If no beam has been detected, the data quality will be set to zero. In Burst telemetry there are 128 slots per second and GDU. The data in each slot consists of information regarding the beam firing directions (stored in the form of analytic gun deflection voltages), times-of-flight (if successfully measured), quality indicators, time stamps of the beam hits, and some auxiliary correlator-related information. Whenever EDI is not in electron drift mode, it uses its ambient electron mode. The mode has the capability to sample at either 90 degrees pitch angle or at 0/180 degrees (field aligned), or to alternate between 90 degrees and field aligned with selectable dwell times. While all options have been demonstrated during the commissioning phase, only the field aligned mode has been used in the routine operations phase. The choices for energy are 250 eV, 500 eV, and 1 keV. The two detectors, which are facing opposite hemispheres, are looking strictly into opposite directions, so while one detector is looking along B the other is looking antiparallel to B (corresponding to pitch angles of 180 and 0 degrees, respectively). The two detectors switch roles every half spin of the spacecraft as the tip of the magnetic field vector spins outside the field of view of one detector and into the field of view of the other detector. This is the primary data product generated from data collected in electric field mode. The science data generated are drift velocity and electric field data in various coordinate systems. They are derived from triangulation and/or time-of-flight analysis. Where both methods are applicable, their results will be combined using a weighting approach based on their relative errors. The EDI instrument paper can be found at: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs11214-015-0182-7. The EDI instrument data products guide can be found at https://lasp.colorado.edu/mms/sdc/public/datasets/fields/.

17) MMS 1 Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Ambient Electron Flux, Projection Method 1 (PM1), Level 2, Quick-Look Survey maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VSPO/NumericalData/MMS/1/FIELDS/EDI/Survey/Level2/ElectronFluxAmbient/ProjectionMethod1/PT0.03125S
Start:2015-09-01 00:00:00 Observatory:MMS-1 Cadence:0.03125 seconds
Stop:2016-09-14 07:59:56 Instrument:MMS 1 FIELDS Suite, Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Resource:NumericalData
Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Ambient Survey, Level 2, 0.03125 s Data. (32 samples/s)EDI has two scientific data acquisition modes, called electric field mode and ambient mode. In electric field mode, two coded electron beams are emitted such that they return to the detectors after one or more gyrations in the ambient magnetic and electric field. The firing directions and times-of-flight allow the derivation of the drift velocity and electric field. In ambient mode, the electron beams are not used. The detectors with their large geometric factors and their ability to adjust the field of view quickly allow continuous sampling of ambient electrons at a selected pitch angle and fixed but selectable energy. To find the beam directions that will hit the detector, EDI sweeps each beam in the plane perpendicular to B at a fixed angular rate of 0.22 /ms until a signal has been acquired by the detector. Once signal has been acquired, the beams are swept back and forth to stay on target. Beam detection is not determined from the changes in the count-rates directly, but from the square of the beam counts divided by the background counts from ambient electrons, i.e., from the square of the instantaneous signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). This quantity is computed from data provided by the correlator in the Gun-Detector Electronics that also generates the coding pattern imposed on the outgoing beams. If the squared SNR ratio exceeds a threshold, this is taken as evidence that the beam is returning to the detector. The thresholds for SNR are chosen dependent on background fluxes. They represent a compromise between getting false hits (induced by strong variations in background electron fluxes) and missing true beam hits. The basic software loop that controls EDI operations is executed every 2 ms. As the times when the beams hit their detectors are neither synchronized with the telemetry nor equidistant, EDI data have no fixed time-resolution. Data are reported in telemetry slots. In Survey, using the standard packing mode 0, there are eight telemetry slots per second and Gyn Detector Unit (GDU). The last beam detected during the previous slot will be reported in the current slot. If no beam has been detected, the data quality will be set to zero. In Burst telemetry there are 128 slots per second and GDU. The data in each slot consists of information regarding the beam firing directions (stored in the form of analytic gun deflection voltages), times-of-flight (if successfully measured), quality indicators, time stamps of the beam hits, and some auxiliary correlator-related information. Whenever EDI is not in electron drift mode, it uses its ambient electron mode. The mode has the capability to sample at either 90 degrees pitch angle or at 0/180 degrees (field aligned), or to alternate between 90 degrees and field aligned with selectable dwell times. While all options have been demonstrated during the commissioning phase, only the field aligned mode has been used in the routine operations phase. The choices for energy are 250 eV, 500 eV, and 1 keV. The two detectors, which are facing opposite hemispheres, are looking strictly into opposite directions, so while one detector is looking along B the other is looking antiparallel to B (corresponding to pitch angles of 180 and 0 degrees, respectively). The two detectors switch roles every half spin of the spacecraft as the tip of the magnetic field vector spins outside the field of view of one detector and into the field of view of the other detector. Up until January 4, 2016 the anodes were chosen such that the magnetic field vector projected into the plane of the micro-channel plate entry surface was best aligned with the center of the four anodes ( that is, with the gap between the inner two of the four anodes). Data taken in this configuration are using the term "amb" in the data product names. In the burst data where four channels (corresponding to the four adjacent sensor anode pads) are sampled per GDU, the average (or sum) of the center two channels (channels 2 and 3) represents best the pitch angle of 0 degrees (or 180 degrees). The EDI instrument paper can be found at: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs11214-015-0182-7. The EDI instrument data products guide can be found at https://lasp.colorado.edu/mms/sdc/public/datasets/fields/.

18) MMS 1 Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Ambient Electron Flux, Projection Method 1 (PM2), Level 2, Quick-Look Survey maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VSPO/NumericalData/MMS/1/FIELDS/EDI/Survey/Level2/ElectronFluxAmbient/ProjectionMethod2/PT0.03125S
Start:2016-01-06 00:00:00 Observatory:MMS-1 Cadence:0.03125 seconds
Stop:2016-09-14 07:59:56 Instrument:MMS 1 FIELDS Suite, Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Resource:NumericalData
Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Ambient Survey, Level 2, 0.03125 s Data (32 samples/s). EDI has two scientific data acquisition modes, called electric field mode and ambient mode. In electric field mode, two coded electron beams are emitted such that they return to the detectors after one or more gyrations in the ambient magnetic and electric field. The firing directions and times-of-flight allow the derivation of the drift velocity and electric field. In ambient mode, the electron beams are not used. The detectors with their large geometric factors and their ability to adjust the field of view quickly allow continuous sampling of ambient electrons at a selected pitch angle and fixed but selectable energy. To find the beam directions that will hit the detector, EDI sweeps each beam in the plane perpendicular to B at a fixed angular rate of 0.22 /ms until a signal has been acquired by the detector. Once signal has been acquired, the beams are swept back and forth to stay on target. Beam detection is not determined from the changes in the count-rates directly, but from the square of the beam counts divided by the background counts from ambient electrons, i.e., from the square of the instantaneous signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). This quantity is computed from data provided by the correlator in the Gun-Detector Electronics that also generates the coding pattern imposed on the outgoing beams. If the squared SNR ratio exceeds a threshold, this is taken as evidence that the beam is returning to the detector. The thresholds for SNR are chosen dependent on background fluxes. They represent a compromise between getting false hits (induced by strong variations in background electron fluxes) and missing true beam hits. The basic software loop that controls EDI operations is executed every 2 ms. As the times when the beams hit their detectors are neither synchronized with the telemetry nor equidistant, EDI data have no fixed time-resolution. Data are reported in telemetry slots. In Survey, using the standard packing mode 0, there are eight telemetry slots per second and Gyn Detector Unit (GDU). The last beam detected during the previous slot will be reported in the current slot. If no beam has been detected, the data quality will be set to zero. In Burst telemetry there are 128 slots per second and GDU. The data in each slot consists of information regarding the beam firing directions (stored in the form of analytic gun deflection voltages), times-of-flight (if successfully measured), quality indicators, time stamps of the beam hits, and some auxiliary correlator-related information. Whenever EDI is not in electron drift mode, it uses its ambient electron mode. The mode has the capability to sample at either 90 degrees pitch angle or at 0/180 degrees (field aligned), or to alternate between 90 degrees and field aligned with selectable dwell times. While all options have been demonstrated during the commissioning phase, only the field aligned mode has been used in the routine operations phase. The choices for energy are 250 eV, 500 eV, and 1 keV. The two detectors, which are facing opposite hemispheres, are looking strictly into opposite directions, so while one detector is looking along B the other is looking antiparallel to B (corresponding to pitch angles of 180 and 0 degrees, respectively). The two detectors switch roles every half spin of the spacecraft as the tip of the magnetic field vector spins outside the field of view of one detector and into the field of view of the other detector. Starting January 4, 2016, the anodes were chosen such that the projection of the magnetic field vector was best aligned with the center of the first (that is, outer) of the four anodes. This provides coverage of a larger range of pitch angles in general. Data taken in this configuration are identified by the term "amb-pm2" in the data product names. In the burst data where four channels (corresponding to the four adjacent sensor anode pads) are sampled per GDU, channel 1 represents best the pitch angle of 0 degrees (or 180 degrees). The EDI instrument paper can be found at: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs11214-015-0182-7. The EDI instrument data products guide can be found at https://lasp.colorado.edu/mms/sdc/public/datasets/fields/.

19) MMS 1 Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Quality Zero Counts, Level 2, Quick-Look Survey maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VSPO/NumericalData/MMS/1/FIELDS/EDI/Survey/Level2/QualityZero/PT0.125S
Start:2015-04-21 00:00:00 Observatory:MMS-1 Cadence:0.125 seconds
Stop:2016-09-14 07:59:56 Instrument:MMS 1 FIELDS Suite, Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Resource:NumericalData
Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Q0 Survey, Level 2, 0.125 s Data (8 samples/s). EDI has two scientific data acquisition modes, called electric field mode and ambient mode. In electric field mode, two coded electron beams are emitted such that they return to the detectors after one or more gyrations in the ambient magnetic and electric field. The firing directions and times-of-flight allow the derivation of the drift velocity and electric field. In ambient mode, the electron beams are not used. The detectors with their large geometric factors and their ability to adjust the field of view quickly allow continuous sampling of ambient electrons at a selected pitch angle and fixed but selectable energy. To find the beam directions that will hit the detector, EDI sweeps each beam in the plane perpendicular to B at a fixed angular rate of 0.22 /ms until a signal has been acquired by the detector. Once signal has been acquired, the beams are swept back and forth to stay on target. Beam detection is not determined from the changes in the count-rates directly, but from the square of the beam counts divided by the background counts from ambient electrons, i.e., from the square of the instantaneous signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). This quantity is computed from data provided by the correlator in the Gun-Detector Electronics that also generates the coding pattern imposed on the outgoing beams. If the squared SNR ratio exceeds a threshold, this is taken as evidence that the beam is returning to the detector. The thresholds for SNR are chosen dependent on background fluxes. They represent a compromise between getting false hits (induced by strong variations in background electron fluxes) and missing true beam hits. The basic software loop that controls EDI operations is executed every 2 ms. As the times when the beams hit their detectors are neither synchronized with the telemetry nor equidistant, EDI data have no fixed time-resolution. Data are reported in telemetry slots. In Survey, using the standard packing mode 0, there are eight telemetry slots per second and Gyn Detector Unit (GDU). The last beam detected during the previous slot will be reported in the current slot. If no beam has been detected, the data quality will be set to zero. In Burst telemetry there are 128 slots per second and GDU. The data in each slot consists of information regarding the beam firing directions (stored in the form of analytic gun deflection voltages), times-of-flight (if successfully measured), quality indicators, time stamps of the beam hits, and some auxiliary correlator-related information. Whenever EDI is not in electron drift mode, it uses its ambient electron mode. The mode has the capability to sample at either 90 degrees pitch angle or at 0/180 degrees (field aligned), or to alternate between 90 degrees and field aligned with selectable dwell times. While all options have been demonstrated during the commissioning phase, only the field aligned mode has been used in the routine operations phase. The choices for energy are 250 eV, 500 eV, and 1 keV. The two detectors, which are facing opposite hemispheres, are looking strictly into opposite directions, so while one detector is looking along B the other is looking antiparallel to B (corresponding to pitch angles of 180 and 0 degrees, respectively). The two detectors switch roles every half spin of the spacecraft as the tip of the magnetic field vector spins outside the field of view of one detector and into the field of view of the other detector. These data are a by-product generated from data collected in electric field mode. Whenever no return beam is found in a particular time slot by the flight software to be reported will be flagged with the lowest quality level (quality zero). The ground processing generates a separate data product from these counts data. The EDI instrument paper can be found at: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs11214-015-0182-7. The EDI instrument data products guide can be found at https://lasp.colorado.edu/mms/sdc/public/datasets/fields/.

20) MMS 2 Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Ambient Electron Flux, Projection Method 2 (PM2), Level 2, Burst Survey maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VSPO/NumericalData/MMS/2/FIELDS/EDI/Burst/Level2/AmbientElectronFlux/ProjectionMethod2/PT0.0009765625S
Start:2016-01-04 22:33:24 Observatory:MMS-2 Cadence:0.0009765625 seconds
Stop:2016-09-14 08:00:02 Instrument:MMS 2 FIELDS Suite, Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Resource:NumericalData
Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Ambient Burst Survey, Level 2, 0.0009765625 s Data (1024 samples/s). EDI has two scientific data acquisition modes, called electric field mode and ambient mode. In electric field mode, two coded electron beams are emitted such that they return to the detectors after one or more gyrations in the ambient magnetic and electric field. The firing directions and times-of-flight allow the derivation of the drift velocity and electric field. In ambient mode, the electron beams are not used. The detectors with their large geometric factors and their ability to adjust the field of view quickly allow continuous sampling of ambient electrons at a selected pitch angle and fixed but selectable energy. To find the beam directions that will hit the detector, EDI sweeps each beam in the plane perpendicular to B at a fixed angular rate of 0.22 /ms until a signal has been acquired by the detector. Once signal has been acquired, the beams are swept back and forth to stay on target. Beam detection is not determined from the changes in the count-rates directly, but from the square of the beam counts divided by the background counts from ambient electrons, i.e., from the square of the instantaneous signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). This quantity is computed from data provided by the correlator in the Gun-Detector Electronics that also generates the coding pattern imposed on the outgoing beams. If the squared SNR ratio exceeds a threshold, this is taken as evidence that the beam is returning to the detector. The thresholds for SNR are chosen dependent on background fluxes. They represent a compromise between getting false hits (induced by strong variations in background electron fluxes) and missing true beam hits. The basic software loop that controls EDI operations is executed every 2 ms. As the times when the beams hit their detectors are neither synchronized with the telemetry nor equidistant, EDI data have no fixed time-resolution. Data are reported in telemetry slots. In Survey, using the standard packing mode 0, there are eight telemetry slots per second and Gyn Detector Unit (GDU). The last beam detected during the previous slot will be reported in the current slot. If no beam has been detected, the data quality will be set to zero. In Burst telemetry there are 128 slots per second and GDU. The data in each slot consists of information regarding the beam firing directions (stored in the form of analytic gun deflection voltages), times-of-flight (if successfully measured), quality indicators, time stamps of the beam hits, and some auxiliary correlator-related information. Whenever EDI is not in electron drift mode, it uses its ambient electron mode. The mode has the capability to sample at either 90 degrees pitch angle or at 0/180 degrees (field aligned), or to alternate between 90 degrees and field aligned with selectable dwell times. While all options have been demonstrated during the commissioning phase, only the field aligned mode has been used in the routine operations phase. The choices for energy are 250 eV, 500 eV, and 1 keV. The two detectors, which are facing opposite hemispheres, are looking strictly into opposite directions, so while one detector is looking along B the other is looking antiparallel to B (corresponding to pitch angles of 180 and 0 degrees, respectively). The two detectors switch roles every half spin of the spacecraft as the tip of the magnetic field vector spins outside the field of view of one detector and into the field of view of the other detector. Starting January 4, 2016, the anodes were chosen such that the projection of the magnetic field vector was best aligned with the center of the first (that is, outer) of the four anodes. This provides coverage of a larger range of pitch angles in general. Data taken in this configuration are identified by the term "amb-pm2" in the data product names. In the burst data where four channels (corresponding to the four adjacent sensor anode pads) are sampled per GDU, channel 1 represents best the pitch angle of 0 degrees (or 180 degrees). The EDI instrument paper can be found at: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs11214-015-0182-7. The EDI instrument data products guide can be found at https://lasp.colorado.edu/mms/sdc/public/datasets/fields/.

21) MMS 2 Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Electric Field, Level 2, Burst Survey maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VSPO/NumericalData/MMS/2/FIELDS/EDI/Burst/Level2/ElectricField/PT0.0009765625S
Start:2015-09-14 14:13:04 Observatory:MMS-2 Cadence:0.0009765625 seconds
Stop:2016-09-14 08:00:02 Instrument:MMS 2 FIELDS Suite, Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Resource:NumericalData
Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Electric Field Burst Survey, Level 2, 0.0009765625 s Data (1024 samples/s). EDI has two scientific data acquisition modes, called electric field mode and ambient mode. In electric field mode, two coded electron beams are emitted such that they return to the detectors after one or more gyrations in the ambient magnetic and electric field. The firing directions and times-of-flight allow the derivation of the drift velocity and electric field. In ambient mode, the electron beams are not used. The detectors with their large geometric factors and their ability to adjust the field of view quickly allow continuous sampling of ambient electrons at a selected pitch angle and fixed but selectable energy. To find the beam directions that will hit the detector, EDI sweeps each beam in the plane perpendicular to B at a fixed angular rate of 0.22 /ms until a signal has been acquired by the detector. Once signal has been acquired, the beams are swept back and forth to stay on target. Beam detection is not determined from the changes in the count-rates directly, but from the square of the beam counts divided by the background counts from ambient electrons, i.e., from the square of the instantaneous signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). This quantity is computed from data provided by the correlator in the Gun-Detector Electronics that also generates the coding pattern imposed on the outgoing beams. If the squared SNR ratio exceeds a threshold, this is taken as evidence that the beam is returning to the detector. The thresholds for SNR are chosen dependent on background fluxes. They represent a compromise between getting false hits (induced by strong variations in background electron fluxes) and missing true beam hits. The basic software loop that controls EDI operations is executed every 2 ms. As the times when the beams hit their detectors are neither synchronized with the telemetry nor equidistant, EDI data have no fixed time-resolution. Data are reported in telemetry slots. In Survey, using the standard packing mode 0, there are eight telemetry slots per second and Gyn Detector Unit (GDU). The last beam detected during the previous slot will be reported in the current slot. If no beam has been detected, the data quality will be set to zero. In Burst telemetry there are 128 slots per second and GDU. The data in each slot consists of information regarding the beam firing directions (stored in the form of analytic gun deflection voltages), times-of-flight (if successfully measured), quality indicators, time stamps of the beam hits, and some auxiliary correlator-related information. Whenever EDI is not in electron drift mode, it uses its ambient electron mode. The mode has the capability to sample at either 90 degrees pitch angle or at 0/180 degrees (field aligned), or to alternate between 90 degrees and field aligned with selectable dwell times. While all options have been demonstrated during the commissioning phase, only the field aligned mode has been used in the routine operations phase. The choices for energy are 250 eV, 500 eV, and 1 keV. The two detectors, which are facing opposite hemispheres, are looking strictly into opposite directions, so while one detector is looking along B the other is looking antiparallel to B (corresponding to pitch angles of 180 and 0 degrees, respectively). The two detectors switch roles every half spin of the spacecraft as the tip of the magnetic field vector spins outside the field of view of one detector and into the field of view of the other detector. This is the primary data product generated from data collected in electric field mode. The science data generated are drift velocity and electric field data in various coordinate systems. They are derived from triangulation and/or time-of-flight analysis. Where both methods are applicable, their results will be combined using a weighting approach based on their relative errors. The EDI instrument paper can be found at: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs11214-015-0182-7. The EDI instrument data products guide can be found at https://lasp.colorado.edu/mms/sdc/public/datasets/fields/.

22) MMS 2 Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Ambient Electron Flux, Projection Method 1 (PM1), Level 2, Burst Survey maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VSPO/NumericalData/MMS/2/FIELDS/EDI/Burst/Level2/ElectronFluxAmbient/ProjectionMethod1/PT0.0009765625S
Start:2015-09-01 12:11:14 Observatory:MMS-2 Cadence:0.0009765625 seconds
Stop:2016-09-14 08:00:02 Instrument:MMS 2 FIELDS Suite, Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Resource:NumericalData
Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Ambient Burst Survey, Level 2, 0.0009765625 s Data (1024 samples/s). EDI has two scientific data acquisition modes, called electric field mode and ambient mode. In electric field mode, two coded electron beams are emitted such that they return to the detectors after one or more gyrations in the ambient magnetic and electric field. The firing directions and times-of-flight allow the derivation of the drift velocity and electric field. In ambient mode, the electron beams are not used. The detectors with their large geometric factors and their ability to adjust the field of view quickly allow continuous sampling of ambient electrons at a selected pitch angle and fixed but selectable energy. To find the beam directions that will hit the detector, EDI sweeps each beam in the plane perpendicular to B at a fixed angular rate of 0.22 /ms until a signal has been acquired by the detector. Once signal has been acquired, the beams are swept back and forth to stay on target. Beam detection is not determined from the changes in the count-rates directly, but from the square of the beam counts divided by the background counts from ambient electrons, i.e., from the square of the instantaneous signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). This quantity is computed from data provided by the correlator in the Gun-Detector Electronics that also generates the coding pattern imposed on the outgoing beams. If the squared SNR ratio exceeds a threshold, this is taken as evidence that the beam is returning to the detector. The thresholds for SNR are chosen dependent on background fluxes. They represent a compromise between getting false hits (induced by strong variations in background electron fluxes) and missing true beam hits. The basic software loop that controls EDI operations is executed every 2 ms. As the times when the beams hit their detectors are neither synchronized with the telemetry nor equidistant, EDI data have no fixed time-resolution. Data are reported in telemetry slots. In Survey, using the standard packing mode 0, there are eight telemetry slots per second and Gyn Detector Unit (GDU). The last beam detected during the previous slot will be reported in the current slot. If no beam has been detected, the data quality will be set to zero. In Burst telemetry there are 128 slots per second and GDU. The data in each slot consists of information regarding the beam firing directions (stored in the form of analytic gun deflection voltages), times-of-flight (if successfully measured), quality indicators, time stamps of the beam hits, and some auxiliary correlator-related information. Whenever EDI is not in electron drift mode, it uses its ambient electron mode. The mode has the capability to sample at either 90 degrees pitch angle or at 0/180 degrees (field aligned), or to alternate between 90 degrees and field aligned with selectable dwell times. While all options have been demonstrated during the commissioning phase, only the field aligned mode has been used in the routine operations phase. The choices for energy are 250 eV, 500 eV, and 1 keV. The two detectors, which are facing opposite hemispheres, are looking strictly into opposite directions, so while one detector is looking along B the other is looking antiparallel to B (corresponding to pitch angles of 180 and 0 degrees, respectively). The two detectors switch roles every half spin of the spacecraft as the tip of the magnetic field vector spins outside the field of view of one detector and into the field of view of the other detector. Up until January 4, 2016 the anodes were chosen such that the magnetic field vector projected into the plane of the micro-channel plate entry surface was best aligned with the center of the four anodes ( that is, with the gap between the inner two of the four anodes). Data taken in this configuration are using the term "amb" in the data product names. In the burst data where four channels (corresponding to the four adjacent sensor anode pads) are sampled per GDU, the average (or sum) of the center two channels (channels 2 and 3) represents best the pitch angle of 0 degrees (or 180 degrees). The EDI instrument paper can be found at: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs11214-015-0182-7. The EDI instrument data products guide can be found at https://lasp.colorado.edu/mms/sdc/public/datasets/fields/.

23) MMS 2 Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Quality 0 Counts, Level 2, Burst Survey maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VSPO/NumericalData/MMS/2/FIELDS/EDI/Burst/Level2/QualityZero/PT0.0078125S
Start:2015-09-14 13:58:04 Observatory:MMS-2 Cadence:0.0078125 seconds
Stop:2016-09-14 08:00:02 Instrument:MMS 2 FIELDS Suite, Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Resource:NumericalData
Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Q0 Burst Survey, Level 2, 0.0078125 s Data (128 samples/s). EDI has two scientific data acquisition modes, called electric field mode and ambient mode. In electric field mode, two coded electron beams are emitted such that they return to the detectors after one or more gyrations in the ambient magnetic and electric field. The firing directions and times-of-flight allow the derivation of the drift velocity and electric field. In ambient mode, the electron beams are not used. The detectors with their large geometric factors and their ability to adjust the field of view quickly allow continuous sampling of ambient electrons at a selected pitch angle and fixed but selectable energy. To find the beam directions that will hit the detector, EDI sweeps each beam in the plane perpendicular to B at a fixed angular rate of 0.22 /ms until a signal has been acquired by the detector. Once signal has been acquired, the beams are swept back and forth to stay on target. Beam detection is not determined from the changes in the count-rates directly, but from the square of the beam counts divided by the background counts from ambient electrons, i.e., from the square of the instantaneous signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). This quantity is computed from data provided by the correlator in the Gun-Detector Electronics that also generates the coding pattern imposed on the outgoing beams. If the squared SNR ratio exceeds a threshold, this is taken as evidence that the beam is returning to the detector. The thresholds for SNR are chosen dependent on background fluxes. They represent a compromise between getting false hits (induced by strong variations in background electron fluxes) and missing true beam hits. The basic software loop that controls EDI operations is executed every 2 ms. As the times when the beams hit their detectors are neither synchronized with the telemetry nor equidistant, EDI data have no fixed time-resolution. Data are reported in telemetry slots. In Survey, using the standard packing mode 0, there are eight telemetry slots per second and Gyn Detector Unit (GDU). The last beam detected during the previous slot will be reported in the current slot. If no beam has been detected, the data quality will be set to zero. In Burst telemetry there are 128 slots per second and GDU. The data in each slot consists of information regarding the beam firing directions (stored in the form of analytic gun deflection voltages), times-of-flight (if successfully measured), quality indicators, time stamps of the beam hits, and some auxiliary correlator-related information. Whenever EDI is not in electron drift mode, it uses its ambient electron mode. The mode has the capability to sample at either 90 degrees pitch angle or at 0/180 degrees (field aligned), or to alternate between 90 degrees and field aligned with selectable dwell times. While all options have been demonstrated during the commissioning phase, only the field aligned mode has been used in the routine operations phase. The choices for energy are 250 eV, 500 eV, and 1 keV. The two detectors, which are facing opposite hemispheres, are looking strictly into opposite directions, so while one detector is looking along B the other is looking antiparallel to B (corresponding to pitch angles of 180 and 0 degrees, respectively). The two detectors switch roles every half spin of the spacecraft as the tip of the magnetic field vector spins outside the field of view of one detector and into the field of view of the other detector. These data are a by-product generated from data collected in electric field mode. Whenever no return beam is found in a particular time slot by the flight software to be reported will be flagged with the lowest quality level (quality zero). The ground processing generates a separate data product from these counts data. The EDI instrument paper can be found at: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs11214-015-0182-7. The EDI instrument data products guide can be found at https://lasp.colorado.edu/mms/sdc/public/datasets/fields/.

24) MMS 2 Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Electric Field, Level 2, Quick-Look Survey maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VSPO/NumericalData/MMS/2/FIELDS/EDI/Survey/Level2/ElectricField/PT5S
Start:2015-09-01 00:00:00 Observatory:MMS-2 Cadence:5 seconds
Stop:2016-09-14 08:00:01 Instrument:MMS 2 FIELDS Suite, Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Resource:NumericalData
Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Electric Field Survey, Level 2, 5 s Data. EDI has two scientific data acquisition modes, called electric field mode and ambient mode. In electric field mode, two coded electron beams are emitted such that they return to the detectors after one or more gyrations in the ambient magnetic and electric field. The firing directions and times-of-flight allow the derivation of the drift velocity and electric field. In ambient mode, the electron beams are not used. The detectors with their large geometric factors and their ability to adjust the field of view quickly allow continuous sampling of ambient electrons at a selected pitch angle and fixed but selectable energy. To find the beam directions that will hit the detector, EDI sweeps each beam in the plane perpendicular to B at a fixed angular rate of 0.22 /ms until a signal has been acquired by the detector. Once signal has been acquired, the beams are swept back and forth to stay on target. Beam detection is not determined from the changes in the count-rates directly, but from the square of the beam counts divided by the background counts from ambient electrons, i.e., from the square of the instantaneous signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). This quantity is computed from data provided by the correlator in the Gun-Detector Electronics that also generates the coding pattern imposed on the outgoing beams. If the squared SNR ratio exceeds a threshold, this is taken as evidence that the beam is returning to the detector. The thresholds for SNR are chosen dependent on background fluxes. They represent a compromise between getting false hits (induced by strong variations in background electron fluxes) and missing true beam hits. The basic software loop that controls EDI operations is executed every 2 ms. As the times when the beams hit their detectors are neither synchronized with the telemetry nor equidistant, EDI data have no fixed time-resolution. Data are reported in telemetry slots. In Survey, using the standard packing mode 0, there are eight telemetry slots per second and Gyn Detector Unit (GDU). The last beam detected during the previous slot will be reported in the current slot. If no beam has been detected, the data quality will be set to zero. In Burst telemetry there are 128 slots per second and GDU. The data in each slot consists of information regarding the beam firing directions (stored in the form of analytic gun deflection voltages), times-of-flight (if successfully measured), quality indicators, time stamps of the beam hits, and some auxiliary correlator-related information. Whenever EDI is not in electron drift mode, it uses its ambient electron mode. The mode has the capability to sample at either 90 degrees pitch angle or at 0/180 degrees (field aligned), or to alternate between 90 degrees and field aligned with selectable dwell times. While all options have been demonstrated during the commissioning phase, only the field aligned mode has been used in the routine operations phase. The choices for energy are 250 eV, 500 eV, and 1 keV. The two detectors, which are facing opposite hemispheres, are looking strictly into opposite directions, so while one detector is looking along B the other is looking antiparallel to B (corresponding to pitch angles of 180 and 0 degrees, respectively). The two detectors switch roles every half spin of the spacecraft as the tip of the magnetic field vector spins outside the field of view of one detector and into the field of view of the other detector. This is the primary data product generated from data collected in electric field mode. The science data generated are drift velocity and electric field data in various coordinate systems. They are derived from triangulation and/or time-of-flight analysis. Where both methods are applicable, their results will be combined using a weighting approach based on their relative errors. The EDI instrument paper can be found at: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs11214-015-0182-7. The EDI instrument data products guide can be found at https://lasp.colorado.edu/mms/sdc/public/datasets/fields/.

25) MMS 2 Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Ambient Electron Flux, Projection Method 1 (PM1), Level 2, Quick-Look Survey maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VSPO/NumericalData/MMS/2/FIELDS/EDI/Survey/Level2/ElectronFluxAmbient/ProjectionMethod1/PT0.03125S
Start:2015-09-01 00:00:00 Observatory:MMS-2 Cadence:0.03125 seconds
Stop:2016-09-14 08:00:01 Instrument:MMS 2 FIELDS Suite, Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Resource:NumericalData
Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Ambient Survey, Level 2, 0.03125 s Data. (32 samples/s)EDI has two scientific data acquisition modes, called electric field mode and ambient mode. In electric field mode, two coded electron beams are emitted such that they return to the detectors after one or more gyrations in the ambient magnetic and electric field. The firing directions and times-of-flight allow the derivation of the drift velocity and electric field. In ambient mode, the electron beams are not used. The detectors with their large geometric factors and their ability to adjust the field of view quickly allow continuous sampling of ambient electrons at a selected pitch angle and fixed but selectable energy. To find the beam directions that will hit the detector, EDI sweeps each beam in the plane perpendicular to B at a fixed angular rate of 0.22 /ms until a signal has been acquired by the detector. Once signal has been acquired, the beams are swept back and forth to stay on target. Beam detection is not determined from the changes in the count-rates directly, but from the square of the beam counts divided by the background counts from ambient electrons, i.e., from the square of the instantaneous signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). This quantity is computed from data provided by the correlator in the Gun-Detector Electronics that also generates the coding pattern imposed on the outgoing beams. If the squared SNR ratio exceeds a threshold, this is taken as evidence that the beam is returning to the detector. The thresholds for SNR are chosen dependent on background fluxes. They represent a compromise between getting false hits (induced by strong variations in background electron fluxes) and missing true beam hits. The basic software loop that controls EDI operations is executed every 2 ms. As the times when the beams hit their detectors are neither synchronized with the telemetry nor equidistant, EDI data have no fixed time-resolution. Data are reported in telemetry slots. In Survey, using the standard packing mode 0, there are eight telemetry slots per second and Gyn Detector Unit (GDU). The last beam detected during the previous slot will be reported in the current slot. If no beam has been detected, the data quality will be set to zero. In Burst telemetry there are 128 slots per second and GDU. The data in each slot consists of information regarding the beam firing directions (stored in the form of analytic gun deflection voltages), times-of-flight (if successfully measured), quality indicators, time stamps of the beam hits, and some auxiliary correlator-related information. Whenever EDI is not in electron drift mode, it uses its ambient electron mode. The mode has the capability to sample at either 90 degrees pitch angle or at 0/180 degrees (field aligned), or to alternate between 90 degrees and field aligned with selectable dwell times. While all options have been demonstrated during the commissioning phase, only the field aligned mode has been used in the routine operations phase. The choices for energy are 250 eV, 500 eV, and 1 keV. The two detectors, which are facing opposite hemispheres, are looking strictly into opposite directions, so while one detector is looking along B the other is looking antiparallel to B (corresponding to pitch angles of 180 and 0 degrees, respectively). The two detectors switch roles every half spin of the spacecraft as the tip of the magnetic field vector spins outside the field of view of one detector and into the field of view of the other detector. Up until January 4, 2016 the anodes were chosen such that the magnetic field vector projected into the plane of the micro-channel plate entry surface was best aligned with the center of the four anodes ( that is, with the gap between the inner two of the four anodes). Data taken in this configuration are using the term "amb" in the data product names. In the burst data where four channels (corresponding to the four adjacent sensor anode pads) are sampled per GDU, the average (or sum) of the center two channels (channels 2 and 3) represents best the pitch angle of 0 degrees (or 180 degrees). The EDI instrument paper can be found at: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs11214-015-0182-7. The EDI instrument data products guide can be found at https://lasp.colorado.edu/mms/sdc/public/datasets/fields/.

26) MMS 2 Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Ambient Electron Flux, Projection Method 2 (PM2), Level 2, Quick-Look Survey maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VSPO/NumericalData/MMS/2/FIELDS/EDI/Survey/Level2/ElectronFluxAmbient/ProjectionMethod2/PT0.03125S
Start:2016-01-05 00:00:00 Observatory:MMS-2 Cadence:0.03125 seconds
Stop:2016-09-14 08:00:01 Instrument:MMS 2 FIELDS Suite, Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Resource:NumericalData
Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Ambient Survey, Level 2, 0.03125 s Data (32 samples/s). EDI has two scientific data acquisition modes, called electric field mode and ambient mode. In electric field mode, two coded electron beams are emitted such that they return to the detectors after one or more gyrations in the ambient magnetic and electric field. The firing directions and times-of-flight allow the derivation of the drift velocity and electric field. In ambient mode, the electron beams are not used. The detectors with their large geometric factors and their ability to adjust the field of view quickly allow continuous sampling of ambient electrons at a selected pitch angle and fixed but selectable energy. To find the beam directions that will hit the detector, EDI sweeps each beam in the plane perpendicular to B at a fixed angular rate of 0.22 /ms until a signal has been acquired by the detector. Once signal has been acquired, the beams are swept back and forth to stay on target. Beam detection is not determined from the changes in the count-rates directly, but from the square of the beam counts divided by the background counts from ambient electrons, i.e., from the square of the instantaneous signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). This quantity is computed from data provided by the correlator in the Gun-Detector Electronics that also generates the coding pattern imposed on the outgoing beams. If the squared SNR ratio exceeds a threshold, this is taken as evidence that the beam is returning to the detector. The thresholds for SNR are chosen dependent on background fluxes. They represent a compromise between getting false hits (induced by strong variations in background electron fluxes) and missing true beam hits. The basic software loop that controls EDI operations is executed every 2 ms. As the times when the beams hit their detectors are neither synchronized with the telemetry nor equidistant, EDI data have no fixed time-resolution. Data are reported in telemetry slots. In Survey, using the standard packing mode 0, there are eight telemetry slots per second and Gyn Detector Unit (GDU). The last beam detected during the previous slot will be reported in the current slot. If no beam has been detected, the data quality will be set to zero. In Burst telemetry there are 128 slots per second and GDU. The data in each slot consists of information regarding the beam firing directions (stored in the form of analytic gun deflection voltages), times-of-flight (if successfully measured), quality indicators, time stamps of the beam hits, and some auxiliary correlator-related information. Whenever EDI is not in electron drift mode, it uses its ambient electron mode. The mode has the capability to sample at either 90 degrees pitch angle or at 0/180 degrees (field aligned), or to alternate between 90 degrees and field aligned with selectable dwell times. While all options have been demonstrated during the commissioning phase, only the field aligned mode has been used in the routine operations phase. The choices for energy are 250 eV, 500 eV, and 1 keV. The two detectors, which are facing opposite hemispheres, are looking strictly into opposite directions, so while one detector is looking along B the other is looking antiparallel to B (corresponding to pitch angles of 180 and 0 degrees, respectively). The two detectors switch roles every half spin of the spacecraft as the tip of the magnetic field vector spins outside the field of view of one detector and into the field of view of the other detector. Starting January 4, 2016, the anodes were chosen such that the projection of the magnetic field vector was best aligned with the center of the first (that is, outer) of the four anodes. This provides coverage of a larger range of pitch angles in general. Data taken in this configuration are identified by the term "amb-pm2" in the data product names. In the burst data where four channels (corresponding to the four adjacent sensor anode pads) are sampled per GDU, channel 1 represents best the pitch angle of 0 degrees (or 180 degrees). The EDI instrument paper can be found at: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs11214-015-0182-7. The EDI instrument data products guide can be found at https://lasp.colorado.edu/mms/sdc/public/datasets/fields/.

27) MMS 2 Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Quality Zero Counts, Level 2, Quick-Look Survey maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VSPO/NumericalData/MMS/2/FIELDS/EDI/Survey/Level2/QualityZero/PT0.125S
Start:2015-04-21 00:00:00 Observatory:MMS-2 Cadence:0.125 seconds
Stop:2016-09-14 08:00:02 Instrument:MMS 2 FIELDS Suite, Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Resource:NumericalData
Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Q0 Survey, Level 2, 0.125 s Data (8 samples/s). EDI has two scientific data acquisition modes, called electric field mode and ambient mode. In electric field mode, two coded electron beams are emitted such that they return to the detectors after one or more gyrations in the ambient magnetic and electric field. The firing directions and times-of-flight allow the derivation of the drift velocity and electric field. In ambient mode, the electron beams are not used. The detectors with their large geometric factors and their ability to adjust the field of view quickly allow continuous sampling of ambient electrons at a selected pitch angle and fixed but selectable energy. To find the beam directions that will hit the detector, EDI sweeps each beam in the plane perpendicular to B at a fixed angular rate of 0.22 /ms until a signal has been acquired by the detector. Once signal has been acquired, the beams are swept back and forth to stay on target. Beam detection is not determined from the changes in the count-rates directly, but from the square of the beam counts divided by the background counts from ambient electrons, i.e., from the square of the instantaneous signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). This quantity is computed from data provided by the correlator in the Gun-Detector Electronics that also generates the coding pattern imposed on the outgoing beams. If the squared SNR ratio exceeds a threshold, this is taken as evidence that the beam is returning to the detector. The thresholds for SNR are chosen dependent on background fluxes. They represent a compromise between getting false hits (induced by strong variations in background electron fluxes) and missing true beam hits. The basic software loop that controls EDI operations is executed every 2 ms. As the times when the beams hit their detectors are neither synchronized with the telemetry nor equidistant, EDI data have no fixed time-resolution. Data are reported in telemetry slots. In Survey, using the standard packing mode 0, there are eight telemetry slots per second and Gyn Detector Unit (GDU). The last beam detected during the previous slot will be reported in the current slot. If no beam has been detected, the data quality will be set to zero. In Burst telemetry there are 128 slots per second and GDU. The data in each slot consists of information regarding the beam firing directions (stored in the form of analytic gun deflection voltages), times-of-flight (if successfully measured), quality indicators, time stamps of the beam hits, and some auxiliary correlator-related information. Whenever EDI is not in electron drift mode, it uses its ambient electron mode. The mode has the capability to sample at either 90 degrees pitch angle or at 0/180 degrees (field aligned), or to alternate between 90 degrees and field aligned with selectable dwell times. While all options have been demonstrated during the commissioning phase, only the field aligned mode has been used in the routine operations phase. The choices for energy are 250 eV, 500 eV, and 1 keV. The two detectors, which are facing opposite hemispheres, are looking strictly into opposite directions, so while one detector is looking along B the other is looking antiparallel to B (corresponding to pitch angles of 180 and 0 degrees, respectively). The two detectors switch roles every half spin of the spacecraft as the tip of the magnetic field vector spins outside the field of view of one detector and into the field of view of the other detector. These data are a by-product generated from data collected in electric field mode. Whenever no return beam is found in a particular time slot by the flight software to be reported will be flagged with the lowest quality level (quality zero). The ground processing generates a separate data product from these counts data. The EDI instrument paper can be found at: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs11214-015-0182-7. The EDI instrument data products guide can be found at https://lasp.colorado.edu/mms/sdc/public/datasets/fields/.

28) MMS 3 Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Ambient Electron Flux, Projection Method 2 (PM2), Level 2, Burst Survey maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VSPO/NumericalData/MMS/3/FIELDS/EDI/Burst/Level2/AmbientElectronFlux/ProjectionMethod2/PT0.0009765625S
Start:2016-01-04 22:33:24 Observatory:MMS-3 Cadence:0.0009765625 seconds
Stop:2016-09-14 07:59:53 Instrument:MMS 3 FIELDS Suite, Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Resource:NumericalData
Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Ambient Burst Survey, Level 2, 0.0009765625 s Data (1024 samples/s). EDI has two scientific data acquisition modes, called electric field mode and ambient mode. In electric field mode, two coded electron beams are emitted such that they return to the detectors after one or more gyrations in the ambient magnetic and electric field. The firing directions and times-of-flight allow the derivation of the drift velocity and electric field. In ambient mode, the electron beams are not used. The detectors with their large geometric factors and their ability to adjust the field of view quickly allow continuous sampling of ambient electrons at a selected pitch angle and fixed but selectable energy. To find the beam directions that will hit the detector, EDI sweeps each beam in the plane perpendicular to B at a fixed angular rate of 0.22 /ms until a signal has been acquired by the detector. Once signal has been acquired, the beams are swept back and forth to stay on target. Beam detection is not determined from the changes in the count-rates directly, but from the square of the beam counts divided by the background counts from ambient electrons, i.e., from the square of the instantaneous signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). This quantity is computed from data provided by the correlator in the Gun-Detector Electronics that also generates the coding pattern imposed on the outgoing beams. If the squared SNR ratio exceeds a threshold, this is taken as evidence that the beam is returning to the detector. The thresholds for SNR are chosen dependent on background fluxes. They represent a compromise between getting false hits (induced by strong variations in background electron fluxes) and missing true beam hits. The basic software loop that controls EDI operations is executed every 2 ms. As the times when the beams hit their detectors are neither synchronized with the telemetry nor equidistant, EDI data have no fixed time-resolution. Data are reported in telemetry slots. In Survey, using the standard packing mode 0, there are eight telemetry slots per second and Gyn Detector Unit (GDU). The last beam detected during the previous slot will be reported in the current slot. If no beam has been detected, the data quality will be set to zero. In Burst telemetry there are 128 slots per second and GDU. The data in each slot consists of information regarding the beam firing directions (stored in the form of analytic gun deflection voltages), times-of-flight (if successfully measured), quality indicators, time stamps of the beam hits, and some auxiliary correlator-related information. Whenever EDI is not in electron drift mode, it uses its ambient electron mode. The mode has the capability to sample at either 90 degrees pitch angle or at 0/180 degrees (field aligned), or to alternate between 90 degrees and field aligned with selectable dwell times. While all options have been demonstrated during the commissioning phase, only the field aligned mode has been used in the routine operations phase. The choices for energy are 250 eV, 500 eV, and 1 keV. The two detectors, which are facing opposite hemispheres, are looking strictly into opposite directions, so while one detector is looking along B the other is looking antiparallel to B (corresponding to pitch angles of 180 and 0 degrees, respectively). The two detectors switch roles every half spin of the spacecraft as the tip of the magnetic field vector spins outside the field of view of one detector and into the field of view of the other detector. Starting January 4, 2016, the anodes were chosen such that the projection of the magnetic field vector was best aligned with the center of the first (that is, outer) of the four anodes. This provides coverage of a larger range of pitch angles in general. Data taken in this configuration are identified by the term "amb-pm2" in the data product names. In the burst data where four channels (corresponding to the four adjacent sensor anode pads) are sampled per GDU, channel 1 represents best the pitch angle of 0 degrees (or 180 degrees). The EDI instrument paper can be found at: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs11214-015-0182-7. The EDI instrument data products guide can be found at https://lasp.colorado.edu/mms/sdc/public/datasets/fields/.

29) MMS 3 Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Electric Field, Level 2, Burst Survey maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VSPO/NumericalData/MMS/3/FIELDS/EDI/Burst/Level2/ElectricField/PT0.0009765625S
Start:2015-09-14 14:13:04 Observatory:MMS-3 Cadence:0.0009765625 seconds
Stop:2016-09-14 07:59:53 Instrument:MMS 3 FIELDS Suite, Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Resource:NumericalData
Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Electric Field Burst Survey, Level 2, 0.0009765625 s Data (1024 samples/s). EDI has two scientific data acquisition modes, called electric field mode and ambient mode. In electric field mode, two coded electron beams are emitted such that they return to the detectors after one or more gyrations in the ambient magnetic and electric field. The firing directions and times-of-flight allow the derivation of the drift velocity and electric field. In ambient mode, the electron beams are not used. The detectors with their large geometric factors and their ability to adjust the field of view quickly allow continuous sampling of ambient electrons at a selected pitch angle and fixed but selectable energy. To find the beam directions that will hit the detector, EDI sweeps each beam in the plane perpendicular to B at a fixed angular rate of 0.22 /ms until a signal has been acquired by the detector. Once signal has been acquired, the beams are swept back and forth to stay on target. Beam detection is not determined from the changes in the count-rates directly, but from the square of the beam counts divided by the background counts from ambient electrons, i.e., from the square of the instantaneous signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). This quantity is computed from data provided by the correlator in the Gun-Detector Electronics that also generates the coding pattern imposed on the outgoing beams. If the squared SNR ratio exceeds a threshold, this is taken as evidence that the beam is returning to the detector. The thresholds for SNR are chosen dependent on background fluxes. They represent a compromise between getting false hits (induced by strong variations in background electron fluxes) and missing true beam hits. The basic software loop that controls EDI operations is executed every 2 ms. As the times when the beams hit their detectors are neither synchronized with the telemetry nor equidistant, EDI data have no fixed time-resolution. Data are reported in telemetry slots. In Survey, using the standard packing mode 0, there are eight telemetry slots per second and Gyn Detector Unit (GDU). The last beam detected during the previous slot will be reported in the current slot. If no beam has been detected, the data quality will be set to zero. In Burst telemetry there are 128 slots per second and GDU. The data in each slot consists of information regarding the beam firing directions (stored in the form of analytic gun deflection voltages), times-of-flight (if successfully measured), quality indicators, time stamps of the beam hits, and some auxiliary correlator-related information. Whenever EDI is not in electron drift mode, it uses its ambient electron mode. The mode has the capability to sample at either 90 degrees pitch angle or at 0/180 degrees (field aligned), or to alternate between 90 degrees and field aligned with selectable dwell times. While all options have been demonstrated during the commissioning phase, only the field aligned mode has been used in the routine operations phase. The choices for energy are 250 eV, 500 eV, and 1 keV. The two detectors, which are facing opposite hemispheres, are looking strictly into opposite directions, so while one detector is looking along B the other is looking antiparallel to B (corresponding to pitch angles of 180 and 0 degrees, respectively). The two detectors switch roles every half spin of the spacecraft as the tip of the magnetic field vector spins outside the field of view of one detector and into the field of view of the other detector. This is the primary data product generated from data collected in electric field mode. The science data generated are drift velocity and electric field data in various coordinate systems. They are derived from triangulation and/or time-of-flight analysis. Where both methods are applicable, their results will be combined using a weighting approach based on their relative errors. The EDI instrument paper can be found at: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs11214-015-0182-7. The EDI instrument data products guide can be found at https://lasp.colorado.edu/mms/sdc/public/datasets/fields/.

30) MMS 3 Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Ambient Electron Flux, Projection Method 1 (PM1), Level 2, Burst Survey maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VSPO/NumericalData/MMS/3/FIELDS/EDI/Burst/Level2/ElectronFluxAmbient/ProjectionMethod1/PT0.0009765625S
Start:2015-09-01 12:11:14 Observatory:MMS-3 Cadence:0.0009765625 seconds
Stop:2016-09-14 07:59:53 Instrument:MMS 3 FIELDS Suite, Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Resource:NumericalData
Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Ambient Burst Survey, Level 2, 0.0009765625 s Data (1024 samples/s). EDI has two scientific data acquisition modes, called electric field mode and ambient mode. In electric field mode, two coded electron beams are emitted such that they return to the detectors after one or more gyrations in the ambient magnetic and electric field. The firing directions and times-of-flight allow the derivation of the drift velocity and electric field. In ambient mode, the electron beams are not used. The detectors with their large geometric factors and their ability to adjust the field of view quickly allow continuous sampling of ambient electrons at a selected pitch angle and fixed but selectable energy. To find the beam directions that will hit the detector, EDI sweeps each beam in the plane perpendicular to B at a fixed angular rate of 0.22 /ms until a signal has been acquired by the detector. Once signal has been acquired, the beams are swept back and forth to stay on target. Beam detection is not determined from the changes in the count-rates directly, but from the square of the beam counts divided by the background counts from ambient electrons, i.e., from the square of the instantaneous signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). This quantity is computed from data provided by the correlator in the Gun-Detector Electronics that also generates the coding pattern imposed on the outgoing beams. If the squared SNR ratio exceeds a threshold, this is taken as evidence that the beam is returning to the detector. The thresholds for SNR are chosen dependent on background fluxes. They represent a compromise between getting false hits (induced by strong variations in background electron fluxes) and missing true beam hits. The basic software loop that controls EDI operations is executed every 2 ms. As the times when the beams hit their detectors are neither synchronized with the telemetry nor equidistant, EDI data have no fixed time-resolution. Data are reported in telemetry slots. In Survey, using the standard packing mode 0, there are eight telemetry slots per second and Gyn Detector Unit (GDU). The last beam detected during the previous slot will be reported in the current slot. If no beam has been detected, the data quality will be set to zero. In Burst telemetry there are 128 slots per second and GDU. The data in each slot consists of information regarding the beam firing directions (stored in the form of analytic gun deflection voltages), times-of-flight (if successfully measured), quality indicators, time stamps of the beam hits, and some auxiliary correlator-related information. Whenever EDI is not in electron drift mode, it uses its ambient electron mode. The mode has the capability to sample at either 90 degrees pitch angle or at 0/180 degrees (field aligned), or to alternate between 90 degrees and field aligned with selectable dwell times. While all options have been demonstrated during the commissioning phase, only the field aligned mode has been used in the routine operations phase. The choices for energy are 250 eV, 500 eV, and 1 keV. The two detectors, which are facing opposite hemispheres, are looking strictly into opposite directions, so while one detector is looking along B the other is looking antiparallel to B (corresponding to pitch angles of 180 and 0 degrees, respectively). The two detectors switch roles every half spin of the spacecraft as the tip of the magnetic field vector spins outside the field of view of one detector and into the field of view of the other detector. Up until January 4, 2016 the anodes were chosen such that the magnetic field vector projected into the plane of the micro-channel plate entry surface was best aligned with the center of the four anodes ( that is, with the gap between the inner two of the four anodes). Data taken in this configuration are using the term "amb" in the data product names. In the burst data where four channels (corresponding to the four adjacent sensor anode pads) are sampled per GDU, the average (or sum) of the center two channels (channels 2 and 3) represents best the pitch angle of 0 degrees (or 180 degrees). The EDI instrument paper can be found at: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs11214-015-0182-7. The EDI instrument data products guide can be found at https://lasp.colorado.edu/mms/sdc/public/datasets/fields/.

31) MMS 3 Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Quality 0 Counts, Level 2, Burst Survey maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VSPO/NumericalData/MMS/3/FIELDS/EDI/Burst/Level2/QualityZero/PT0.0078125S
Start:2015-09-14 13:58:04 Observatory:MMS-3 Cadence:0.0078125 seconds
Stop:2016-09-14 07:59:53 Instrument:MMS 3 FIELDS Suite, Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Resource:NumericalData
Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Q0 Burst Survey, Level 2, 0.0078125 s Data (128 samples/s). EDI has two scientific data acquisition modes, called electric field mode and ambient mode. In electric field mode, two coded electron beams are emitted such that they return to the detectors after one or more gyrations in the ambient magnetic and electric field. The firing directions and times-of-flight allow the derivation of the drift velocity and electric field. In ambient mode, the electron beams are not used. The detectors with their large geometric factors and their ability to adjust the field of view quickly allow continuous sampling of ambient electrons at a selected pitch angle and fixed but selectable energy. To find the beam directions that will hit the detector, EDI sweeps each beam in the plane perpendicular to B at a fixed angular rate of 0.22 /ms until a signal has been acquired by the detector. Once signal has been acquired, the beams are swept back and forth to stay on target. Beam detection is not determined from the changes in the count-rates directly, but from the square of the beam counts divided by the background counts from ambient electrons, i.e., from the square of the instantaneous signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). This quantity is computed from data provided by the correlator in the Gun-Detector Electronics that also generates the coding pattern imposed on the outgoing beams. If the squared SNR ratio exceeds a threshold, this is taken as evidence that the beam is returning to the detector. The thresholds for SNR are chosen dependent on background fluxes. They represent a compromise between getting false hits (induced by strong variations in background electron fluxes) and missing true beam hits. The basic software loop that controls EDI operations is executed every 2 ms. As the times when the beams hit their detectors are neither synchronized with the telemetry nor equidistant, EDI data have no fixed time-resolution. Data are reported in telemetry slots. In Survey, using the standard packing mode 0, there are eight telemetry slots per second and Gyn Detector Unit (GDU). The last beam detected during the previous slot will be reported in the current slot. If no beam has been detected, the data quality will be set to zero. In Burst telemetry there are 128 slots per second and GDU. The data in each slot consists of information regarding the beam firing directions (stored in the form of analytic gun deflection voltages), times-of-flight (if successfully measured), quality indicators, time stamps of the beam hits, and some auxiliary correlator-related information. Whenever EDI is not in electron drift mode, it uses its ambient electron mode. The mode has the capability to sample at either 90 degrees pitch angle or at 0/180 degrees (field aligned), or to alternate between 90 degrees and field aligned with selectable dwell times. While all options have been demonstrated during the commissioning phase, only the field aligned mode has been used in the routine operations phase. The choices for energy are 250 eV, 500 eV, and 1 keV. The two detectors, which are facing opposite hemispheres, are looking strictly into opposite directions, so while one detector is looking along B the other is looking antiparallel to B (corresponding to pitch angles of 180 and 0 degrees, respectively). The two detectors switch roles every half spin of the spacecraft as the tip of the magnetic field vector spins outside the field of view of one detector and into the field of view of the other detector. These data are a by-product generated from data collected in electric field mode. Whenever no return beam is found in a particular time slot by the flight software to be reported will be flagged with the lowest quality level (quality zero). The ground processing generates a separate data product from these counts data. The EDI instrument paper can be found at: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs11214-015-0182-7. The EDI instrument data products guide can be found at https://lasp.colorado.edu/mms/sdc/public/datasets/fields/.

32) MMS 3 Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Electric Field, Level 2, Quick-Look Survey maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VSPO/NumericalData/MMS/3/FIELDS/EDI/Survey/Level2/ElectricField/PT5S
Start:2015-09-01 00:00:00 Observatory:MMS-3 Cadence:5 seconds
Stop:2016-09-14 07:59:53 Instrument:MMS 3 FIELDS Suite, Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Resource:NumericalData
Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Electric Field Survey, Level 2, 5 s Data. EDI has two scientific data acquisition modes, called electric field mode and ambient mode. In electric field mode, two coded electron beams are emitted such that they return to the detectors after one or more gyrations in the ambient magnetic and electric field. The firing directions and times-of-flight allow the derivation of the drift velocity and electric field. In ambient mode, the electron beams are not used. The detectors with their large geometric factors and their ability to adjust the field of view quickly allow continuous sampling of ambient electrons at a selected pitch angle and fixed but selectable energy. To find the beam directions that will hit the detector, EDI sweeps each beam in the plane perpendicular to B at a fixed angular rate of 0.22 /ms until a signal has been acquired by the detector. Once signal has been acquired, the beams are swept back and forth to stay on target. Beam detection is not determined from the changes in the count-rates directly, but from the square of the beam counts divided by the background counts from ambient electrons, i.e., from the square of the instantaneous signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). This quantity is computed from data provided by the correlator in the Gun-Detector Electronics that also generates the coding pattern imposed on the outgoing beams. If the squared SNR ratio exceeds a threshold, this is taken as evidence that the beam is returning to the detector. The thresholds for SNR are chosen dependent on background fluxes. They represent a compromise between getting false hits (induced by strong variations in background electron fluxes) and missing true beam hits. The basic software loop that controls EDI operations is executed every 2 ms. As the times when the beams hit their detectors are neither synchronized with the telemetry nor equidistant, EDI data have no fixed time-resolution. Data are reported in telemetry slots. In Survey, using the standard packing mode 0, there are eight telemetry slots per second and Gyn Detector Unit (GDU). The last beam detected during the previous slot will be reported in the current slot. If no beam has been detected, the data quality will be set to zero. In Burst telemetry there are 128 slots per second and GDU. The data in each slot consists of information regarding the beam firing directions (stored in the form of analytic gun deflection voltages), times-of-flight (if successfully measured), quality indicators, time stamps of the beam hits, and some auxiliary correlator-related information. Whenever EDI is not in electron drift mode, it uses its ambient electron mode. The mode has the capability to sample at either 90 degrees pitch angle or at 0/180 degrees (field aligned), or to alternate between 90 degrees and field aligned with selectable dwell times. While all options have been demonstrated during the commissioning phase, only the field aligned mode has been used in the routine operations phase. The choices for energy are 250 eV, 500 eV, and 1 keV. The two detectors, which are facing opposite hemispheres, are looking strictly into opposite directions, so while one detector is looking along B the other is looking antiparallel to B (corresponding to pitch angles of 180 and 0 degrees, respectively). The two detectors switch roles every half spin of the spacecraft as the tip of the magnetic field vector spins outside the field of view of one detector and into the field of view of the other detector. This is the primary data product generated from data collected in electric field mode. The science data generated are drift velocity and electric field data in various coordinate systems. They are derived from triangulation and/or time-of-flight analysis. Where both methods are applicable, their results will be combined using a weighting approach based on their relative errors. The EDI instrument paper can be found at: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs11214-015-0182-7. The EDI instrument data products guide can be found at https://lasp.colorado.edu/mms/sdc/public/datasets/fields/.

33) MMS 3 Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Ambient Electron Flux, Projection Method 1 (PM1), Level 2, Quick-Look Survey maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VSPO/NumericalData/MMS/3/FIELDS/EDI/Survey/Level2/ElectronFluxAmbient/ProjectionMethod1/PT0.03125S
Start:2015-09-01 00:00:00 Observatory:MMS-3 Cadence:0.03125 seconds
Stop:2016-09-14 07:59:53 Instrument:MMS 3 FIELDS Suite, Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Resource:NumericalData
Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Ambient Survey, Level 2, 0.03125 s Data. (32 samples/s)EDI has two scientific data acquisition modes, called electric field mode and ambient mode. In electric field mode, two coded electron beams are emitted such that they return to the detectors after one or more gyrations in the ambient magnetic and electric field. The firing directions and times-of-flight allow the derivation of the drift velocity and electric field. In ambient mode, the electron beams are not used. The detectors with their large geometric factors and their ability to adjust the field of view quickly allow continuous sampling of ambient electrons at a selected pitch angle and fixed but selectable energy. To find the beam directions that will hit the detector, EDI sweeps each beam in the plane perpendicular to B at a fixed angular rate of 0.22 /ms until a signal has been acquired by the detector. Once signal has been acquired, the beams are swept back and forth to stay on target. Beam detection is not determined from the changes in the count-rates directly, but from the square of the beam counts divided by the background counts from ambient electrons, i.e., from the square of the instantaneous signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). This quantity is computed from data provided by the correlator in the Gun-Detector Electronics that also generates the coding pattern imposed on the outgoing beams. If the squared SNR ratio exceeds a threshold, this is taken as evidence that the beam is returning to the detector. The thresholds for SNR are chosen dependent on background fluxes. They represent a compromise between getting false hits (induced by strong variations in background electron fluxes) and missing true beam hits. The basic software loop that controls EDI operations is executed every 2 ms. As the times when the beams hit their detectors are neither synchronized with the telemetry nor equidistant, EDI data have no fixed time-resolution. Data are reported in telemetry slots. In Survey, using the standard packing mode 0, there are eight telemetry slots per second and Gyn Detector Unit (GDU). The last beam detected during the previous slot will be reported in the current slot. If no beam has been detected, the data quality will be set to zero. In Burst telemetry there are 128 slots per second and GDU. The data in each slot consists of information regarding the beam firing directions (stored in the form of analytic gun deflection voltages), times-of-flight (if successfully measured), quality indicators, time stamps of the beam hits, and some auxiliary correlator-related information. Whenever EDI is not in electron drift mode, it uses its ambient electron mode. The mode has the capability to sample at either 90 degrees pitch angle or at 0/180 degrees (field aligned), or to alternate between 90 degrees and field aligned with selectable dwell times. While all options have been demonstrated during the commissioning phase, only the field aligned mode has been used in the routine operations phase. The choices for energy are 250 eV, 500 eV, and 1 keV. The two detectors, which are facing opposite hemispheres, are looking strictly into opposite directions, so while one detector is looking along B the other is looking antiparallel to B (corresponding to pitch angles of 180 and 0 degrees, respectively). The two detectors switch roles every half spin of the spacecraft as the tip of the magnetic field vector spins outside the field of view of one detector and into the field of view of the other detector. Up until January 4, 2016 the anodes were chosen such that the magnetic field vector projected into the plane of the micro-channel plate entry surface was best aligned with the center of the four anodes ( that is, with the gap between the inner two of the four anodes). Data taken in this configuration are using the term "amb" in the data product names. In the burst data where four channels (corresponding to the four adjacent sensor anode pads) are sampled per GDU, the average (or sum) of the center two channels (channels 2 and 3) represents best the pitch angle of 0 degrees (or 180 degrees). The EDI instrument paper can be found at: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs11214-015-0182-7. The EDI instrument data products guide can be found at https://lasp.colorado.edu/mms/sdc/public/datasets/fields/.

34) MMS 3 Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Ambient Electron Flux, Projection Method 2 (PM2), Level 2, Quick-Look Survey maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VSPO/NumericalData/MMS/3/FIELDS/EDI/Survey/Level2/ElectronFluxAmbient/ProjectionMethod2/PT0.03125S
Start:2016-01-05 00:00:00 Observatory:MMS-3 Cadence:0.03125 seconds
Stop:2016-09-14 07:59:53 Instrument:MMS 3 FIELDS Suite, Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Resource:NumericalData
Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Ambient Survey, Level 2, 0.03125 s Data (32 samples/s). EDI has two scientific data acquisition modes, called electric field mode and ambient mode. In electric field mode, two coded electron beams are emitted such that they return to the detectors after one or more gyrations in the ambient magnetic and electric field. The firing directions and times-of-flight allow the derivation of the drift velocity and electric field. In ambient mode, the electron beams are not used. The detectors with their large geometric factors and their ability to adjust the field of view quickly allow continuous sampling of ambient electrons at a selected pitch angle and fixed but selectable energy. To find the beam directions that will hit the detector, EDI sweeps each beam in the plane perpendicular to B at a fixed angular rate of 0.22 /ms until a signal has been acquired by the detector. Once signal has been acquired, the beams are swept back and forth to stay on target. Beam detection is not determined from the changes in the count-rates directly, but from the square of the beam counts divided by the background counts from ambient electrons, i.e., from the square of the instantaneous signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). This quantity is computed from data provided by the correlator in the Gun-Detector Electronics that also generates the coding pattern imposed on the outgoing beams. If the squared SNR ratio exceeds a threshold, this is taken as evidence that the beam is returning to the detector. The thresholds for SNR are chosen dependent on background fluxes. They represent a compromise between getting false hits (induced by strong variations in background electron fluxes) and missing true beam hits. The basic software loop that controls EDI operations is executed every 2 ms. As the times when the beams hit their detectors are neither synchronized with the telemetry nor equidistant, EDI data have no fixed time-resolution. Data are reported in telemetry slots. In Survey, using the standard packing mode 0, there are eight telemetry slots per second and Gyn Detector Unit (GDU). The last beam detected during the previous slot will be reported in the current slot. If no beam has been detected, the data quality will be set to zero. In Burst telemetry there are 128 slots per second and GDU. The data in each slot consists of information regarding the beam firing directions (stored in the form of analytic gun deflection voltages), times-of-flight (if successfully measured), quality indicators, time stamps of the beam hits, and some auxiliary correlator-related information. Whenever EDI is not in electron drift mode, it uses its ambient electron mode. The mode has the capability to sample at either 90 degrees pitch angle or at 0/180 degrees (field aligned), or to alternate between 90 degrees and field aligned with selectable dwell times. While all options have been demonstrated during the commissioning phase, only the field aligned mode has been used in the routine operations phase. The choices for energy are 250 eV, 500 eV, and 1 keV. The two detectors, which are facing opposite hemispheres, are looking strictly into opposite directions, so while one detector is looking along B the other is looking antiparallel to B (corresponding to pitch angles of 180 and 0 degrees, respectively). The two detectors switch roles every half spin of the spacecraft as the tip of the magnetic field vector spins outside the field of view of one detector and into the field of view of the other detector. Starting January 4, 2016, the anodes were chosen such that the projection of the magnetic field vector was best aligned with the center of the first (that is, outer) of the four anodes. This provides coverage of a larger range of pitch angles in general. Data taken in this configuration are identified by the term "amb-pm2" in the data product names. In the burst data where four channels (corresponding to the four adjacent sensor anode pads) are sampled per GDU, channel 1 represents best the pitch angle of 0 degrees (or 180 degrees). The EDI instrument paper can be found at: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs11214-015-0182-7. The EDI instrument data products guide can be found at https://lasp.colorado.edu/mms/sdc/public/datasets/fields/.

35) MMS 3 Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Quality Zero Counts, Level 2, Quick-Look Survey maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VSPO/NumericalData/MMS/3/FIELDS/EDI/Survey/Level2/QualityZero/PT0.125S
Start:2015-04-20 00:00:00 Observatory:MMS-3 Cadence:0.125 seconds
Stop:2016-09-14 07:59:53 Instrument:MMS 3 FIELDS Suite, Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Resource:NumericalData
Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Q0 Survey, Level 2, 0.125 s Data (8 samples/s). EDI has two scientific data acquisition modes, called electric field mode and ambient mode. In electric field mode, two coded electron beams are emitted such that they return to the detectors after one or more gyrations in the ambient magnetic and electric field. The firing directions and times-of-flight allow the derivation of the drift velocity and electric field. In ambient mode, the electron beams are not used. The detectors with their large geometric factors and their ability to adjust the field of view quickly allow continuous sampling of ambient electrons at a selected pitch angle and fixed but selectable energy. To find the beam directions that will hit the detector, EDI sweeps each beam in the plane perpendicular to B at a fixed angular rate of 0.22 /ms until a signal has been acquired by the detector. Once signal has been acquired, the beams are swept back and forth to stay on target. Beam detection is not determined from the changes in the count-rates directly, but from the square of the beam counts divided by the background counts from ambient electrons, i.e., from the square of the instantaneous signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). This quantity is computed from data provided by the correlator in the Gun-Detector Electronics that also generates the coding pattern imposed on the outgoing beams. If the squared SNR ratio exceeds a threshold, this is taken as evidence that the beam is returning to the detector. The thresholds for SNR are chosen dependent on background fluxes. They represent a compromise between getting false hits (induced by strong variations in background electron fluxes) and missing true beam hits. The basic software loop that controls EDI operations is executed every 2 ms. As the times when the beams hit their detectors are neither synchronized with the telemetry nor equidistant, EDI data have no fixed time-resolution. Data are reported in telemetry slots. In Survey, using the standard packing mode 0, there are eight telemetry slots per second and Gyn Detector Unit (GDU). The last beam detected during the previous slot will be reported in the current slot. If no beam has been detected, the data quality will be set to zero. In Burst telemetry there are 128 slots per second and GDU. The data in each slot consists of information regarding the beam firing directions (stored in the form of analytic gun deflection voltages), times-of-flight (if successfully measured), quality indicators, time stamps of the beam hits, and some auxiliary correlator-related information. Whenever EDI is not in electron drift mode, it uses its ambient electron mode. The mode has the capability to sample at either 90 degrees pitch angle or at 0/180 degrees (field aligned), or to alternate between 90 degrees and field aligned with selectable dwell times. While all options have been demonstrated during the commissioning phase, only the field aligned mode has been used in the routine operations phase. The choices for energy are 250 eV, 500 eV, and 1 keV. The two detectors, which are facing opposite hemispheres, are looking strictly into opposite directions, so while one detector is looking along B the other is looking antiparallel to B (corresponding to pitch angles of 180 and 0 degrees, respectively). The two detectors switch roles every half spin of the spacecraft as the tip of the magnetic field vector spins outside the field of view of one detector and into the field of view of the other detector. These data are a by-product generated from data collected in electric field mode. Whenever no return beam is found in a particular time slot by the flight software to be reported will be flagged with the lowest quality level (quality zero). The ground processing generates a separate data product from these counts data. The EDI instrument paper can be found at: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs11214-015-0182-7. The EDI instrument data products guide can be found at https://lasp.colorado.edu/mms/sdc/public/datasets/fields/.

36) MMS 4 Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Ambient Electron Flux, Projection Method 2 (PM2), Level 2, Burst Survey maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VSPO/NumericalData/MMS/4/FIELDS/EDI/Burst/Level2/AmbientElectronFlux/ProjectionMethod2/PT0.0009765625S
Start:2016-01-04 22:33:24 Observatory:MMS-4 Cadence:0.0009765625 seconds
Stop:2016-09-14 07:59:59 Instrument:MMS 4 FIELDS Suite, Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Resource:NumericalData
Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Ambient Burst Survey, Level 2, 0.0009765625 s Data (1024 samples/s). EDI has two scientific data acquisition modes, called electric field mode and ambient mode. In electric field mode, two coded electron beams are emitted such that they return to the detectors after one or more gyrations in the ambient magnetic and electric field. The firing directions and times-of-flight allow the derivation of the drift velocity and electric field. In ambient mode, the electron beams are not used. The detectors with their large geometric factors and their ability to adjust the field of view quickly allow continuous sampling of ambient electrons at a selected pitch angle and fixed but selectable energy. To find the beam directions that will hit the detector, EDI sweeps each beam in the plane perpendicular to B at a fixed angular rate of 0.22 /ms until a signal has been acquired by the detector. Once signal has been acquired, the beams are swept back and forth to stay on target. Beam detection is not determined from the changes in the count-rates directly, but from the square of the beam counts divided by the background counts from ambient electrons, i.e., from the square of the instantaneous signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). This quantity is computed from data provided by the correlator in the Gun-Detector Electronics that also generates the coding pattern imposed on the outgoing beams. If the squared SNR ratio exceeds a threshold, this is taken as evidence that the beam is returning to the detector. The thresholds for SNR are chosen dependent on background fluxes. They represent a compromise between getting false hits (induced by strong variations in background electron fluxes) and missing true beam hits. The basic software loop that controls EDI operations is executed every 2 ms. As the times when the beams hit their detectors are neither synchronized with the telemetry nor equidistant, EDI data have no fixed time-resolution. Data are reported in telemetry slots. In Survey, using the standard packing mode 0, there are eight telemetry slots per second and Gyn Detector Unit (GDU). The last beam detected during the previous slot will be reported in the current slot. If no beam has been detected, the data quality will be set to zero. In Burst telemetry there are 128 slots per second and GDU. The data in each slot consists of information regarding the beam firing directions (stored in the form of analytic gun deflection voltages), times-of-flight (if successfully measured), quality indicators, time stamps of the beam hits, and some auxiliary correlator-related information. Whenever EDI is not in electron drift mode, it uses its ambient electron mode. The mode has the capability to sample at either 90 degrees pitch angle or at 0/180 degrees (field aligned), or to alternate between 90 degrees and field aligned with selectable dwell times. While all options have been demonstrated during the commissioning phase, only the field aligned mode has been used in the routine operations phase. The choices for energy are 250 eV, 500 eV, and 1 keV. The two detectors, which are facing opposite hemispheres, are looking strictly into opposite directions, so while one detector is looking along B the other is looking antiparallel to B (corresponding to pitch angles of 180 and 0 degrees, respectively). The two detectors switch roles every half spin of the spacecraft as the tip of the magnetic field vector spins outside the field of view of one detector and into the field of view of the other detector. Starting January 4, 2016, the anodes were chosen such that the projection of the magnetic field vector was best aligned with the center of the first (that is, outer) of the four anodes. This provides coverage of a larger range of pitch angles in general. Data taken in this configuration are identified by the term "amb-pm2" in the data product names. In the burst data where four channels (corresponding to the four adjacent sensor anode pads) are sampled per GDU, channel 1 represents best the pitch angle of 0 degrees (or 180 degrees). The EDI instrument paper can be found at: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs11214-015-0182-7. The EDI instrument data products guide can be found at https://lasp.colorado.edu/mms/sdc/public/datasets/fields/.

37) MMS 4 Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Electric Field, Level 2, Burst Survey maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VSPO/NumericalData/MMS/4/FIELDS/EDI/Burst/Level2/ElectricField/PT0.0009765625S
Start:2015-09-14 14:16:34 Observatory:MMS-4 Cadence:0.0009765625 seconds
Stop:2016-09-14 07:59:59 Instrument:MMS 4 FIELDS Suite, Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Resource:NumericalData
Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Electric Field Burst Survey, Level 2, 0.0009765625 s Data (1024 samples/s). EDI has two scientific data acquisition modes, called electric field mode and ambient mode. In electric field mode, two coded electron beams are emitted such that they return to the detectors after one or more gyrations in the ambient magnetic and electric field. The firing directions and times-of-flight allow the derivation of the drift velocity and electric field. In ambient mode, the electron beams are not used. The detectors with their large geometric factors and their ability to adjust the field of view quickly allow continuous sampling of ambient electrons at a selected pitch angle and fixed but selectable energy. To find the beam directions that will hit the detector, EDI sweeps each beam in the plane perpendicular to B at a fixed angular rate of 0.22 /ms until a signal has been acquired by the detector. Once signal has been acquired, the beams are swept back and forth to stay on target. Beam detection is not determined from the changes in the count-rates directly, but from the square of the beam counts divided by the background counts from ambient electrons, i.e., from the square of the instantaneous signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). This quantity is computed from data provided by the correlator in the Gun-Detector Electronics that also generates the coding pattern imposed on the outgoing beams. If the squared SNR ratio exceeds a threshold, this is taken as evidence that the beam is returning to the detector. The thresholds for SNR are chosen dependent on background fluxes. They represent a compromise between getting false hits (induced by strong variations in background electron fluxes) and missing true beam hits. The basic software loop that controls EDI operations is executed every 2 ms. As the times when the beams hit their detectors are neither synchronized with the telemetry nor equidistant, EDI data have no fixed time-resolution. Data are reported in telemetry slots. In Survey, using the standard packing mode 0, there are eight telemetry slots per second and Gyn Detector Unit (GDU). The last beam detected during the previous slot will be reported in the current slot. If no beam has been detected, the data quality will be set to zero. In Burst telemetry there are 128 slots per second and GDU. The data in each slot consists of information regarding the beam firing directions (stored in the form of analytic gun deflection voltages), times-of-flight (if successfully measured), quality indicators, time stamps of the beam hits, and some auxiliary correlator-related information. Whenever EDI is not in electron drift mode, it uses its ambient electron mode. The mode has the capability to sample at either 90 degrees pitch angle or at 0/180 degrees (field aligned), or to alternate between 90 degrees and field aligned with selectable dwell times. While all options have been demonstrated during the commissioning phase, only the field aligned mode has been used in the routine operations phase. The choices for energy are 250 eV, 500 eV, and 1 keV. The two detectors, which are facing opposite hemispheres, are looking strictly into opposite directions, so while one detector is looking along B the other is looking antiparallel to B (corresponding to pitch angles of 180 and 0 degrees, respectively). The two detectors switch roles every half spin of the spacecraft as the tip of the magnetic field vector spins outside the field of view of one detector and into the field of view of the other detector. This is the primary data product generated from data collected in electric field mode. The science data generated are drift velocity and electric field data in various coordinate systems. They are derived from triangulation and/or time-of-flight analysis. Where both methods are applicable, their results will be combined using a weighting approach based on their relative errors. The EDI instrument paper can be found at: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs11214-015-0182-7. The EDI instrument data products guide can be found at https://lasp.colorado.edu/mms/sdc/public/datasets/fields/.

38) MMS 4 Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Ambient Electron Flux, Projection Method 1 (PM1), Level 2, Burst Survey maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VSPO/NumericalData/MMS/4/FIELDS/EDI/Burst/Level2/ElectronFluxAmbient/ProjectionMethod1/PT0.0009765625S
Start:2015-09-02 13:39:04 Observatory:MMS-4 Cadence:0.0009765625 seconds
Stop:2016-09-14 07:59:59 Instrument:MMS 4 FIELDS Suite, Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Resource:NumericalData
Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Ambient Burst Survey, Level 2, 0.0009765625 s Data (1024 samples/s). EDI has two scientific data acquisition modes, called electric field mode and ambient mode. In electric field mode, two coded electron beams are emitted such that they return to the detectors after one or more gyrations in the ambient magnetic and electric field. The firing directions and times-of-flight allow the derivation of the drift velocity and electric field. In ambient mode, the electron beams are not used. The detectors with their large geometric factors and their ability to adjust the field of view quickly allow continuous sampling of ambient electrons at a selected pitch angle and fixed but selectable energy. To find the beam directions that will hit the detector, EDI sweeps each beam in the plane perpendicular to B at a fixed angular rate of 0.22 /ms until a signal has been acquired by the detector. Once signal has been acquired, the beams are swept back and forth to stay on target. Beam detection is not determined from the changes in the count-rates directly, but from the square of the beam counts divided by the background counts from ambient electrons, i.e., from the square of the instantaneous signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). This quantity is computed from data provided by the correlator in the Gun-Detector Electronics that also generates the coding pattern imposed on the outgoing beams. If the squared SNR ratio exceeds a threshold, this is taken as evidence that the beam is returning to the detector. The thresholds for SNR are chosen dependent on background fluxes. They represent a compromise between getting false hits (induced by strong variations in background electron fluxes) and missing true beam hits. The basic software loop that controls EDI operations is executed every 2 ms. As the times when the beams hit their detectors are neither synchronized with the telemetry nor equidistant, EDI data have no fixed time-resolution. Data are reported in telemetry slots. In Survey, using the standard packing mode 0, there are eight telemetry slots per second and Gyn Detector Unit (GDU). The last beam detected during the previous slot will be reported in the current slot. If no beam has been detected, the data quality will be set to zero. In Burst telemetry there are 128 slots per second and GDU. The data in each slot consists of information regarding the beam firing directions (stored in the form of analytic gun deflection voltages), times-of-flight (if successfully measured), quality indicators, time stamps of the beam hits, and some auxiliary correlator-related information. Whenever EDI is not in electron drift mode, it uses its ambient electron mode. The mode has the capability to sample at either 90 degrees pitch angle or at 0/180 degrees (field aligned), or to alternate between 90 degrees and field aligned with selectable dwell times. While all options have been demonstrated during the commissioning phase, only the field aligned mode has been used in the routine operations phase. The choices for energy are 250 eV, 500 eV, and 1 keV. The two detectors, which are facing opposite hemispheres, are looking strictly into opposite directions, so while one detector is looking along B the other is looking antiparallel to B (corresponding to pitch angles of 180 and 0 degrees, respectively). The two detectors switch roles every half spin of the spacecraft as the tip of the magnetic field vector spins outside the field of view of one detector and into the field of view of the other detector. Up until January 4, 2016 the anodes were chosen such that the magnetic field vector projected into the plane of the micro-channel plate entry surface was best aligned with the center of the four anodes ( that is, with the gap between the inner two of the four anodes). Data taken in this configuration are using the term "amb" in the data product names. In the burst data where four channels (corresponding to the four adjacent sensor anode pads) are sampled per GDU, the average (or sum) of the center two channels (channels 2 and 3) represents best the pitch angle of 0 degrees (or 180 degrees). The EDI instrument paper can be found at: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs11214-015-0182-7. The EDI instrument data products guide can be found at https://lasp.colorado.edu/mms/sdc/public/datasets/fields/.

39) MMS 4 Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Quality 0 Counts, Level 2, Burst Survey maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VSPO/NumericalData/MMS/4/FIELDS/EDI/Burst/Level2/QualityZero/PT0.0078125S
Start:2015-09-14 13:58:04 Observatory:MMS-4 Cadence:0.0078125 seconds
Stop:2016-09-14 07:59:59 Instrument:MMS 4 FIELDS Suite, Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Resource:NumericalData
Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Q0 Burst Survey, Level 2, 0.0078125 s Data (128 samples/s). EDI has two scientific data acquisition modes, called electric field mode and ambient mode. In electric field mode, two coded electron beams are emitted such that they return to the detectors after one or more gyrations in the ambient magnetic and electric field. The firing directions and times-of-flight allow the derivation of the drift velocity and electric field. In ambient mode, the electron beams are not used. The detectors with their large geometric factors and their ability to adjust the field of view quickly allow continuous sampling of ambient electrons at a selected pitch angle and fixed but selectable energy. To find the beam directions that will hit the detector, EDI sweeps each beam in the plane perpendicular to B at a fixed angular rate of 0.22 /ms until a signal has been acquired by the detector. Once signal has been acquired, the beams are swept back and forth to stay on target. Beam detection is not determined from the changes in the count-rates directly, but from the square of the beam counts divided by the background counts from ambient electrons, i.e., from the square of the instantaneous signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). This quantity is computed from data provided by the correlator in the Gun-Detector Electronics that also generates the coding pattern imposed on the outgoing beams. If the squared SNR ratio exceeds a threshold, this is taken as evidence that the beam is returning to the detector. The thresholds for SNR are chosen dependent on background fluxes. They represent a compromise between getting false hits (induced by strong variations in background electron fluxes) and missing true beam hits. The basic software loop that controls EDI operations is executed every 2 ms. As the times when the beams hit their detectors are neither synchronized with the telemetry nor equidistant, EDI data have no fixed time-resolution. Data are reported in telemetry slots. In Survey, using the standard packing mode 0, there are eight telemetry slots per second and Gyn Detector Unit (GDU). The last beam detected during the previous slot will be reported in the current slot. If no beam has been detected, the data quality will be set to zero. In Burst telemetry there are 128 slots per second and GDU. The data in each slot consists of information regarding the beam firing directions (stored in the form of analytic gun deflection voltages), times-of-flight (if successfully measured), quality indicators, time stamps of the beam hits, and some auxiliary correlator-related information. Whenever EDI is not in electron drift mode, it uses its ambient electron mode. The mode has the capability to sample at either 90 degrees pitch angle or at 0/180 degrees (field aligned), or to alternate between 90 degrees and field aligned with selectable dwell times. While all options have been demonstrated during the commissioning phase, only the field aligned mode has been used in the routine operations phase. The choices for energy are 250 eV, 500 eV, and 1 keV. The two detectors, which are facing opposite hemispheres, are looking strictly into opposite directions, so while one detector is looking along B the other is looking antiparallel to B (corresponding to pitch angles of 180 and 0 degrees, respectively). The two detectors switch roles every half spin of the spacecraft as the tip of the magnetic field vector spins outside the field of view of one detector and into the field of view of the other detector. These data are a by-product generated from data collected in electric field mode. Whenever no return beam is found in a particular time slot by the flight software to be reported will be flagged with the lowest quality level (quality zero). The ground processing generates a separate data product from these counts data. The EDI instrument paper can be found at: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs11214-015-0182-7. The EDI instrument data products guide can be found at https://lasp.colorado.edu/mms/sdc/public/datasets/fields/.

40) MMS 4 Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Electric Field, Level 2, Quick-Look Survey maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VSPO/NumericalData/MMS/4/FIELDS/EDI/Survey/Level2/ElectricField/PT5S
Start:2015-09-03 00:00:00 Observatory:MMS-4 Cadence:5 seconds
Stop:2016-09-14 07:59:59 Instrument:MMS 4 FIELDS Suite, Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Resource:NumericalData
Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Electric Field Survey, Level 2, 5 s Data. EDI has two scientific data acquisition modes, called electric field mode and ambient mode. In electric field mode, two coded electron beams are emitted such that they return to the detectors after one or more gyrations in the ambient magnetic and electric field. The firing directions and times-of-flight allow the derivation of the drift velocity and electric field. In ambient mode, the electron beams are not used. The detectors with their large geometric factors and their ability to adjust the field of view quickly allow continuous sampling of ambient electrons at a selected pitch angle and fixed but selectable energy. To find the beam directions that will hit the detector, EDI sweeps each beam in the plane perpendicular to B at a fixed angular rate of 0.22 /ms until a signal has been acquired by the detector. Once signal has been acquired, the beams are swept back and forth to stay on target. Beam detection is not determined from the changes in the count-rates directly, but from the square of the beam counts divided by the background counts from ambient electrons, i.e., from the square of the instantaneous signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). This quantity is computed from data provided by the correlator in the Gun-Detector Electronics that also generates the coding pattern imposed on the outgoing beams. If the squared SNR ratio exceeds a threshold, this is taken as evidence that the beam is returning to the detector. The thresholds for SNR are chosen dependent on background fluxes. They represent a compromise between getting false hits (induced by strong variations in background electron fluxes) and missing true beam hits. The basic software loop that controls EDI operations is executed every 2 ms. As the times when the beams hit their detectors are neither synchronized with the telemetry nor equidistant, EDI data have no fixed time-resolution. Data are reported in telemetry slots. In Survey, using the standard packing mode 0, there are eight telemetry slots per second and Gyn Detector Unit (GDU). The last beam detected during the previous slot will be reported in the current slot. If no beam has been detected, the data quality will be set to zero. In Burst telemetry there are 128 slots per second and GDU. The data in each slot consists of information regarding the beam firing directions (stored in the form of analytic gun deflection voltages), times-of-flight (if successfully measured), quality indicators, time stamps of the beam hits, and some auxiliary correlator-related information. Whenever EDI is not in electron drift mode, it uses its ambient electron mode. The mode has the capability to sample at either 90 degrees pitch angle or at 0/180 degrees (field aligned), or to alternate between 90 degrees and field aligned with selectable dwell times. While all options have been demonstrated during the commissioning phase, only the field aligned mode has been used in the routine operations phase. The choices for energy are 250 eV, 500 eV, and 1 keV. The two detectors, which are facing opposite hemispheres, are looking strictly into opposite directions, so while one detector is looking along B the other is looking antiparallel to B (corresponding to pitch angles of 180 and 0 degrees, respectively). The two detectors switch roles every half spin of the spacecraft as the tip of the magnetic field vector spins outside the field of view of one detector and into the field of view of the other detector. This is the primary data product generated from data collected in electric field mode. The science data generated are drift velocity and electric field data in various coordinate systems. They are derived from triangulation and/or time-of-flight analysis. Where both methods are applicable, their results will be combined using a weighting approach based on their relative errors. The EDI instrument paper can be found at: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs11214-015-0182-7. The EDI instrument data products guide can be found at https://lasp.colorado.edu/mms/sdc/public/datasets/fields/.

41) MMS 4 Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Ambient Electron Flux, Projection Method 1 (PM1), Level 2, Quick-Look Survey maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VSPO/NumericalData/MMS/4/FIELDS/EDI/Survey/Level2/ElectronFluxAmbient/ProjectionMethod1/PT0.03125S
Start:2015-09-02 00:00:00 Observatory:MMS-4 Cadence:0.03125 seconds
Stop:2016-09-14 07:59:59 Instrument:MMS 4 FIELDS Suite, Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Resource:NumericalData
Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Ambient Survey, Level 2, 0.03125 s Data. (32 samples/s)EDI has two scientific data acquisition modes, called electric field mode and ambient mode. In electric field mode, two coded electron beams are emitted such that they return to the detectors after one or more gyrations in the ambient magnetic and electric field. The firing directions and times-of-flight allow the derivation of the drift velocity and electric field. In ambient mode, the electron beams are not used. The detectors with their large geometric factors and their ability to adjust the field of view quickly allow continuous sampling of ambient electrons at a selected pitch angle and fixed but selectable energy. To find the beam directions that will hit the detector, EDI sweeps each beam in the plane perpendicular to B at a fixed angular rate of 0.22 /ms until a signal has been acquired by the detector. Once signal has been acquired, the beams are swept back and forth to stay on target. Beam detection is not determined from the changes in the count-rates directly, but from the square of the beam counts divided by the background counts from ambient electrons, i.e., from the square of the instantaneous signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). This quantity is computed from data provided by the correlator in the Gun-Detector Electronics that also generates the coding pattern imposed on the outgoing beams. If the squared SNR ratio exceeds a threshold, this is taken as evidence that the beam is returning to the detector. The thresholds for SNR are chosen dependent on background fluxes. They represent a compromise between getting false hits (induced by strong variations in background electron fluxes) and missing true beam hits. The basic software loop that controls EDI operations is executed every 2 ms. As the times when the beams hit their detectors are neither synchronized with the telemetry nor equidistant, EDI data have no fixed time-resolution. Data are reported in telemetry slots. In Survey, using the standard packing mode 0, there are eight telemetry slots per second and Gyn Detector Unit (GDU). The last beam detected during the previous slot will be reported in the current slot. If no beam has been detected, the data quality will be set to zero. In Burst telemetry there are 128 slots per second and GDU. The data in each slot consists of information regarding the beam firing directions (stored in the form of analytic gun deflection voltages), times-of-flight (if successfully measured), quality indicators, time stamps of the beam hits, and some auxiliary correlator-related information. Whenever EDI is not in electron drift mode, it uses its ambient electron mode. The mode has the capability to sample at either 90 degrees pitch angle or at 0/180 degrees (field aligned), or to alternate between 90 degrees and field aligned with selectable dwell times. While all options have been demonstrated during the commissioning phase, only the field aligned mode has been used in the routine operations phase. The choices for energy are 250 eV, 500 eV, and 1 keV. The two detectors, which are facing opposite hemispheres, are looking strictly into opposite directions, so while one detector is looking along B the other is looking antiparallel to B (corresponding to pitch angles of 180 and 0 degrees, respectively). The two detectors switch roles every half spin of the spacecraft as the tip of the magnetic field vector spins outside the field of view of one detector and into the field of view of the other detector. Up until January 4, 2016 the anodes were chosen such that the magnetic field vector projected into the plane of the micro-channel plate entry surface was best aligned with the center of the four anodes ( that is, with the gap between the inner two of the four anodes). Data taken in this configuration are using the term "amb" in the data product names. In the burst data where four channels (corresponding to the four adjacent sensor anode pads) are sampled per GDU, the average (or sum) of the center two channels (channels 2 and 3) represents best the pitch angle of 0 degrees (or 180 degrees). The EDI instrument paper can be found at: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs11214-015-0182-7. The EDI instrument data products guide can be found at https://lasp.colorado.edu/mms/sdc/public/datasets/fields/.

42) MMS 4 Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Ambient Electron Flux, Projection Method 2 (PM2), Level 2, Quick-Look Survey maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VSPO/NumericalData/MMS/4/FIELDS/EDI/Survey/Level2/ElectronFluxAmbient/ProjectionMethod2/PT0.03125S
Start:2016-01-05 00:00:00 Observatory:MMS-4 Cadence:0.03125 seconds
Stop:2016-09-14 07:59:59 Instrument:MMS 4 FIELDS Suite, Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Resource:NumericalData
Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Ambient Survey, Level 2, 0.03125 s Data (32 samples/s). EDI has two scientific data acquisition modes, called electric field mode and ambient mode. In electric field mode, two coded electron beams are emitted such that they return to the detectors after one or more gyrations in the ambient magnetic and electric field. The firing directions and times-of-flight allow the derivation of the drift velocity and electric field. In ambient mode, the electron beams are not used. The detectors with their large geometric factors and their ability to adjust the field of view quickly allow continuous sampling of ambient electrons at a selected pitch angle and fixed but selectable energy. To find the beam directions that will hit the detector, EDI sweeps each beam in the plane perpendicular to B at a fixed angular rate of 0.22 /ms until a signal has been acquired by the detector. Once signal has been acquired, the beams are swept back and forth to stay on target. Beam detection is not determined from the changes in the count-rates directly, but from the square of the beam counts divided by the background counts from ambient electrons, i.e., from the square of the instantaneous signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). This quantity is computed from data provided by the correlator in the Gun-Detector Electronics that also generates the coding pattern imposed on the outgoing beams. If the squared SNR ratio exceeds a threshold, this is taken as evidence that the beam is returning to the detector. The thresholds for SNR are chosen dependent on background fluxes. They represent a compromise between getting false hits (induced by strong variations in background electron fluxes) and missing true beam hits. The basic software loop that controls EDI operations is executed every 2 ms. As the times when the beams hit their detectors are neither synchronized with the telemetry nor equidistant, EDI data have no fixed time-resolution. Data are reported in telemetry slots. In Survey, using the standard packing mode 0, there are eight telemetry slots per second and Gyn Detector Unit (GDU). The last beam detected during the previous slot will be reported in the current slot. If no beam has been detected, the data quality will be set to zero. In Burst telemetry there are 128 slots per second and GDU. The data in each slot consists of information regarding the beam firing directions (stored in the form of analytic gun deflection voltages), times-of-flight (if successfully measured), quality indicators, time stamps of the beam hits, and some auxiliary correlator-related information. Whenever EDI is not in electron drift mode, it uses its ambient electron mode. The mode has the capability to sample at either 90 degrees pitch angle or at 0/180 degrees (field aligned), or to alternate between 90 degrees and field aligned with selectable dwell times. While all options have been demonstrated during the commissioning phase, only the field aligned mode has been used in the routine operations phase. The choices for energy are 250 eV, 500 eV, and 1 keV. The two detectors, which are facing opposite hemispheres, are looking strictly into opposite directions, so while one detector is looking along B the other is looking antiparallel to B (corresponding to pitch angles of 180 and 0 degrees, respectively). The two detectors switch roles every half spin of the spacecraft as the tip of the magnetic field vector spins outside the field of view of one detector and into the field of view of the other detector. Starting January 4, 2016, the anodes were chosen such that the projection of the magnetic field vector was best aligned with the center of the first (that is, outer) of the four anodes. This provides coverage of a larger range of pitch angles in general. Data taken in this configuration are identified by the term "amb-pm2" in the data product names. In the burst data where four channels (corresponding to the four adjacent sensor anode pads) are sampled per GDU, channel 1 represents best the pitch angle of 0 degrees (or 180 degrees). The EDI instrument paper can be found at: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs11214-015-0182-7. The EDI instrument data products guide can be found at https://lasp.colorado.edu/mms/sdc/public/datasets/fields/.

43) MMS 4 Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Quality Zero Counts, Level 2, Quick-Look Survey maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VSPO/NumericalData/MMS/4/FIELDS/EDI/Survey/Level2/QualityZero/PT0.125S
Start:2015-04-22 00:00:00 Observatory:MMS-4 Cadence:0.125 seconds
Stop:2016-09-14 07:59:59 Instrument:MMS 4 FIELDS Suite, Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Resource:NumericalData
Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Q0 Survey, Level 2, 0.125 s Data (8 samples/s). EDI has two scientific data acquisition modes, called electric field mode and ambient mode. In electric field mode, two coded electron beams are emitted such that they return to the detectors after one or more gyrations in the ambient magnetic and electric field. The firing directions and times-of-flight allow the derivation of the drift velocity and electric field. In ambient mode, the electron beams are not used. The detectors with their large geometric factors and their ability to adjust the field of view quickly allow continuous sampling of ambient electrons at a selected pitch angle and fixed but selectable energy. To find the beam directions that will hit the detector, EDI sweeps each beam in the plane perpendicular to B at a fixed angular rate of 0.22 /ms until a signal has been acquired by the detector. Once signal has been acquired, the beams are swept back and forth to stay on target. Beam detection is not determined from the changes in the count-rates directly, but from the square of the beam counts divided by the background counts from ambient electrons, i.e., from the square of the instantaneous signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). This quantity is computed from data provided by the correlator in the Gun-Detector Electronics that also generates the coding pattern imposed on the outgoing beams. If the squared SNR ratio exceeds a threshold, this is taken as evidence that the beam is returning to the detector. The thresholds for SNR are chosen dependent on background fluxes. They represent a compromise between getting false hits (induced by strong variations in background electron fluxes) and missing true beam hits. The basic software loop that controls EDI operations is executed every 2 ms. As the times when the beams hit their detectors are neither synchronized with the telemetry nor equidistant, EDI data have no fixed time-resolution. Data are reported in telemetry slots. In Survey, using the standard packing mode 0, there are eight telemetry slots per second and Gyn Detector Unit (GDU). The last beam detected during the previous slot will be reported in the current slot. If no beam has been detected, the data quality will be set to zero. In Burst telemetry there are 128 slots per second and GDU. The data in each slot consists of information regarding the beam firing directions (stored in the form of analytic gun deflection voltages), times-of-flight (if successfully measured), quality indicators, time stamps of the beam hits, and some auxiliary correlator-related information. Whenever EDI is not in electron drift mode, it uses its ambient electron mode. The mode has the capability to sample at either 90 degrees pitch angle or at 0/180 degrees (field aligned), or to alternate between 90 degrees and field aligned with selectable dwell times. While all options have been demonstrated during the commissioning phase, only the field aligned mode has been used in the routine operations phase. The choices for energy are 250 eV, 500 eV, and 1 keV. The two detectors, which are facing opposite hemispheres, are looking strictly into opposite directions, so while one detector is looking along B the other is looking antiparallel to B (corresponding to pitch angles of 180 and 0 degrees, respectively). The two detectors switch roles every half spin of the spacecraft as the tip of the magnetic field vector spins outside the field of view of one detector and into the field of view of the other detector. These data are a by-product generated from data collected in electric field mode. Whenever no return beam is found in a particular time slot by the flight software to be reported will be flagged with the lowest quality level (quality zero). The ground processing generates a separate data product from these counts data. The EDI instrument paper can be found at: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs11214-015-0182-7. The EDI instrument data products guide can be found at https://lasp.colorado.edu/mms/sdc/public/datasets/fields/.

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