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1) Akebono PWS NPW Data maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VWO/NumericalData/Akebono/PWS/E.NPW.PT2S
Start:1989-02-24 13:32:00 Observatory:Akebono Cadence:2 seconds
Stop:2014-10-20 01:03:37 Instrument:Plasma Wave Observation and Sounder Experiments (PWS) Resource:NumericalData
The Plasma Wave Observation and Sounder Experiment (PWS) observes both natural (NPW) and stimulated (SPW) plasma waves. The frequency range of the NPW system is 20 kHz to 5.12 MHz. These CDF data consist of Electric Field intensities measured by the PWS Recevier 1 (RX1) and Receiver 2 (RX2) units.

2) Cluster II Rumba Prime Parameter Electric Field and Waves (EFW) Data maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VMO/NumericalData/Cluster-Rumba/EFW/PrimeParameter/4S
Start:2000-12-09 00:00:00 Observatory:Cluster FM5 (Rumba) Cadence:4 seconds
Stop:2014-10-20 01:03:25 Instrument:Electric Field and Waves (EFW) Resource:NumericalData
The EFW (Electric Field and Waves) instrument consists of four orthogonal spherical sensors deployed from 50 m cable booms in the spin plane of the spacecraft, plus four deployment units and a main electronics unit. Each deployment unit deploys a multiconductor cable and tip-mounted spherical sensor. Each opposing pair of cables will be symmetrically deployed to a tip-to-tip distance of approximately 100 m, except for about a week at the beginning of the mission when 70 m will be used for one boom pair (the Z-booms) and 100 m for the other pair. The potentials of the spherical sensor and nearby conductors are controlled by the microprocessor to minimize errors associated with photoelectron fluxes to and from the spheres. Output signals from the sensor preamplifiers are provided to the wave instruments for analysis of high frequency wave phenomena. There is a 1 MB burst memory and tow fast A/D conversion circuits for recording electric field wave forms for time resolutions of up to 36,000 samples/s. Data gathered in the burst memory will be played back through the telemetry stream allocated to the instrument by pre-empting a portion of the real-time data. Incoming data are continuously monitored by algorithms in the software to determine whether to trigger the burst-playback mode. A large number of sampling modes is possible, yielding four possible telemetry rates from 1.440-29.440 Kbps. This data stream is transferred via the DWP instrument. The main measured quantities will be, in various modes: (1) the instantaneous spin-plane components of the electric field vector, from 0.1-700 V/Km, with time resolution down to 0.1 ms, in four frequency ranges from DC to upper limits of 10 Hz, 180 Hz, 4 KHz, or 32 KHz; (2) the AC electric field components from 10 Hz to 8 KHz, within the dynamic range of ~3 mV/Km to 10 V/Km; (3) plasma density fluctuations within the range of 1-100/cm and in three frequency ranges from 0 Hz to upper limits of 10 Hz, 180 Hz, or 4 KHz; and, (4) density and temperature (in Langmuir sweeps) in the eV range, with a dynamic range of 1-100/cm. There is also a frequency counter covering the range 10-200 KHz. On-board calculations of least-square fits to the electric field data over one spacecraft spin period (4 s) will provide a baseline of high-quality two-dimensional electric field components that are present in the telemetry stream, except for periods when three or four sensors are in current mode. The spacecraft potential is calculated and transmitted via DWP to other instruments on board. The three components from the search coil instrument (WHISPER) are also available in EFW with a bandwidth of 4 KHz. For more details of the Cluster mission, the spacecraft, and its instruments, see the report Cluster: mission, payload and supporting activities, March 1993, ESA SP-1159, and the included article The Spherical Probe Electric Field and Waves experiment for the Cluster Mission, by G. Gustafsson et al., from which this information was obtained.

3) Cluster II Salsa Prime Parameter Electric Field and Waves (EFW) Data maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VMO/NumericalData/Cluster-Salsa/EFW/PrimeParameter/4S
Start:2000-12-09 00:00:00 Observatory:Cluster FM6 (Salsa) Cadence:4 seconds
Stop:2014-10-20 01:02:29 Instrument:Electric Field and Waves (EFW) Resource:NumericalData
The EFW (Electric Field and Waves) instrument consists of four orthogonal spherical sensors deployed from 50 m cable booms in the spin plane of the spacecraft, plus four deployment units and a main electronics unit. Each deployment unit deploys a multiconductor cable and tip-mounted spherical sensor. Each opposing pair of cables will be symmetrically deployed to a tip-to-tip distance of approximately 100 m, except for about a week at the beginning of the mission when 70 m will be used for one boom pair (the Z-booms) and 100 m for the other pair. The potentials of the spherical sensor and nearby conductors are controlled by the microprocessor to minimize errors associated with photoelectron fluxes to and from the spheres. Output signals from the sensor preamplifiers are provided to the wave instruments for analysis of high frequency wave phenomena. There is a 1 MB burst memory and tow fast A/D conversion circuits for recording electric field wave forms for time resolutions of up to 36,000 samples/s. Data gathered in the burst memory will be played back through the telemetry stream allocated to the instrument by pre-empting a portion of the real-time data. Incoming data are continuously monitored by algorithms in the software to determine whether to trigger the burst-playback mode. A large number of sampling modes is possible, yielding four possible telemetry rates from 1.440-29.440 Kbps. This data stream is transferred via the DWP instrument. The main measured quantities will be, in various modes: (1) the instantaneous spin-plane components of the electric field vector, from 0.1-700 V/Km, with time resolution down to 0.1 ms, in four frequency ranges from DC to upper limits of 10 Hz, 180 Hz, 4 KHz, or 32 KHz; (2) the AC electric field components from 10 Hz to 8 KHz, within the dynamic range of ~3 mV/Km to 10 V/Km; (3) plasma density fluctuations within the range of 1-100/cm and in three frequency ranges from 0 Hz to upper limits of 10 Hz, 180 Hz, or 4 KHz; and, (4) density and temperature (in Langmuir sweeps) in the eV range, with a dynamic range of 1-100/cm. There is also a frequency counter covering the range 10-200 KHz. On-board calculations of least-square fits to the electric field data over one spacecraft spin period (4 s) will provide a baseline of high-quality two-dimensional electric field components that are present in the telemetry stream, except for periods when three or four sensors are in current mode. The spacecraft potential is calculated and transmitted via DWP to other instruments on board. The three components from the search coil instrument (WHISPER) are also available in EFW with a bandwidth of 4 KHz. For more details of the Cluster mission, the spacecraft, and its instruments, see the report Cluster: mission, payload and supporting activities, March 1993, ESA SP-1159, and the included article The Spherical Probe Electric Field and Waves experiment for the Cluster Mission, by G. Gustafsson et al., from which this information was obtained.

4) Cluster II Samba Prime Parameter Electric Field and Waves (EFW) Data maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VMO/NumericalData/Cluster-Samba/EFW/PrimeParameter/4S
Start:2000-12-09 00:00:00 Observatory:Cluster FM7 (Samba) Cadence:4 seconds
Stop:2014-10-20 01:03:02 Instrument:Electric Field and Waves (EFW) Resource:NumericalData
The EFW (Electric Field and Waves) instrument consists of four orthogonal spherical sensors deployed from 50 m cable booms in the spin plane of the spacecraft, plus four deployment units and a main electronics unit. Each deployment unit deploys a multiconductor cable and tip-mounted spherical sensor. Each opposing pair of cables will be symmetrically deployed to a tip-to-tip distance of approximately 100 m, except for about a week at the beginning of the mission when 70 m will be used for one boom pair (the Z-booms) and 100 m for the other pair. The potentials of the spherical sensor and nearby conductors are controlled by the microprocessor to minimize errors associated with photoelectron fluxes to and from the spheres. Output signals from the sensor preamplifiers are provided to the wave instruments for analysis of high frequency wave phenomena. There is a 1 MB burst memory and tow fast A/D conversion circuits for recording electric field wave forms for time resolutions of up to 36,000 samples/s. Data gathered in the burst memory will be played back through the telemetry stream allocated to the instrument by pre-empting a portion of the real-time data. Incoming data are continuously monitored by algorithms in the software to determine whether to trigger the burst-playback mode. A large number of sampling modes is possible, yielding four possible telemetry rates from 1.440-29.440 Kbps. This data stream is transferred via the DWP instrument. The main measured quantities will be, in various modes: (1) the instantaneous spin-plane components of the electric field vector, from 0.1-700 V/Km, with time resolution down to 0.1 ms, in four frequency ranges from DC to upper limits of 10 Hz, 180 Hz, 4 KHz, or 32 KHz; (2) the AC electric field components from 10 Hz to 8 KHz, within the dynamic range of ~3 mV/Km to 10 V/Km; (3) plasma density fluctuations within the range of 1-100/cm and in three frequency ranges from 0 Hz to upper limits of 10 Hz, 180 Hz, or 4 KHz; and, (4) density and temperature (in Langmuir sweeps) in the eV range, with a dynamic range of 1-100/cm. There is also a frequency counter covering the range 10-200 KHz. On-board calculations of least-square fits to the electric field data over one spacecraft spin period (4 s) will provide a baseline of high-quality two-dimensional electric field components that are present in the telemetry stream, except for periods when three or four sensors are in current mode. The spacecraft potential is calculated and transmitted via DWP to other instruments on board. The three components from the search coil instrument (WHISPER) are also available in EFW with a bandwidth of 4 KHz. For more details of the Cluster mission, the spacecraft, and its instruments, see the report Cluster: mission, payload and supporting activities, March 1993, ESA SP-1159, and the included article The Spherical Probe Electric Field and Waves experiment for the Cluster Mission, by G. Gustafsson et al., from which this information was obtained.

5) Cluster II Tango Prime Parameter Electric Field and Waves (EFW) Data maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VMO/NumericalData/Cluster-Tango/EFW/PrimeParameter/4S
Start:2000-12-09 00:00:00 Observatory:Cluster FM8 (Tango) Cadence:4 seconds
Stop:2014-10-20 01:02:51 Instrument:Electric Field and Waves (EFW) Resource:NumericalData
The EFW (Electric Field and Waves) instrument consists of four orthogonal spherical sensors deployed from 50 m cable booms in the spin plane of the spacecraft, plus four deployment units and a main electronics unit. Each deployment unit deploys a multiconductor cable and tip-mounted spherical sensor. Each opposing pair of cables will be symmetrically deployed to a tip-to-tip distance of approximately 100 m, except for about a week at the beginning of the mission when 70 m will be used for one boom pair (the Z-booms) and 100 m for the other pair. The potentials of the spherical sensor and nearby conductors are controlled by the microprocessor to minimize errors associated with photoelectron fluxes to and from the spheres. Output signals from the sensor preamplifiers are provided to the wave instruments for analysis of high frequency wave phenomena. There is a 1 MB burst memory and tow fast A/D conversion circuits for recording electric field wave forms for time resolutions of up to 36,000 samples/s. Data gathered in the burst memory will be played back through the telemetry stream allocated to the instrument by pre-empting a portion of the real-time data. Incoming data are continuously monitored by algorithms in the software to determine whether to trigger the burst-playback mode. A large number of sampling modes is possible, yielding four possible telemetry rates from 1.440-29.440 Kbps. This data stream is transferred via the DWP instrument. The main measured quantities will be, in various modes: (1) the instantaneous spin-plane components of the electric field vector, from 0.1-700 V/Km, with time resolution down to 0.1 ms, in four frequency ranges from DC to upper limits of 10 Hz, 180 Hz, 4 KHz, or 32 KHz; (2) the AC electric field components from 10 Hz to 8 KHz, within the dynamic range of ~3 mV/Km to 10 V/Km; (3) plasma density fluctuations within the range of 1-100/cm and in three frequency ranges from 0 Hz to upper limits of 10 Hz, 180 Hz, or 4 KHz; and, (4) density and temperature (in Langmuir sweeps) in the eV range, with a dynamic range of 1-100/cm. There is also a frequency counter covering the range 10-200 KHz. On-board calculations of least-square fits to the electric field data over one spacecraft spin period (4 s) will provide a baseline of high-quality two-dimensional electric field components that are present in the telemetry stream, except for periods when three or four sensors are in current mode. The spacecraft potential is calculated and transmitted via DWP to other instruments on board. The three components from the search coil instrument (WHISPER) are also available in EFW with a bandwidth of 4 KHz. For more details of the Cluster mission, the spacecraft, and its instruments, see the report Cluster: mission, payload and supporting activities, March 1993, ESA SP-1159, and the included article The Spherical Probe Electric Field and Waves experiment for the Cluster Mission, by G. Gustafsson et al., from which this information was obtained.

6) Cluster II Summary Parameter Electric Field and Waves (EFW) Data maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VMO/NumericalData/Cluster/EFW/SummaryParameter/60S
Start:2001-01-01 00:00:00 Observatory:Cluster FM5 (Rumba) Cadence:60 seconds
Stop:2014-10-20 01:02:28 Instrument:Electric Field and Waves (EFW) Resource:NumericalData
The EFW (Electric Field and Waves) instrument consists of four orthogonal spherical sensors deployed from 50 m cable booms in the spin plane of the spacecraft, plus four deployment units and a main electronics unit. Each deployment unit deploys a multiconductor cable and tip-mounted spherical sensor. Each opposing pair of cables will be symmetrically deployed to a tip-to-tip distance of approximately 100 m, except for about a week at the beginning of the mission when 70 m will be used for one boom pair (the Z-booms) and 100 m for the other pair. The potentials of the spherical sensor and nearby conductors are controlled by the microprocessor to minimize errors associated with photoelectron fluxes to and from the spheres. Output signals from the sensor preamplifiers are provided to the wave instruments for analysis of high frequency wave phenomena. There is a 1 MB burst memory and tow fast A/D conversion circuits for recording electric field wave forms for time resolutions of up to 36,000 samples/s. Data gathered in the burst memory will be played back through the telemetry stream allocated to the instrument by pre-empting a portion of the real-time data. Incoming data are continuously monitored by algorithms in the software to determine whether to trigger the burst-playback mode. A large number of sampling modes is possible, yielding four possible telemetry rates from 1.440-29.440 Kbps. This data stream is transferred via the DWP instrument. The main measured quantities will be, in various modes: (1) the instantaneous spin-plane components of the electric field vector, from 0.1-700 V/Km, with time resolution down to 0.1 ms, in four frequency ranges from DC to upper limits of 10 Hz, 180 Hz, 4 KHz, or 32 KHz; (2) the AC electric field components from 10 Hz to 8 KHz, within the dynamic range of ~3 mV/Km to 10 V/Km; (3) plasma density fluctuations within the range of 1-100/cm and in three frequency ranges from 0 Hz to upper limits of 10 Hz, 180 Hz, or 4 KHz; and, (4) density and temperature (in Langmuir sweeps) in the eV range, with a dynamic range of 1-100/cm. There is also a frequency counter covering the range 10-200 KHz. On-board calculations of least-square fits to the electric field data over one spacecraft spin period (4 s) will provide a baseline of high-quality two-dimensional electric field components that are present in the telemetry stream, except for periods when three or four sensors are in current mode. The spacecraft potential is calculated and transmitted via DWP to other instruments on board. The three components from the search coil instrument (WHISPER) are also available in EFW with a bandwidth of 4 KHz. For more details of the Cluster mission, the spacecraft, and its instruments, see the report Cluster: mission, payload and supporting activities, March 1993, ESA SP-1159, and the included article The Spherical Probe Electric Field and Waves experiment for the Cluster Mission, by G. Gustafsson et al., from which this information was obtained.

7) Hawkeye Multi-Instrument Summary Plots maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VWO/DisplayData/Hawkeye/VLF/Multi.Instrument.PT51H
Start:1974-06-06 03:00:00 Observatory:Hawkeye Cadence:
Stop:1978-04-28 17:00:00 Instrument:Hawkeye VLF Resource:DisplayData
To help the user in searching through the Hawkeye data set, summary plots of the entire Hawkeye archive have been generated. Each summary plot consists of an entire orbit's worth of data from all of the instruments, along with the spacecraft position. Solar wind plasma pressure and IMF data have been added to the plots to help the user in data selection. HAWKEYE SUMMARY PLOT LAYOUT Title The orbit number is the orbit number at start of the plot time interval. Day 1 = January 1. First (top) panel Solar Wind pressure (red curve and red dots). Solar Wind IMF Bz component (in GSM) (blue dots). IMP-8 spacecraft Bz (in GSM) component (black curve). Second Panel The two numbers above the second panel are the positions of IMP-8 in degrees ( sign(y_gsm) * atan(sqrt(y_gsm^2+z_gsm^2)/x_gsm) ), at the start of and at the end of the plot time interval. Usually, if IMP-8 lies between -110 and +110 degrees it is in the solar wind. Solar Wind IMF magnetic field magnitude |B| (blue dots). IMP-8 magnetic Field magnitude |B| (black curve). Hawkeye magnetic Field magnitude |B| (red curve). Third Panel The two numbers above the third panel are: (left corner) The angle between the sun vector and spacecraft spin plane. Because the Hawkeye particle instrument's (LEPEDEA) field view is +/- 15 degrees out the the spin plane, this angle has to be less than 15 degrees in order to detect the solar wind when the spacecraft is located in the solar wind. (right corner)The spin period of the spacecraft in seconds. The electron energy-time spectrogram averaged over the solid angle sampled by LEPEDEA is plotted. Fourth Panel The ion energy-time spectrogram averaged over the solid angle sampled by LEPEDEA Fifth Panel The frequency-time spectrogram of the magnetic field as measured by the loop antenna The electron cyclotron frequency (white curve) as determined by the on-board magnetometer Sixth (bottom) Panel The electric field frequency-time spectrogram as measured by the dipole antenna The electron cyclotron frequency (white curve) as determined by the on-board magnetometer Time Axis Labels The universal time (hr:mm). The spacecraft position in Earth radii (RE) in units of RE. The spacecraft position in magnetic latitude (MLAT) in units of degrees. The spacecraft position in magnetic local time (MLT) in units of degrees. The spacecraft position in X-GSM in units of RE.

8) Hawkeye Electric and Magnetic Field Radio Frequency Spectrum Analyzer High Time Resolution maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VWO/NumericalData/Hawkeye/VLF/PT22S
Start:1974-06-08 06:45:10 Observatory:Hawkeye Cadence:22 seconds
Stop:1978-04-26 15:59:05 Instrument:Hawkeye VLF Resource:NumericalData
The CDF file contains approximately 22 second time resolution Electric and Magnetic field data, average magnetic field magnitude, and orbital position data from Hawkeye 1. The VLF experiment measured electric and magnetic fields using a 42.45-m electric dipole (tip-to-tip) which extended perpendicular to the spin axis and a search coil antenna deployed 1.58 m from the spacecraft. The electric field spectrum measurements were made in 16 logarithmically spaced frequency channels extending from 1.78 Hz to 178 kHz, and dc electric fields were also measured. The bandwidth of these channels varied from 7.5% to 30% depending on center frequency. Channel sensitivity and dynamic range were 1E-6 V/m and 100 dB, respectively. A wideband receiver was also used, with two selectable bandwidth ranges: 0.15 to 10 kHz or 1 to 45 kHz. The magnetic field spectrum was measured in eight discrete, logarithmically spaced channels from 1.78 Hz to 5.62 kHz. The bandwidth of these channels varied from 7.5% to 30% depending on frequency. The dynamic range was 100 dB, and the sensitivity ranged from 0.1 nT at 1.78 Hz to 3.4E-4 nT at 5.62 kHz. The wideband receiver described above could be used with the magnetic antenna. Each discrete channel was sampled once every 11.52 s.

9) IMAGE RPI Daily Dynamic Spectrogram Plot maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VWO/DisplayData/IMAGE/RPI/DS.P1D
Start:2000-04-21 20:24:42 Observatory:IMAGE Cadence:5 minutes
Stop:2005-12-18 07:50:00 Instrument:Radio Plasma Imager (RPI) Resource:DisplayData
Collection of RPI Daily Dynamic Spectrogram plots at NASA GSFC, covering complete mission period from 2000-04-21 to 2005-12-18. Dynamic Spectrograms present the time history of natural radio emissions in space between 3 and 1009 kHz while the IMAGE spacecraft orbits the Earth. This operating frequency range was selected by the RPI team to provide an optimal temporal resolution to the wave observations. Each image is a daily plot of the voltage spectral density of received signal (color scale) as function of operating frequency (vertical axis) and time (horizontal axis). Commonly used in the analysis of noise generators, spectral density is a frequency-dependent characteristic that describes how much power is generated by the emission source in a 1 Hz bandwidth. RPI Dynamic Spectograms plot a Voltage Spectral Density, which is root of power spectral density, measured in [V/root-Hz] units. Note that conversion of antenna voltage to electric field strength depends on effective length of receive antennas, and such conversion is not performed here. RPI is capable of detecting input radio emissions above its noise floor of 5 nV/root-Hz, which is determined by the internal white noise of the RPI antenna pre-amplifiers.

10) RPI Dynamic Spectrogram data in CDF at NASA CDAWeb maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VWO/NumericalData/IMAGE/RPI/DS.PT5M
Start:2000-04-21 20:24:42 Observatory:IMAGE Cadence:5 minutes
Stop:2005-12-18 07:50:00 Instrument:Radio Plasma Imager (RPI) Resource:NumericalData
RPI passive wave measurement capturing voltage spectral density of the radio emissions in space as a function of frequency, typically between 3 and 1009 kHz. This operating frequency range was selected by the RPI team to provide optimal temporal resolution of the wave observations. Commonly used in the analysis of noise generators, spectral density is a frequency-dependent characteristic that describes how much power is generated by the emission source in a 1 Hz bandwidth. The original description of emissions was done in terms of thermal noise measurements, though the same approach also applies to non-thermal emissions such as AKR. CDF_DS_PT5M stores calibrated data from all three RPI antennas X, Y, and Z individually and a combined X+Y antenna channel. The data are presented as the Voltage Spectral Density (VSD), which is the root of power spectral density, measured in [V/root-Hz] units. Note that conversion of antenna voltage to electric field strength depends on the effective length of the receive antenna, and such conversion is not performed here. (See spase://SMWG/Instrument/IMAGE/RPI for a time history of the lengths of the three mutually orthogonal RPI dipole antennas.) RPI is capable of detecting input radio emissions above its noise floor of 5 nV/root-Hz, which is determined by the internal white noise of the RPI antenna pre-amplifiers. The VSD in RPI spectrogram data is presented in dB relative to 1 V/root-Hz (logarithmic scale), units of dB(V/root-Hz). The RPI instrument noise floor is 5 nV/root-Hz = -166 dB(V/root-Hz) at the receiver input. Software suggested by the science team for CDF file visualization: (1) Plotting tool at the CDAWeb portal, (2) For analysis beyond static image inspection, including color scale optimization, zooming, text export, alternative data representations in physical units, detailed frequency and time information, overlaid model fpe and fce graphs, and EPS quality figures, use BinBrowser software at UML, http://ulcar.uml.edu/rpi.html

11) RPI Plasmagram Full Resolution Binary Data maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VWO/NumericalData/IMAGE/RPI/PGM.CCSDS.PT5M
Start:2000-04-21 20:24:42 Observatory:IMAGE Cadence:5 minutes
Stop:2005-12-11 02:43:10 Instrument:Radio Plasma Imager (RPI) Resource:NumericalData
RPI plasmagram full resolution data (received signal strength in the frequency-range frame), uncalibrated. Presented as instrument packets wrapped in the standard CCSDS headers. Description of the RPI instrument-level data model can be found at http://ulcar.uml.edu/RPI/RPITelemetryDataFormat_V2.8.pdf. Data are viewed/calibrated/edited by BinBrowser software, see http://ulcar.uml.edu/rpi.html for download and users' guide. RPI plasmagrams are visualized by plotting images in which received signal strength (color scale) is a function of echo delay (range in vertical scale) and radio-sounder frequency (horizontal scale) of the radar pulses. Echoes from important magnetospheric structures, such as the magnetopause and the plasmapause, appear as traces on plasmagrams. Plasmagram traces are intermixed with vertical signatures corresponding to the locally excited plasma resonances and various natural emissions propagating in space.

12) RPI Plasmagram data in CDF at NASA CDAWeb maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VWO/NumericalData/IMAGE/RPI/PGM.CDF.PT5M
Start:2000-03-26 07:51:50 Observatory:IMAGE Cadence:5 minutes
Stop:2005-12-18 07:40:47 Instrument:Radio Plasma Imager (RPI) Resource:NumericalData
Software suggested by the science team for CDF file visualization: (1) Plotting tool at the CDAWeb portal, (2) For analysis beyond static image inspection, including color scale optimization, zooming, text export, alternative data representations in physical units, detailed frequency and time information, overlaid model fpe and fce graphs, and EPS quality figures, use BinBrowser software at UML, http://ulcar.uml.edu/rpi.html

13) IMAGE RPI Plasmagram Plots maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VWO/DisplayData/IMAGE/RPI/PGM.PT5M
Start:2000-04-21 20:24:42 Observatory:IMAGE Cadence:5 minutes
Stop:2005-12-18 07:50:00 Instrument:Radio Plasma Imager (RPI) Resource:DisplayData
Collection of RPI Plasmagram images at University of Massachusetts Lowell, covering complete mission period from 2000-04-21 to 2005-12-18. Access to images is arranged via a webpage containing a query form with the time period of interest and options for search of expert-annotated plasmagrams. The query returns a list of qualifying plasmagrams with URLs pointing to images. RPI plasmagrams are visualized by plotting images in which received signal strength (color scale) is a function of echo delay (range in vertical scale) and radio-sounder frequency (horizontal scale) of the sounder pulses. Echoes that can be used to derive remote, long-range, magnetospheric electron-density profiles, appear as discrete traces on plasmagrams. These plasmagram traces are intermixed with vertical signatures with greater intensity at shorter ranges, corresponding to locally excited plasma resonances, and other vertical signatures that cover the entire listening period, i.e., the entire virtual-range scale, corresponding to various natural and/or man-made emissions propagating in space and/or local interference.

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