Search results 15 matches in 0.005 seconds
Showing 1 - 15

1) Cluster Rumba Active Spacecraft POtential Control (ASPOC) Data at the ESA Cluster Science Archive maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VSPO/NumericalData/Cluster-Rumba/ASPOC/CSA/PT0.033S
Start:2000-12-09 00:00:00 Observatory:Cluster FM5 (Rumba) Cadence:0.033 seconds
Stop:2008-07-01 00:00:00 Instrument:Active Spacecraft Potential Control (ASPOC) Resource:NumericalData
The primary objective of ASPOC (Active Spacecraft POtential Control) onboard Cluster is to insure the effective and complete measurement of the ambient plasma distribution functions down to low energy. Two main ASPOC data products are available from the Cluster Active Archive: ion bean current at 0.5 second resolution and ion current snapshot at 0.033 second resolution. Ancillary data include command history, status of the instrument at 5.15 second resolution, preliminary emitted current parameters (at 4-second resolution and 1-minute aveerges) and caveats. For more details, see "The Cluster Active Archive: Studying the Earth's Space Plasma Environment", edited by Dr. Harri Laakso, Matthew G. T. T. Taylor, C. Philippe Escoubet, from which this information was obtained.

2) Cluster II Rumba Prime Parameter Active Spacecraft Potential Control (ASPOC) Data maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VMO/NumericalData/Cluster-Rumba/ASPOC/PrimeParameter/PT4S
Start:2001-01-30 00:00:00 Observatory:Cluster FM5 (Rumba) Cadence:4 seconds
Stop:2016-09-14 07:58:16 Instrument:Active Spacecraft Potential Control (ASPOC) Resource:NumericalData
The ASPOC instrument is a single unit consisting of an electronics box and two cylindrical ion emitter modules. The emitters produce indium ions at approximately 6 KeV, in a current of less than 50 microamps. This is done by field evaporation of indium in the apex field of a needle. In the basic feedback mode of operation, a measurement of the spacecraft potential is supplied to the instrument from either the electric field experiment (EFW) or the electron analyzer (PEACE). This information is then used to adjust the emission current to reduce the spacecraft potential to some predetermined value. By default, priority is given to the EFW data, because of the higher resolution (0.034 V vs. ~1.4 V) and the more straightforward way in which the potential is derived. A calibration mode will measure the current voltage characteristics of the spacecraft, at the beginning of the mission and occasionally later to account for changes in the photoemission properties of the surface. This measurement is carried out by sweeping the ion emission current in incremental steps over some convenient range, allowing simultaneous measurements of the spacecraft potential. The length of each step is 2 to 4 spin periods. In addition to providing an improved environment for other experiments, ASPOC will permit scientific investigations of the photoelectric characteristics of the dependence of the spacecraft potential on plasma parameters, and of spacecraft charging in different plasma environments to be carried out in the so called active mode. For more details of the Cluster mission, the spacecraft, and its instruments, see the report 'Cluster: mission, payload and supporting activities,' March 1993, ESA SP 1159, and the included article 'Active Spacecraft Potential Control: an ion emitter experiment for Cluster,' by W. Riedler et al., from which this information was obtained.

3) Cluster Salsa Active Spacecraft POtential Control (ASPOC) Data at the ESA Cluster Science Archive maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VSPO/NumericalData/Cluster-Salsa/ASPOC/CSA/PT0.033S
Start:2001-01-01 00:00:00 Observatory:Cluster FM6 (Salsa) Cadence:0.033 seconds
Stop:2008-07-01 00:00:00 Instrument:Active Spacecraft Potential Control (ASPOC) Resource:NumericalData
The primary objective of ASPOC (Active Spacecraft POtential Control) onboard Cluster is to insure the effective and complete measurement of the ambient plasma distribution functions down to low energy. Two main ASPOC data products are available from the Cluster Active Archive: ion bean current at 0.5 second resolution and ion current snapshot at 0.33 second resolution. Ancillary data include command history, status of the instrument at 5.15 second resolution, preliminary emitted current parameters (at 4-second resolution and 1-minute aveerges) and caveats. For more details, see "The Cluster Active Archive: Studying the Earth's Space Plasma Environment", edited by Dr. Harri Laakso, Matthew G. T. T. Taylor, C. Philippe Escoubet, from which this information was obtained.

4) Cluster II Salsa Prime Parameter Active Spacecraft Potential Control (ASPOC) Data maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VMO/NumericalData/Cluster-Salsa/ASPOC/PrimeParameter/PT4S
Start:2001-01-30 00:00:00 Observatory:Cluster FM6 (Salsa) Cadence:4 seconds
Stop:2016-09-14 07:58:21 Instrument:Active Spacecraft Potential Control (ASPOC) Resource:NumericalData
The ASPOC instrument is a single unit consisting of an electronics box and two cylindrical ion emitter modules. The emitters produce indium ions at approximately 6 KeV, in a current of less than 50 microamps. This is done by field evaporation of indium in the apex field of a needle. In the basic feedback mode of operation, a measurement of the spacecraft potential is supplied to the instrument from either the electric field experiment (EFW) or the electron analyzer (PEACE). This information is then used to adjust the emission current to reduce the spacecraft potential to some predetermined value. By default, priority is given to the EFW data, because of the higher resolution (0.034 V vs. ~1.4 V) and the more straightforward way in which the potential is derived. A calibration mode will measure the current voltage characteristics of the spacecraft, at the beginning of the mission and occasionally later to account for changes in the photoemission properties of the surface. This measurement is carried out by sweeping the ion emission current in incremental steps over some convenient range, allowing simultaneous measurements of the spacecraft potential. The length of each step is 2 to 4 spin periods. In addition to providing an improved environment for other experiments, ASPOC will permit scientific investigations of the photoelectric characteristics of the dependence of the spacecraft potential on plasma parameters, and of spacecraft charging in different plasma environments to be carried out in the so called active mode. For more details of the Cluster mission, the spacecraft, and its instruments, see the report 'Cluster: mission, payload and supporting activities,' March 1993, ESA SP 1159, and the included article 'Active Spacecraft Potential Control: an ion emitter experiment for Cluster,' by W. Riedler et al., from which this information was obtained.

5) Cluster Samba Active Spacecraft POtential Control (ASPOC) Data at the ESA Cluster Science Archive maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VSPO/NumericalData/Cluster-Samba/ASPOC/CSA/PT0.033S
Start:2000-12-09 00:00:00 Observatory:Cluster FM7 (Samba) Cadence:0.033 seconds
Stop:2008-07-01 00:00:00 Instrument:Active Spacecraft Potential Control (ASPOC) Resource:NumericalData
The primary objective of ASPOC (Active Spacecraft POtential Control) onboard Cluster is to insure the effective and complete measurement of the ambient plasma distribution functions down to low energy. Two main ASPOC data products are available from the Cluster Active Archive: ion bean current at 0.5 second resolution and ion current snapshot at 0.033 second resolution. Ancillary data include command history, status of the instrument at 5.15 second resolution, preliminary emitted current parameters (at 4-second resolution and 1-minute aveerges) and caveats. For more details, see "The Cluster Active Archive: Studying the Earth's Space Plasma Environment", edited by Dr. Harri Laakso, Matthew G. T. T. Taylor, C. Philippe Escoubet, from which this information was obtained.

6) Cluster II Samba Prime Parameter Active Spacecraft Potential Control (ASPOC) Data maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VMO/NumericalData/Cluster-Samba/ASPOC/PrimeParameter/PT4S
Start:2001-01-30 00:00:00 Observatory:Cluster FM7 (Samba) Cadence:4 seconds
Stop:2016-09-14 07:58:22 Instrument:Active Spacecraft Potential Control (ASPOC) Resource:NumericalData
The ASPOC instrument is a single unit consisting of an electronics box and two cylindrical ion emitter modules. The emitters produce indium ions at approximately 6 KeV, in a current of less than 50 microamps. This is done by field evaporation of indium in the apex field of a needle. In the basic feedback mode of operation, a measurement of the spacecraft potential is supplied to the instrument from either the electric field experiment (EFW) or the electron analyzer (PEACE). This information is then used to adjust the emission current to reduce the spacecraft potential to some predetermined value. By default, priority is given to the EFW data, because of the higher resolution (0.034 V vs. ~1.4 V) and the more straightforward way in which the potential is derived. A calibration mode will measure the current voltage characteristics of the spacecraft, at the beginning of the mission and occasionally later to account for changes in the photoemission properties of the surface. This measurement is carried out by sweeping the ion emission current in incremental steps over some convenient range, allowing simultaneous measurements of the spacecraft potential. The length of each step is 2 to 4 spin periods. In addition to providing an improved environment for other experiments, ASPOC will permit scientific investigations of the photoelectric characteristics of the dependence of the spacecraft potential on plasma parameters, and of spacecraft charging in different plasma environments to be carried out in the so called active mode. For more details of the Cluster mission, the spacecraft, and its instruments, see the report 'Cluster: mission, payload and supporting activities,' March 1993, ESA SP 1159, and the included article 'Active Spacecraft Potential Control: an ion emitter experiment for Cluster,' by W. Riedler et al., from which this information was obtained.

7) Cluster Tango Active Spacecraft POtential Control (ASPOC) Data at the ESA Cluster Science Archive maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VSPO/NumericalData/Cluster-Tango/ASPOC/CSA/PT0.033S
Start:2000-12-09 00:00:00 Observatory:Cluster FM8 (Tango) Cadence:0.033 seconds
Stop:2008-07-01 00:00:00 Instrument:Active Spacecraft Potential Control (ASPOC) Resource:NumericalData
The primary objective of ASPOC (Active Spacecraft POtential Control) onboard Cluster is to insure the effective and complete measurement of the ambient plasma distribution functions down to low energy. Two main ASPOC data products are available from the Cluster Active Archive: ion bean current at 0.5 second resolution and ion current snapshot at 0.033 second resolution. Ancillary data include command history, status of the instrument at 5.15 second resolution, preliminary emitted current parameters (at 4-second resolution and 1-minute aveerges) and caveats. For more details, see "The Cluster Active Archive: Studying the Earth's Space Plasma Environment", edited by Dr. Harri Laakso, Matthew G. T. T. Taylor, C. Philippe Escoubet, from which this information was obtained.

8) Cluster II Tango Prime Parameter Active Spacecraft Potential Control (ASPOC) Data maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VMO/NumericalData/Cluster-Tango/ASPOC/PrimeParameter/PT4S
Start:2001-01-30 00:00:00 Observatory:Cluster FM8 (Tango) Cadence:4 seconds
Stop:2016-09-14 07:58:19 Instrument:Active Spacecraft Potential Control (ASPOC) Resource:NumericalData
The ASPOC instrument is a single unit consisting of an electronics box and two cylindrical ion emitter modules. The emitters produce indium ions at approximately 6 KeV, in a current of less than 50 microamps. This is done by field evaporation of indium in the apex field of a needle. In the basic feedback mode of operation, a measurement of the spacecraft potential is supplied to the instrument from either the electric field experiment (EFW) or the electron analyzer (PEACE). This information is then used to adjust the emission current to reduce the spacecraft potential to some predetermined value. By default, priority is given to the EFW data, because of the higher resolution (0.034 V vs. ~1.4 V) and the more straightforward way in which the potential is derived. A calibration mode will measure the current voltage characteristics of the spacecraft, at the beginning of the mission and occasionally later to account for changes in the photoemission properties of the surface. This measurement is carried out by sweeping the ion emission current in incremental steps over some convenient range, allowing simultaneous measurements of the spacecraft potential. The length of each step is 2 to 4 spin periods. In addition to providing an improved environment for other experiments, ASPOC will permit scientific investigations of the photoelectric characteristics of the dependence of the spacecraft potential on plasma parameters, and of spacecraft charging in different plasma environments to be carried out in the so called active mode. For more details of the Cluster mission, the spacecraft, and its instruments, see the report 'Cluster: mission, payload and supporting activities,' March 1993, ESA SP 1159, and the included article 'Active Spacecraft Potential Control: an ion emitter experiment for Cluster,' by W. Riedler et al., from which this information was obtained.

9) Cluster II Summary Parameter Active Spacecraft Potential Control (ASPOC) Data maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VMO/NumericalData/Cluster/ASPOC/SummaryParameter/PT1M
Start:2001-01-30 00:00:00 Observatory:Cluster FM5 (Rumba) Cadence:1 minute
Stop:2016-09-14 07:58:16 Instrument:Active Spacecraft Potential Control (ASPOC) Resource:NumericalData
The ASPOC instrument is a single unit consisting of an electronics box and two cylindrical ion emitter modules. The emitters produce indium ions at approximately 6 KeV, in a current of less than 50 microamps. This is done by field evaporation of indium in the apex field of a needle. In the basic feedback mode of operation, a measurement of the spacecraft potential is supplied to the instrument from either the electric field experiment (EFW) or the electron analyzer (PEACE). This information is then used to adjust the emission current to reduce the spacecraft potential to some predetermined value. By default, priority is given to the EFW data, because of the higher resolution (0.034 V vs. ~1.4 V) and the more straightforward way in which the potential is derived. A calibration mode will measure the current voltage characteristics of the spacecraft, at the beginning of the mission and occasionally later to account for changes in the photoemission properties of the surface. This measurement is carried out by sweeping the ion emission current in incremental steps over some convenient range, allowing simultaneous measurements of the spacecraft potential. The length of each step is 2 to 4 spin periods. In addition to providing an improved environment for other experiments, ASPOC will permit scientific investigations of the photoelectric characteristics of the dependence of the spacecraft potential on plasma parameters, and of spacecraft charging in different plasma environments to be carried out in the so called active mode. For more details of the Cluster mission, the spacecraft, and its instruments, see the report 'Cluster: mission, payload and supporting activities,' March 1993, ESA SP 1159, and the included article 'Active Spacecraft Potential Control: an ion emitter experiment for Cluster,' by W. Riedler et al., from which this information was obtained.

10) Double Star Quicklook Plots maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VSPO/DisplayData/DoubleStar/QLPLOTS
Start:2004-01-01 00:00:00 Observatory:Double Star 1 Cadence:
Stop:2016-09-14 07:59:49 Instrument:ASPOC (Active Space Potential Control) Resource:DisplayData
6-Hour GIF plots of multi-instrument quick look data from Double Star TC1 and TC2 spacecraft

11) Double Star 1-Min Summary Parameters maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VSPO/NumericalData/DoubleStar/SummaryParameters/PT1M
Start:2004-01-01 00:00:00 Observatory:Double Star 1 Cadence:1 minute
Stop:2016-09-14 08:00:05 Instrument:ASPOC (Active Space Potential Control) Resource:NumericalData
1-min summary parameters from Double Star TC1 and TC2 spacecraft, all instruments with various time coverages, plus spacecraft positions and separations and spin axis directions

12) MMS 1 Active Spacecraft Potential Control, Sensors 1 and 2 (ASPOC) Level 2, Quick-Look Survey maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VSPO/NumericalData/MMS/1/ASPOC/Survey/Level2/PT1S
Start:2015-04-16 00:00:00 Observatory:MMS-1 Cadence:1 second
Stop:2016-09-14 07:59:55 Instrument:MMS 1 Active Spacecraft Potential Control (ASPOC) Instrument Resource:NumericalData
MMS 1 Active Spacecraft Potential Control (ASPOC) - Sensors 1 and 2 Ion Beam Current Rates, Beam Energies, and Instrument Status variables. In tenuous plasma regions, the floating potential of a sunlit spacecraft is positively charged, reaching up to tens of Volts. The corresponding electric field disturbs the ambient plasma measurements obtained from electron and ion sensors and the large fluxes of attracted photo-electrons can significantly reduce the lifetime of the micro-channel plate. The electric field measurements can be also contaminated by the high spacecraft potential values. The Active Spacecraft Potential Control neutralizes the spacecraft potential by releasing positively charged Indium ions. The ASPOCs neutralize the electrical potential of the spacecraft, limiting or eliminating spurious electric fields that can contaminate measurements. This allows observations of the more scientifically important low-energy ions and electrons.

13) MMS 2 Active Spacecraft Potential Control, Sensors 1 and 2 (ASPOC) Level 2, Quick-Look Survey maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VSPO/NumericalData/MMS/2/ASPOC/Survey/Level2/PT1S
Start:2015-05-06 00:00:00 Observatory:MMS-2 Cadence:1 second
Stop:2016-09-14 08:00:01 Instrument:MMS 2 Active Spacecraft Potential Control (ASPOC) Instrument Resource:NumericalData
MMS 2 Active Spacecraft Potential Control (ASPOC) - Sensors 1 and 2 Ion Beam Current Rates, Beam Energies, and Instrument Status variables. In tenuous plasma regions, the floating potential of a sunlit spacecraft is positively charged, reaching up to tens of Volts. The corresponding electric field disturbs the ambient plasma measurements obtained from electron and ion sensors and the large fluxes of attracted photo-electrons can significantly reduce the lifetime of the micro-channel plate. The electric field measurements can be also contaminated by the high spacecraft potential values. The Active Spacecraft Potential Control neutralizes the spacecraft potential by releasing positively charged Indium ions. The ASPOCs neutralize the electrical potential of the spacecraft, limiting or eliminating spurious electric fields that can contaminate measurements. This allows observations of the more scientifically important low-energy ions and electrons.

14) MMS 3 Active Spacecraft Potential Control, Sensors 1 and 2 (ASPOC) Level 2, Quick-Look Survey maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VSPO/NumericalData/MMS/3/ASPOC/Survey/Level2/PT1S
Start:2015-05-01 00:00:00 Observatory:MMS-3 Cadence:1 second
Stop:2016-09-14 07:59:52 Instrument:MMS 3 Active Spacecraft Potential Control (ASPOC) Instrument Resource:NumericalData
MMS 3 Active Spacecraft Potential Control (ASPOC) - Sensors 1 and 2 Ion Beam Current Rates, Beam Energies, and Instrument Status variables. In tenuous plasma regions, the floating potential of a sunlit spacecraft is positively charged, reaching up to tens of Volts. The corresponding electric field disturbs the ambient plasma measurements obtained from electron and ion sensors and the large fluxes of attracted photo-electrons can significantly reduce the lifetime of the micro-channel plate. The electric field measurements can be also contaminated by the high spacecraft potential values. The Active Spacecraft Potential Control neutralizes the spacecraft potential by releasing positively charged Indium ions. The ASPOCs neutralize the electrical potential of the spacecraft, limiting or eliminating spurious electric fields that can contaminate measurements. This allows observations of the more scientifically important low-energy ions and electrons.

15) MMS 4 Active Spacecraft Potential Control, Sensors 1 and 2 (ASPOC) Level 2, Quick-Look Survey maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VSPO/NumericalData/MMS/4/ASPOC/Survey/Level2/PT1S
Start:2015-04-19 00:00:00 Observatory:MMS-4 Cadence:1 second
Stop:2016-09-14 07:59:58 Instrument:MMS 4 Active Spacecraft Potential Control (ASPOC) Instrument Resource:NumericalData
MMS 4 Active Spacecraft Potential Control (ASPOC) - Sensors 1 and 2 Ion Beam Current Rates, Beam Energies, and Instrument Status variables. In tenuous plasma regions, the floating potential of a sunlit spacecraft is positively charged, reaching up to tens of Volts. The corresponding electric field disturbs the ambient plasma measurements obtained from electron and ion sensors and the large fluxes of attracted photo-electrons can significantly reduce the lifetime of the micro-channel plate. The electric field measurements can be also contaminated by the high spacecraft potential values. The Active Spacecraft Potential Control neutralizes the spacecraft potential by releasing positively charged Indium ions. The ASPOCs neutralize the electrical potential of the spacecraft, limiting or eliminating spurious electric fields that can contaminate measurements. This allows observations of the more scientifically important low-energy ions and electrons.

Showing 1 - 15