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1) Akebono PWS NPW Data maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VWO/NumericalData/Akebono/PWS/E.NPW.PT2S
Start:1989-02-24 13:32:00 Observatory: Cadence:2 seconds
Stop:2014-04-20 01:02:21 Instrument: Resource:NumericalData
The Plasma Wave Observation and Sounder Experiment (PWS) observes both natural (NPW) and stimulated (SPW) plasma waves. The frequency range of the NPW system is 20 kHz to 5.12 MHz. These CDF data consist of Electric Field intensities measured by the PWS Recevier 1 (RX1) and Receiver 2 (RX2) units.

2) CRRES electric field and convection drift data maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VMO/NumericalData/CRRES/LPI/PT30S
Start:1990-10-11 00:00:00 Observatory:CRRES Cadence:30 seconds
Stop:1991-10-13 00:00:00 Instrument:Langmuir Probe Instrument Resource:NumericalData
This data set includes the electric field and convection drift information from the CRRES spacecraft. The langmuir probe instrument data is at 30 s resolution. The files include the electric field vectors, elcetric field magnitude, and the convection drift vectors from both the spherical sensors and the cylindrical antennas.

3) Cluster II Rumba Prime Parameter Active Spacecraft Potential Control (ASPOC) Data maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VMO/NumericalData/Cluster-Rumba/ASPOC/PrimeParameter/PT4S
Start:2001-01-30 00:00:00 Observatory:Cluster FM5 (Rumba) Cadence:4 seconds
Stop:2014-04-20 01:02:10 Instrument:Active Spacecraft Potential Control (ASPOC) Resource:NumericalData
The ASPOC instrument is a single unit consisting of an electronics box and two cylindrical ion emitter modules. The emitters produce indium ions at approximately 6 KeV, in a current of less than 50 microamps. This is done by field evaporation of indium in the apex field of a needle. In the basic feedback mode of operation, a measurement of the spacecraft potential is supplied to the instrument from either the electric field experiment (EFW) or the electron analyzer (PEACE). This information is then used to adjust the emission current to reduce the spacecraft potential to some predetermined value. By default, priority is given to the EFW data, because of the higher resolution (0.034 V vs. ~1.4 V) and the more straightforward way in which the potential is derived. A calibration mode will measure the current voltage characteristics of the spacecraft, at the beginning of the mission and occasionally later to account for changes in the photoemission properties of the surface. This measurement is carried out by sweeping the ion emission current in incremental steps over some convenient range, allowing simultaneous measurements of the spacecraft potential. The length of each step is 2 to 4 spin periods. In addition to providing an improved environment for other experiments, ASPOC will permit scientific investigations of the photoelectric characteristics of the dependence of the spacecraft potential on plasma parameters, and of spacecraft charging in different plasma environments to be carried out in the so called active mode. For more details of the Cluster mission, the spacecraft, and its instruments, see the report 'Cluster: mission, payload and supporting activities,' March 1993, ESA SP 1159, and the included article 'Active Spacecraft Potential Control: an ion emitter experiment for Cluster,' by W. Riedler et al., from which this information was obtained.

4) Cluster II Rumba Prime Parameter Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Data maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VMO/NumericalData/Cluster-Rumba/EDI/PrimeParameter/4S
Start:2000-12-09 00:00:00 Observatory:Cluster FM5 (Rumba) Cadence:4 seconds
Stop:2014-04-20 01:02:10 Instrument:Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Resource:NumericalData
This instrument (EDI: Electron Drift Instrument) measures the drift of a weak beam of test electrons that, when emitted in certain directions, return to the spacecraft after one gyration. This drift is related to the electric field and the gradient in the magnetic field, and these quantities can, by the use of different electron energies, be determined separately. The fundamental time step to determine the new parameters and direct the beams and the detectors is 2 ms. Inter-experiment links include: magnetic field information from FGM and STAFF, a blanking pulse received from WHISPER to warn of possible interference from that active experiment, and a similar blanking pulse sent to PEACE when the EDI electron beam could interfere with the PEACE electron measurement. For more details of the Cluster mission, the spacecraft, and its instruments, see the report Cluster: mission, payload and supporting activities, March 1993, ESA SP-1159, and the included article The Electron Drift Instrument for Cluster, by G. Paschmann et al., from which this information was obtained.

5) Cluster II Rumba Prime Parameter Electric Field and Waves (EFW) Data maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VMO/NumericalData/Cluster-Rumba/EFW/PrimeParameter/4S
Start:2000-12-09 00:00:00 Observatory:Cluster FM5 (Rumba) Cadence:4 seconds
Stop:2014-04-20 01:02:10 Instrument:Electric Field and Waves (EFW) Resource:NumericalData
The EFW (Electric Field and Waves) instrument consists of four orthogonal spherical sensors deployed from 50 m cable booms in the spin plane of the spacecraft, plus four deployment units and a main electronics unit. Each deployment unit deploys a multiconductor cable and tip-mounted spherical sensor. Each opposing pair of cables will be symmetrically deployed to a tip-to-tip distance of approximately 100 m, except for about a week at the beginning of the mission when 70 m will be used for one boom pair (the Z-booms) and 100 m for the other pair. The potentials of the spherical sensor and nearby conductors are controlled by the microprocessor to minimize errors associated with photoelectron fluxes to and from the spheres. Output signals from the sensor preamplifiers are provided to the wave instruments for analysis of high frequency wave phenomena. There is a 1 MB burst memory and tow fast A/D conversion circuits for recording electric field wave forms for time resolutions of up to 36,000 samples/s. Data gathered in the burst memory will be played back through the telemetry stream allocated to the instrument by pre-empting a portion of the real-time data. Incoming data are continuously monitored by algorithms in the software to determine whether to trigger the burst-playback mode. A large number of sampling modes is possible, yielding four possible telemetry rates from 1.440-29.440 Kbps. This data stream is transferred via the DWP instrument. The main measured quantities will be, in various modes: (1) the instantaneous spin-plane components of the electric field vector, from 0.1-700 V/Km, with time resolution down to 0.1 ms, in four frequency ranges from DC to upper limits of 10 Hz, 180 Hz, 4 KHz, or 32 KHz; (2) the AC electric field components from 10 Hz to 8 KHz, within the dynamic range of ~3 mV/Km to 10 V/Km; (3) plasma density fluctuations within the range of 1-100/cm and in three frequency ranges from 0 Hz to upper limits of 10 Hz, 180 Hz, or 4 KHz; and, (4) density and temperature (in Langmuir sweeps) in the eV range, with a dynamic range of 1-100/cm. There is also a frequency counter covering the range 10-200 KHz. On-board calculations of least-square fits to the electric field data over one spacecraft spin period (4 s) will provide a baseline of high-quality two-dimensional electric field components that are present in the telemetry stream, except for periods when three or four sensors are in current mode. The spacecraft potential is calculated and transmitted via DWP to other instruments on board. The three components from the search coil instrument (WHISPER) are also available in EFW with a bandwidth of 4 KHz. For more details of the Cluster mission, the spacecraft, and its instruments, see the report Cluster: mission, payload and supporting activities, March 1993, ESA SP-1159, and the included article The Spherical Probe Electric Field and Waves experiment for the Cluster Mission, by G. Gustafsson et al., from which this information was obtained.

6) Cluster II Rumba Prime Parameter Spatio-Temporal Analysis of Magnetic Field Fluctuations (STAFF) Data maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VMO/NumericalData/Cluster-Rumba/STAFF/PrimeParameter/4S
Start:2000-12-09 00:00:00 Observatory:Cluster FM5 (Rumba) Cadence:4 seconds
Stop:2014-04-20 01:02:10 Instrument:Spatio-Temporal Analysis of Magnetic Field Fluctuations (STAFF) Resource:NumericalData
The Spatio-Temporal Analysis of Magnetic Field Fluctuations (STAFF) experiment provides magnetic field power spectral density values parallel and perpendicular to the magnetic field and the electric field power spectral density values for several frequency ranges. For more details of the Cluster mission, the spacecraft, and its instruments, see the report Cluster: mission, payload and supporting activities, March 1993, ESA SP-1159, and the included article The STAFF (Spatio-Temporal Analysis of Field Fluctuations) Experiment for the Cluster Mission, by N. Cornilleau-Wehrlin et al., from which this information was obtained.

7) Cluster 1 Wideband Data Plasma Wave Receiver/High Time Resolution Waveform Data maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VWO/NumericalData/Cluster-Rumba/WBD/PT0.0000046S
Start:2001-02-03 05:26:00 Observatory:Cluster FM5 (Rumba) Cadence:0.0000046 seconds
Stop:2014-04-20 01:02:22 Instrument:Wide Band Data (WBD) Resource:NumericalData
The following description applies to the Wideband Data (WBD) Plasma Wave Receivers on all four Cluster satellites, each satellite being uniquely identified by its number (1 through 4) or its given name (Rumba, Salsa, Samba, Tango, respectively). High time resolution calibrated waveform data sampled in one of 3 frequency bands in the range 0-577 kHz along one axis using either an electric field antenna or a magnetic search coil sensor. The dataset also includes instrument mode, data quality and the angles required to orient the measurement with respect to the magnetic field and to the GSE coordinate system. The AC electric field data are obtained by using one of the two 88m spin plane electric field antennas of the EFW (Electric Fields and Waves) instrument as a sensor. The AC magnetic field data are obtained by using one of the two search coil magnetometers (one in the spin plane, the other along the spin axis) of the STAFF (Spatio-Temporal Analysis of Field Fluctuations) instrument as a sensor. The WBD data are obtained in one of three filter bandwidth modes: (1) 9.5 kHz, (2) 19 kHz, or (3) 77 kHz. The minimum frequency of each of these three frequency bands can be shifted up (converted) from the default 0 kHz base frequency by 125.454, 250.908 or 501.816 kHz. The time resolution of the data shown in the plots is determined from the WBD instrument mode. The highest time resolution data (generally the 77 kHz bandwidth mode) are sampled at 4.6 microseconds in the time domain (~4.7 milliseconds in the frequency domain using a standard 1024 point FFT). The lowest time resolution data (generally the 9.5 kHz bandwidth mode) are sampled at 36.5 microseconds in the time domain (~37.3 milliseconds in the frequency domain using a standard 1024 point FFT). The availability of these files depends on times of DSN and Panska Ves ground station telemetry downlinks. A list of the status of the WBD instrument on each spacecraft, the telemetry time spans, operating modes and other details are available under Science Data Availability on the University of Iowa Cluster WBD web site at http://www- pw.physics.uiowa.edu/cluster/ and through the documentation section of the Cluster Active Archive (CAA) (http://caa.estec.esa.int/caa). Details on Cluster WBD Interpretation Issues and Caveats can be found at http://www- pw.physics.uiowa.edu/cluster/ by clicking on the links next to the Caution symbol in the listing on the left side of the web site. These documents are also available from the Documentation section of the CAA website. For further details on the Cluster WBD data products see Pickett, J.S., et al., "Cluster Wideband Data Products in the Cluster Active Archive" in _The Cluster Active Archive_, 2010, Springer-Verlag, pp 169-183, and the Cluster WBD User Guide archived at the CAA website in the Documentation section. ... CALIBRATION: ... The procedure used in computing the calibrated Electric Field and Magnetic Field values found in this file can be obtained from the Cluster WBD Calibration Report archived at the CAA website in the Documentation section. Because the calibration was applied in the time domain using simple equations the raw counts actually measured by the WBD instrument can be obtained by using these equations and solving for 'Raw Counts', keeping in mind that this number is an Integer ranging from 0 to 255. Since DC offset is a real number, the resultant when solving for raw counts will need to be converted to the nearest whole number. A sample IDL routine for reverse calibrating to obtain 'Raw Counts' is provided in the WBD Calibration Report archived at the CAA. ... CONVERSION TO FREQUENCY DOMAIN: ... In order to convert the WBD data to the frequency domain via an FFT, the following steps need to be carried out: 1) If Electric Field, first divide calibrated data values by 1000 to get V/m; 2) Apply window of preference, if any (such as Hann, etc.); 3) Divide data values by sqrt(2) to get back to the rms domain; 4) perform FFT (see Bandwidth variable notes for non-continuous modes and/or the WBD User Guide archived at the CAA); 5) divide by the noise bandwidth, which is equal to the sampling frequency divided by the FFT size (see table below for appropriate sampling frequency); 6) multiply by the appropriate constant for the window used, if any. These steps are more fully explained in the WBD Calibration Report archived at the CAA.... +--------------------------+ | Bandwidth | Sample Rate | |-----------|--------------| | 9.5 kHz | 27.443 kHz | | 19 kHz | 54.886 kHz | | 77 kHz | 219.544 kHz | +--------------------------+ COORDINATE SYSTEM USED: ... One axis measurements made in the Antenna Coordinate System, i.e., if electric field measurement, it will either be Ey or Ez, both of which are in the spin plane of the spacecraft, and if magnetic field measurement, it will either be Bx, along the spin axis, or By, in spin plane. The user of WBD data should refer to the WBD User Guide, archived at the CAA, Section 5.4.1 and Figure 5.3 for a description of the three orientation angles provided in these files. Since WBD measurements are made along one axis only, these three angles provide the only means for orienting the WBD measurements with respect to a geocentric coordinate system and to the magnetic field direction ...

8) Cluster II Rumba Wide Band Data (WBD) Prime Parameters maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VMO/NumericalData/Cluster-Rumba/WBD/PrimeParameter/PT0.02S
Start:2001-02-04 00:00:00 Observatory:Cluster FM5 (Rumba) Cadence:0.02 seconds
Stop:2014-04-20 01:02:10 Instrument:Wide Band Data (WBD) Resource:NumericalData
The WBD (Wide Band Data) investigation is designed to provide high-resolution frequency/time spectra of plasma waves in the Earth's magnetosphere. These data files contain information on the band width, resolution, antenna angles, offsets, magnetic and electric field information. For more details of the Cluster mission, the spacecraft, and its instruments, see the report ``Cluster: mission, payload and supporting activities,'' March 1993, ESA SP-1159, and the included article ``The Wideband Plasma Wave Investigation,'' by D. A. Gurnett et al., from which this information was obtained.

9) Cluster 1 WHISPER Natural Electric Power Spectral Density maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VWO/NumericalData/Cluster-Rumba/WHISPER/PT2S
Start:2000-08-16 12:39:00 Observatory:Cluster FM5 (Rumba) Cadence:2.14 seconds
Stop:2014-04-20 01:02:22 Instrument:Waves of HF and Sounder for Probing Electron Density by Relaxation (WHISPER) Resource:NumericalData
The Waves of HIgh frequency and Sounder for Probing of Electron density by Relaxation (WHISPER) performs the measurement of the electron density on the four satellites of the Cluster project. The two main purposes of the WHISPER experiment are to record the natural waves and to make a diagnostic of the electron density using the sounding technique. The various working modes and the fourier transforms calculated on board provide a good frequency resolution obtained in the bandwidth 2-83 kHz. Onboard data compression by the Digital Wave Processing (DWP) intrument allows a good dynamic and level resolution of the electric signal amplitude.

10) Cluster 1 WHISPER Active Electric Power Spectral Density maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VWO/NumericalData/Cluster-Rumba/WHISPER/PT52S
Start:2000-08-16 12:39:00 Observatory:Cluster FM5 (Rumba) Cadence:52 seconds
Stop:2014-04-20 01:02:22 Instrument:Waves of HF and Sounder for Probing Electron Density by Relaxation (WHISPER) Resource:NumericalData
The Waves of HIgh frequency and Sounder for Probing of Electron density by Relaxation (WHISPER) performs the measurement of the electron density on the four satellites of the Cluster project. The two main purposes of the WHISPER experiment are to record the natural waves and to make a diagnostic of the electron density using the sounding technique. The various working modes and the fourier transforms calculated on board provide a good frequency resolution obtained in the bandwidth 2-83 kHz. Onboard data compression by the Digital Wave Processing (DWP) intrument allows a good dynamic and level resolution of the electric signal amplitude.

11) Cluster II Rumba Prime Parameter Waves of HF and Sounder for Probing Electron Density by Relaxation (WHISPER) Data maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VMO/NumericalData/Cluster-Rumba/WHISPER/PrimeParameter/4S
Start:2000-12-10 00:00:00 Observatory:Cluster FM5 (Rumba) Cadence:4 seconds
Stop:2014-04-20 01:02:10 Instrument:Waves of HF and Sounder for Probing Electron Density by Relaxation (WHISPER) Resource:NumericalData
The Waves of HF and Sounder for Probing Electron Density by Relaxation (WHISPER) experiment provides measurements of the electron density via active sounding of plasma resonances and records via passive wave analysis the natural wave emissions in the high-frequency range, from 4-80 KHz. For more details of the Cluster mission, the spacecraft, and its instruments, see the report Cluster: mission, payload and supporting activities, March 1993, ESA SP-1159, and the included article WHISPER, a Sounder and High-Frequency Wave Analyser Experiment, by P. M. E. Decreau et al., from which this information was obtained.

12) Cluster II Salsa Prime Parameter Active Spacecraft Potential Control (ASPOC) Data maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VMO/NumericalData/Cluster-Salsa/ASPOC/PrimeParameter/PT4S
Start:2001-01-30 00:00:00 Observatory:Cluster FM6 (Salsa) Cadence:4 seconds
Stop:2014-04-20 01:01:14 Instrument:Active Spacecraft Potential Control (ASPOC) Resource:NumericalData
The ASPOC instrument is a single unit consisting of an electronics box and two cylindrical ion emitter modules. The emitters produce indium ions at approximately 6 KeV, in a current of less than 50 microamps. This is done by field evaporation of indium in the apex field of a needle. In the basic feedback mode of operation, a measurement of the spacecraft potential is supplied to the instrument from either the electric field experiment (EFW) or the electron analyzer (PEACE). This information is then used to adjust the emission current to reduce the spacecraft potential to some predetermined value. By default, priority is given to the EFW data, because of the higher resolution (0.034 V vs. ~1.4 V) and the more straightforward way in which the potential is derived. A calibration mode will measure the current voltage characteristics of the spacecraft, at the beginning of the mission and occasionally later to account for changes in the photoemission properties of the surface. This measurement is carried out by sweeping the ion emission current in incremental steps over some convenient range, allowing simultaneous measurements of the spacecraft potential. The length of each step is 2 to 4 spin periods. In addition to providing an improved environment for other experiments, ASPOC will permit scientific investigations of the photoelectric characteristics of the dependence of the spacecraft potential on plasma parameters, and of spacecraft charging in different plasma environments to be carried out in the so called active mode. For more details of the Cluster mission, the spacecraft, and its instruments, see the report 'Cluster: mission, payload and supporting activities,' March 1993, ESA SP 1159, and the included article 'Active Spacecraft Potential Control: an ion emitter experiment for Cluster,' by W. Riedler et al., from which this information was obtained.

13) Cluster II Salsa Prime Parameter Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Data maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VMO/NumericalData/Cluster-Salsa/EDI/PrimeParameter/4S
Start:2000-12-09 00:00:00 Observatory:Cluster FM6 (Salsa) Cadence:4 seconds
Stop:2014-04-20 01:01:14 Instrument:Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Resource:NumericalData
This instrument (EDI: Electron Drift Instrument) measures the drift of a weak beam of test electrons that, when emitted in certain directions, return to the spacecraft after one gyration. This drift is related to the electric field and the gradient in the magnetic field, and these quantities can, by the use of different electron energies, be determined separately. The fundamental time step to determine the new parameters and direct the beams and the detectors is 2 ms. Inter-experiment links include: magnetic field information from FGM and STAFF, a blanking pulse received from WHISPER to warn of possible interference from that active experiment, and a similar blanking pulse sent to PEACE when the EDI electron beam could interfere with the PEACE electron measurement. For more details of the Cluster mission, the spacecraft, and its instruments, see the report Cluster: mission, payload and supporting activities, March 1993, ESA SP-1159, and the included article The Electron Drift Instrument for Cluster, by G. Paschmann et al., from which this information was obtained.

14) Cluster II Salsa Prime Parameter Electric Field and Waves (EFW) Data maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VMO/NumericalData/Cluster-Salsa/EFW/PrimeParameter/4S
Start:2000-12-09 00:00:00 Observatory:Cluster FM6 (Salsa) Cadence:4 seconds
Stop:2014-04-20 01:01:14 Instrument:Electric Field and Waves (EFW) Resource:NumericalData
The EFW (Electric Field and Waves) instrument consists of four orthogonal spherical sensors deployed from 50 m cable booms in the spin plane of the spacecraft, plus four deployment units and a main electronics unit. Each deployment unit deploys a multiconductor cable and tip-mounted spherical sensor. Each opposing pair of cables will be symmetrically deployed to a tip-to-tip distance of approximately 100 m, except for about a week at the beginning of the mission when 70 m will be used for one boom pair (the Z-booms) and 100 m for the other pair. The potentials of the spherical sensor and nearby conductors are controlled by the microprocessor to minimize errors associated with photoelectron fluxes to and from the spheres. Output signals from the sensor preamplifiers are provided to the wave instruments for analysis of high frequency wave phenomena. There is a 1 MB burst memory and tow fast A/D conversion circuits for recording electric field wave forms for time resolutions of up to 36,000 samples/s. Data gathered in the burst memory will be played back through the telemetry stream allocated to the instrument by pre-empting a portion of the real-time data. Incoming data are continuously monitored by algorithms in the software to determine whether to trigger the burst-playback mode. A large number of sampling modes is possible, yielding four possible telemetry rates from 1.440-29.440 Kbps. This data stream is transferred via the DWP instrument. The main measured quantities will be, in various modes: (1) the instantaneous spin-plane components of the electric field vector, from 0.1-700 V/Km, with time resolution down to 0.1 ms, in four frequency ranges from DC to upper limits of 10 Hz, 180 Hz, 4 KHz, or 32 KHz; (2) the AC electric field components from 10 Hz to 8 KHz, within the dynamic range of ~3 mV/Km to 10 V/Km; (3) plasma density fluctuations within the range of 1-100/cm and in three frequency ranges from 0 Hz to upper limits of 10 Hz, 180 Hz, or 4 KHz; and, (4) density and temperature (in Langmuir sweeps) in the eV range, with a dynamic range of 1-100/cm. There is also a frequency counter covering the range 10-200 KHz. On-board calculations of least-square fits to the electric field data over one spacecraft spin period (4 s) will provide a baseline of high-quality two-dimensional electric field components that are present in the telemetry stream, except for periods when three or four sensors are in current mode. The spacecraft potential is calculated and transmitted via DWP to other instruments on board. The three components from the search coil instrument (WHISPER) are also available in EFW with a bandwidth of 4 KHz. For more details of the Cluster mission, the spacecraft, and its instruments, see the report Cluster: mission, payload and supporting activities, March 1993, ESA SP-1159, and the included article The Spherical Probe Electric Field and Waves experiment for the Cluster Mission, by G. Gustafsson et al., from which this information was obtained.

15) Cluster II Salsa Prime Parameter Spatio-Temporal Analysis of Magnetic Field Fluctuations (STAFF) Data maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VMO/NumericalData/Cluster-Salsa/STAFF/PrimeParameter/4S
Start:2000-12-09 00:00:00 Observatory:Cluster FM6 (Salsa) Cadence:4 seconds
Stop:2014-04-20 01:01:14 Instrument:Spatio-Temporal Analysis of Magnetic Field Fluctuations (STAFF) Resource:NumericalData
The Spatio-Temporal Analysis of Magnetic Field Fluctuations (STAFF) experiment provides magnetic field power spectral density values parallel and perpendicular to the magnetic field and the electric field power spectral density values for several frequency ranges. For more details of the Cluster mission, the spacecraft, and its instruments, see the report Cluster: mission, payload and supporting activities, March 1993, ESA SP-1159, and the included article The STAFF (Spatio-Temporal Analysis of Field Fluctuations) Experiment for the Cluster Mission, by N. Cornilleau-Wehrlin et al., from which this information was obtained.

16) Cluster 2 Wideband Data Plasma Wave Receiver/High Time Resolution Waveform Data maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VWO/NumericalData/Cluster-Salsa/WBD/PT0.0000046S
Start:2001-02-03 05:26:00 Observatory:Cluster FM6 (Salsa) Cadence:0.0000046 seconds
Stop:2014-04-20 01:02:21 Instrument:Wide Band Data (WBD) Resource:NumericalData
The following description applies to the Wideband Data (WBD) Plasma Wave Receivers on all four Cluster satellites, each satellite being uniquely identified by its number (1 through 4) or its given name (Rumba, Salsa, Samba, Tango, respectively). High time resolution calibrated waveform data sampled in one of 3 frequency bands in the range 0-577 kHz along one axis using either an electric field antenna or a magnetic search coil sensor. The dataset also includes instrument mode, data quality and the angles required to orient the measurement with respect to the magnetic field and to the GSE coordinate system. The AC electric field data are obtained by using one of the two 88m spin plane electric field antennas of the EFW (Electric Fields and Waves) instrument as a sensor. The AC magnetic field data are obtained by using one of the two search coil magnetometers (one in the spin plane, the other along the spin axis) of the STAFF (Spatio-Temporal Analysis of Field Fluctuations) instrument as a sensor. The WBD data are obtained in one of three filter bandwidth modes: (1) 9.5 kHz, (2) 19 kHz, or (3) 77 kHz. The minimum frequency of each of these three frequency bands can be shifted up (converted) from the default 0 kHz base frequency by 125.454, 250.908 or 501.816 kHz. The time resolution of the data shown in the plots is determined from the WBD instrument mode. The highest time resolution data (generally the 77 kHz bandwidth mode) are sampled at 4.6 microseconds in the time domain (~4.7 milliseconds in the frequency domain using a standard 1024 point FFT). The lowest time resolution data (generally the 9.5 kHz bandwidth mode) are sampled at 36.5 microseconds in the time domain (~37.3 milliseconds in the frequency domain using a standard 1024 point FFT). The availability of these files depends on times of DSN and Panska Ves ground station telemetry downlinks. A list of the status of the WBD instrument on each spacecraft, the telemetry time spans, operating modes and other details are available under Science Data Availability on the University of Iowa Cluster WBD web site at http://www- pw.physics.uiowa.edu/cluster/ and through the documentation section of the Cluster Active Archive (CAA) (http://caa.estec.esa.int/caa). Details on Cluster WBD Interpretation Issues and Caveats can be found at http://www- pw.physics.uiowa.edu/cluster/ by clicking on the links next to the Caution symbol in the listing on the left side of the web site. These documents are also available from the Documentation section of the CAA website. For further details on the Cluster WBD data products see Pickett, J.S., et al., "Cluster Wideband Data Products in the Cluster Active Archive" in _The Cluster Active Archive_, 2010, Springer-Verlag, pp 169-183, and the Cluster WBD User Guide archived at the CAA website in the Documentation section. ... CALIBRATION: ... The procedure used in computing the calibrated Electric Field and Magnetic Field values found in this file can be obtained from the Cluster WBD Calibration Report archived at the CAA website in the Documentation section. Because the calibration was applied in the time domain using simple equations the raw counts actually measured by the WBD instrument can be obtained by using these equations and solving for 'Raw Counts', keeping in mind that this number is an Integer ranging from 0 to 255. Since DC offset is a real number, the resultant when solving for raw counts will need to be converted to the nearest whole number. A sample IDL routine for reverse calibrating to obtain 'Raw Counts' is provided in the WBD Calibration Report archived at the CAA. ... CONVERSION TO FREQUENCY DOMAIN: ... In order to convert the WBD data to the frequency domain via an FFT, the following steps need to be carried out: 1) If Electric Field, first divide calibrated data values by 1000 to get V/m; 2) Apply window of preference, if any (such as Hann, etc.); 3) Divide data values by sqrt(2) to get back to the rms domain; 4) perform FFT (see Bandwidth variable notes for non-continuous modes and/or the WBD User Guide archived at the CAA); 5) divide by the noise bandwidth, which is equal to the sampling frequency divided by the FFT size (see table below for appropriate sampling frequency); 6) multiply by the appropriate constant for the window used, if any. These steps are more fully explained in the WBD Calibration Report archived at the CAA.... +--------------------------+ | Bandwidth | Sample Rate | |-----------|--------------| | 9.5 kHz | 27.443 kHz | | 19 kHz | 54.886 kHz | | 77 kHz | 219.544 kHz | +--------------------------+ COORDINATE SYSTEM USED: ... One axis measurements made in the Antenna Coordinate System, i.e., if electric field measurement, it will either be Ey or Ez, both of which are in the spin plane of the spacecraft, and if magnetic field measurement, it will either be Bx, along the spin axis, or By, in spin plane. The user of WBD data should refer to the WBD User Guide, archived at the CAA, Section 5.4.1 and Figure 5.3 for a description of the three orientation angles provided in these files. Since WBD measurements are made along one axis only, these three angles provide the only means for orienting the WBD measurements with respect to a geocentric coordinate system and to the magnetic field direction ...

17) Cluster 2 WHISPER Natural Electric Power Spectral Density maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VWO/NumericalData/Cluster-Salsa/WHISPER/PT2S
Start:2000-08-16 12:39:00 Observatory:Cluster FM6 (Salsa) Cadence:2.14 seconds
Stop:2014-04-20 01:02:21 Instrument:Waves of HF and Sounder for Probing Electron Density by Relaxation (WHISPER) Resource:NumericalData
The Waves of HIgh frequency and Sounder for Probing of Electron density by Relaxation (WHISPER) performs the measurement of the electron density on the four satellites of the Cluster project. The two main purposes of the WHISPER experiment are to record the natural waves and to make a diagnostic of the electron density using the sounding technique. The various working modes and the fourier transforms calculated on board provide a good frequency resolution obtained in the bandwidth 2-83 kHz. Onboard data compression by the Digital Wave Processing (DWP) intrument allows a good dynamic and level resolution of the electric signal amplitude.

18) Cluster 2 WHISPER Active Electric Power Spectral Density maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VWO/NumericalData/Cluster-Salsa/WHISPER/PT52S
Start:2000-08-16 12:39:00 Observatory:Cluster FM6 (Salsa) Cadence:52 seconds
Stop:2014-04-20 01:02:21 Instrument:Waves of HF and Sounder for Probing Electron Density by Relaxation (WHISPER) Resource:NumericalData
The Waves of HIgh frequency and Sounder for Probing of Electron density by Relaxation (WHISPER) performs the measurement of the electron density on the four satellites of the Cluster project. The two main purposes of the WHISPER experiment are to record the natural waves and to make a diagnostic of the electron density using the sounding technique. The various working modes and the fourier transforms calculated on board provide a good frequency resolution obtained in the bandwidth 2-83 kHz. Onboard data compression by the Digital Wave Processing (DWP) intrument allows a good dynamic and level resolution of the electric signal amplitude.

19) Cluster II Salsa Prime Parameter Waves of HF and Sounder for Probing Electron Density by Relaxation (WHISPER) Data maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VMO/NumericalData/Cluster-Salsa/WHISPER/PrimeParameter/4S
Start:2000-12-10 00:00:00 Observatory:Cluster FM6 (Salsa) Cadence:4 seconds
Stop:2014-04-20 01:01:14 Instrument:Waves of HF and Sounder for Probing Electron Density by Relaxation (WHISPER) Resource:NumericalData
The Waves of HF and Sounder for Probing Electron Density by Relaxation (WHISPER) experiment provides measurements of the electron density via active sounding of plasma resonances and records via passive wave analysis the natural wave emissions in the high-frequency range, from 4-80 KHz. For more details of the Cluster mission, the spacecraft, and its instruments, see the report Cluster: mission, payload and supporting activities, March 1993, ESA SP-1159, and the included article WHISPER, a Sounder and High-Frequency Wave Analyser Experiment, by P. M. E. Decreau et al., from which this information was obtained.

20) Cluster II Samba Prime Parameter Active Spacecraft Potential Control (ASPOC) Data maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VMO/NumericalData/Cluster-Samba/ASPOC/PrimeParameter/PT4S
Start:2001-01-30 00:00:00 Observatory:Cluster FM7 (Samba) Cadence:4 seconds
Stop:2014-04-20 01:01:50 Instrument:Active Spacecraft Potential Control (ASPOC) Resource:NumericalData
The ASPOC instrument is a single unit consisting of an electronics box and two cylindrical ion emitter modules. The emitters produce indium ions at approximately 6 KeV, in a current of less than 50 microamps. This is done by field evaporation of indium in the apex field of a needle. In the basic feedback mode of operation, a measurement of the spacecraft potential is supplied to the instrument from either the electric field experiment (EFW) or the electron analyzer (PEACE). This information is then used to adjust the emission current to reduce the spacecraft potential to some predetermined value. By default, priority is given to the EFW data, because of the higher resolution (0.034 V vs. ~1.4 V) and the more straightforward way in which the potential is derived. A calibration mode will measure the current voltage characteristics of the spacecraft, at the beginning of the mission and occasionally later to account for changes in the photoemission properties of the surface. This measurement is carried out by sweeping the ion emission current in incremental steps over some convenient range, allowing simultaneous measurements of the spacecraft potential. The length of each step is 2 to 4 spin periods. In addition to providing an improved environment for other experiments, ASPOC will permit scientific investigations of the photoelectric characteristics of the dependence of the spacecraft potential on plasma parameters, and of spacecraft charging in different plasma environments to be carried out in the so called active mode. For more details of the Cluster mission, the spacecraft, and its instruments, see the report 'Cluster: mission, payload and supporting activities,' March 1993, ESA SP 1159, and the included article 'Active Spacecraft Potential Control: an ion emitter experiment for Cluster,' by W. Riedler et al., from which this information was obtained.

21) Cluster II Samba Prime Parameter Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Data maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VMO/NumericalData/Cluster-Samba/EDI/PrimeParameter/4S
Start:2000-12-09 00:00:00 Observatory:Cluster FM7 (Samba) Cadence:4 seconds
Stop:2014-04-20 01:01:50 Instrument:Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Resource:NumericalData
This instrument (EDI: Electron Drift Instrument) measures the drift of a weak beam of test electrons that, when emitted in certain directions, return to the spacecraft after one gyration. This drift is related to the electric field and the gradient in the magnetic field, and these quantities can, by the use of different electron energies, be determined separately. The fundamental time step to determine the new parameters and direct the beams and the detectors is 2 ms. Inter-experiment links include: magnetic field information from FGM and STAFF, a blanking pulse received from WHISPER to warn of possible interference from that active experiment, and a similar blanking pulse sent to PEACE when the EDI electron beam could interfere with the PEACE electron measurement. For more details of the Cluster mission, the spacecraft, and its instruments, see the report Cluster: mission, payload and supporting activities, March 1993, ESA SP-1159, and the included article The Electron Drift Instrument for Cluster, by G. Paschmann et al., from which this information was obtained.

22) Cluster II Samba Prime Parameter Electric Field and Waves (EFW) Data maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VMO/NumericalData/Cluster-Samba/EFW/PrimeParameter/4S
Start:2000-12-09 00:00:00 Observatory:Cluster FM7 (Samba) Cadence:4 seconds
Stop:2014-04-20 01:01:49 Instrument:Electric Field and Waves (EFW) Resource:NumericalData
The EFW (Electric Field and Waves) instrument consists of four orthogonal spherical sensors deployed from 50 m cable booms in the spin plane of the spacecraft, plus four deployment units and a main electronics unit. Each deployment unit deploys a multiconductor cable and tip-mounted spherical sensor. Each opposing pair of cables will be symmetrically deployed to a tip-to-tip distance of approximately 100 m, except for about a week at the beginning of the mission when 70 m will be used for one boom pair (the Z-booms) and 100 m for the other pair. The potentials of the spherical sensor and nearby conductors are controlled by the microprocessor to minimize errors associated with photoelectron fluxes to and from the spheres. Output signals from the sensor preamplifiers are provided to the wave instruments for analysis of high frequency wave phenomena. There is a 1 MB burst memory and tow fast A/D conversion circuits for recording electric field wave forms for time resolutions of up to 36,000 samples/s. Data gathered in the burst memory will be played back through the telemetry stream allocated to the instrument by pre-empting a portion of the real-time data. Incoming data are continuously monitored by algorithms in the software to determine whether to trigger the burst-playback mode. A large number of sampling modes is possible, yielding four possible telemetry rates from 1.440-29.440 Kbps. This data stream is transferred via the DWP instrument. The main measured quantities will be, in various modes: (1) the instantaneous spin-plane components of the electric field vector, from 0.1-700 V/Km, with time resolution down to 0.1 ms, in four frequency ranges from DC to upper limits of 10 Hz, 180 Hz, 4 KHz, or 32 KHz; (2) the AC electric field components from 10 Hz to 8 KHz, within the dynamic range of ~3 mV/Km to 10 V/Km; (3) plasma density fluctuations within the range of 1-100/cm and in three frequency ranges from 0 Hz to upper limits of 10 Hz, 180 Hz, or 4 KHz; and, (4) density and temperature (in Langmuir sweeps) in the eV range, with a dynamic range of 1-100/cm. There is also a frequency counter covering the range 10-200 KHz. On-board calculations of least-square fits to the electric field data over one spacecraft spin period (4 s) will provide a baseline of high-quality two-dimensional electric field components that are present in the telemetry stream, except for periods when three or four sensors are in current mode. The spacecraft potential is calculated and transmitted via DWP to other instruments on board. The three components from the search coil instrument (WHISPER) are also available in EFW with a bandwidth of 4 KHz. For more details of the Cluster mission, the spacecraft, and its instruments, see the report Cluster: mission, payload and supporting activities, March 1993, ESA SP-1159, and the included article The Spherical Probe Electric Field and Waves experiment for the Cluster Mission, by G. Gustafsson et al., from which this information was obtained.

23) Cluster II Samba Prime Parameter Spatio-Temporal Analysis of Magnetic Field Fluctuations (STAFF) Data maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VMO/NumericalData/Cluster-Samba/STAFF/PrimeParameter/4S
Start:2000-12-09 00:00:00 Observatory:Cluster FM7 (Samba) Cadence:4 seconds
Stop:2014-04-20 01:01:50 Instrument:Spatio-Temporal Analysis of Magnetic Field Fluctuations (STAFF) Resource:NumericalData
The Spatio-Temporal Analysis of Magnetic Field Fluctuations (STAFF) experiment provides magnetic field power spectral density values parallel and perpendicular to the magnetic field and the electric field power spectral density values for several frequency ranges. For more details of the Cluster mission, the spacecraft, and its instruments, see the report Cluster: mission, payload and supporting activities, March 1993, ESA SP-1159, and the included article The STAFF (Spatio-Temporal Analysis of Field Fluctuations) Experiment for the Cluster Mission, by N. Cornilleau-Wehrlin et al., from which this information was obtained.

24) Cluster 3 Wideband Data Plasma Wave Receiver/High Time Resolution Waveform Data maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VWO/NumericalData/Cluster-Samba/WBD/PT0.0000046S
Start:2001-02-03 05:26:00 Observatory:Cluster FM7 (Samba) Cadence:0.0000046 seconds
Stop:2014-04-20 01:02:21 Instrument:Wide Band Data (WBD) Resource:NumericalData
The following description applies to the Wideband Data (WBD) Plasma Wave Receivers on all four Cluster satellites, each satellite being uniquely identified by its number (1 through 4) or its given name (Rumba, Salsa, Samba, Tango, respectively). High time resolution calibrated waveform data sampled in one of 3 frequency bands in the range 0-577 kHz along one axis using either an electric field antenna or a magnetic search coil sensor. The dataset also includes instrument mode, data quality and the angles required to orient the measurement with respect to the magnetic field and to the GSE coordinate system. The AC electric field data are obtained by using one of the two 88m spin plane electric field antennas of the EFW (Electric Fields and Waves) instrument as a sensor. The AC magnetic field data are obtained by using one of the two search coil magnetometers (one in the spin plane, the other along the spin axis) of the STAFF (Spatio-Temporal Analysis of Field Fluctuations) instrument as a sensor. The WBD data are obtained in one of three filter bandwidth modes: (1) 9.5 kHz, (2) 19 kHz, or (3) 77 kHz. The minimum frequency of each of these three frequency bands can be shifted up (converted) from the default 0 kHz base frequency by 125.454, 250.908 or 501.816 kHz. The time resolution of the data shown in the plots is determined from the WBD instrument mode. The highest time resolution data (generally the 77 kHz bandwidth mode) are sampled at 4.6 microseconds in the time domain (~4.7 milliseconds in the frequency domain using a standard 1024 point FFT). The lowest time resolution data (generally the 9.5 kHz bandwidth mode) are sampled at 36.5 microseconds in the time domain (~37.3 milliseconds in the frequency domain using a standard 1024 point FFT). The availability of these files depends on times of DSN and Panska Ves ground station telemetry downlinks. A list of the status of the WBD instrument on each spacecraft, the telemetry time spans, operating modes and other details are available under Science Data Availability on the University of Iowa Cluster WBD web site at http://www- pw.physics.uiowa.edu/cluster/ and through the documentation section of the Cluster Active Archive (CAA) (http://caa.estec.esa.int/caa). Details on Cluster WBD Interpretation Issues and Caveats can be found at http://www- pw.physics.uiowa.edu/cluster/ by clicking on the links next to the Caution symbol in the listing on the left side of the web site. These documents are also available from the Documentation section of the CAA website. For further details on the Cluster WBD data products see Pickett, J.S., et al., "Cluster Wideband Data Products in the Cluster Active Archive" in _The Cluster Active Archive_, 2010, Springer-Verlag, pp 169-183, and the Cluster WBD User Guide archived at the CAA website in the Documentation section. ... CALIBRATION: ... The procedure used in computing the calibrated Electric Field and Magnetic Field values found in this file can be obtained from the Cluster WBD Calibration Report archived at the CAA website in the Documentation section. Because the calibration was applied in the time domain using simple equations the raw counts actually measured by the WBD instrument can be obtained by using these equations and solving for 'Raw Counts', keeping in mind that this number is an Integer ranging from 0 to 255. Since DC offset is a real number, the resultant when solving for raw counts will need to be converted to the nearest whole number. A sample IDL routine for reverse calibrating to obtain 'Raw Counts' is provided in the WBD Calibration Report archived at the CAA. ... CONVERSION TO FREQUENCY DOMAIN: ... In order to convert the WBD data to the frequency domain via an FFT, the following steps need to be carried out: 1) If Electric Field, first divide calibrated data values by 1000 to get V/m; 2) Apply window of preference, if any (such as Hann, etc.); 3) Divide data values by sqrt(2) to get back to the rms domain; 4) perform FFT (see Bandwidth variable notes for non-continuous modes and/or the WBD User Guide archived at the CAA); 5) divide by the noise bandwidth, which is equal to the sampling frequency divided by the FFT size (see table below for appropriate sampling frequency); 6) multiply by the appropriate constant for the window used, if any. These steps are more fully explained in the WBD Calibration Report archived at the CAA.... +--------------------------+ | Bandwidth | Sample Rate | |-----------|--------------| | 9.5 kHz | 27.443 kHz | | 19 kHz | 54.886 kHz | | 77 kHz | 219.544 kHz | +--------------------------+ COORDINATE SYSTEM USED: ... One axis measurements made in the Antenna Coordinate System, i.e., if electric field measurement, it will either be Ey or Ez, both of which are in the spin plane of the spacecraft, and if magnetic field measurement, it will either be Bx, along the spin axis, or By, in spin plane. The user of WBD data should refer to the WBD User Guide, archived at the CAA, Section 5.4.1 and Figure 5.3 for a description of the three orientation angles provided in these files. Since WBD measurements are made along one axis only, these three angles provide the only means for orienting the WBD measurements with respect to a geocentric coordinate system and to the magnetic field direction ...

25) Cluster 3 WHISPER Natural Electric Power Spectral Density maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VWO/NumericalData/Cluster-Samba/WHISPER/PT2S
Start:2000-08-16 12:39:00 Observatory:Cluster FM7 (Samba) Cadence:2.14 seconds
Stop:2014-04-20 01:02:21 Instrument:Waves of HF and Sounder for Probing Electron Density by Relaxation (WHISPER) Resource:NumericalData
The Waves of HIgh frequency and Sounder for Probing of Electron density by Relaxation (WHISPER) performs the measurement of the electron density on the four satellites of the Cluster project. The two main purposes of the WHISPER experiment are to record the natural waves and to make a diagnostic of the electron density using the sounding technique. The various working modes and the fourier transforms calculated on board provide a good frequency resolution obtained in the bandwidth 2-83 kHz. Onboard data compression by the Digital Wave Processing (DWP) intrument allows a good dynamic and level resolution of the electric signal amplitude.

26) Cluster 3 WHISPER Active Electric Power Spectral Density maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VWO/NumericalData/Cluster-Samba/WHISPER/PT52S
Start:2000-08-16 12:39:00 Observatory:Cluster FM7 (Samba) Cadence:52 seconds
Stop:2014-04-20 01:02:21 Instrument:Waves of HF and Sounder for Probing Electron Density by Relaxation (WHISPER) Resource:NumericalData
The Waves of HIgh frequency and Sounder for Probing of Electron density by Relaxation (WHISPER) performs the measurement of the electron density on the four satellites of the Cluster project. The two main purposes of the WHISPER experiment are to record the natural waves and to make a diagnostic of the electron density using the sounding technique. The various working modes and the fourier transforms calculated on board provide a good frequency resolution obtained in the bandwidth 2-83 kHz. Onboard data compression by the Digital Wave Processing (DWP) intrument allows a good dynamic and level resolution of the electric signal amplitude.

27) Cluster II Samba Prime Parameter Waves of HF and Sounder for Probing Electron Density by Relaxation (WHISPER) Data maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VMO/NumericalData/Cluster-Samba/WHISPER/PrimeParameter/4S
Start:2000-12-10 00:00:00 Observatory:Cluster FM7 (Samba) Cadence:4 seconds
Stop:2014-04-20 01:01:49 Instrument:Waves of HF and Sounder for Probing Electron Density by Relaxation (WHISPER) Resource:NumericalData
The Waves of HF and Sounder for Probing Electron Density by Relaxation (WHISPER) experiment provides measurements of the electron density via active sounding of plasma resonances and records via passive wave analysis the natural wave emissions in the high-frequency range, from 4-80 KHz. For more details of the Cluster mission, the spacecraft, and its instruments, see the report Cluster: mission, payload and supporting activities, March 1993, ESA SP-1159, and the included article WHISPER, a Sounder and High-Frequency Wave Analyser Experiment, by P. M. E. Decreau et al., from which this information was obtained.

28) Cluster II Tango Prime Parameter Active Spacecraft Potential Control (ASPOC) Data maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VMO/NumericalData/Cluster-Tango/ASPOC/PrimeParameter/PT4S
Start:2001-01-30 00:00:00 Observatory:Cluster FM8 (Tango) Cadence:4 seconds
Stop:2014-04-20 01:01:39 Instrument:Active Spacecraft Potential Control (ASPOC) Resource:NumericalData
The ASPOC instrument is a single unit consisting of an electronics box and two cylindrical ion emitter modules. The emitters produce indium ions at approximately 6 KeV, in a current of less than 50 microamps. This is done by field evaporation of indium in the apex field of a needle. In the basic feedback mode of operation, a measurement of the spacecraft potential is supplied to the instrument from either the electric field experiment (EFW) or the electron analyzer (PEACE). This information is then used to adjust the emission current to reduce the spacecraft potential to some predetermined value. By default, priority is given to the EFW data, because of the higher resolution (0.034 V vs. ~1.4 V) and the more straightforward way in which the potential is derived. A calibration mode will measure the current voltage characteristics of the spacecraft, at the beginning of the mission and occasionally later to account for changes in the photoemission properties of the surface. This measurement is carried out by sweeping the ion emission current in incremental steps over some convenient range, allowing simultaneous measurements of the spacecraft potential. The length of each step is 2 to 4 spin periods. In addition to providing an improved environment for other experiments, ASPOC will permit scientific investigations of the photoelectric characteristics of the dependence of the spacecraft potential on plasma parameters, and of spacecraft charging in different plasma environments to be carried out in the so called active mode. For more details of the Cluster mission, the spacecraft, and its instruments, see the report 'Cluster: mission, payload and supporting activities,' March 1993, ESA SP 1159, and the included article 'Active Spacecraft Potential Control: an ion emitter experiment for Cluster,' by W. Riedler et al., from which this information was obtained.

29) Cluster II Tango Prime Parameter Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Data maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VMO/NumericalData/Cluster-Tango/EDI/PrimeParameter/4S
Start:2000-12-09 00:00:00 Observatory:Cluster FM8 (Tango) Cadence:4 seconds
Stop:2014-04-20 01:01:39 Instrument:Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Resource:NumericalData
This instrument (EDI: Electron Drift Instrument) measures the drift of a weak beam of test electrons that, when emitted in certain directions, return to the spacecraft after one gyration. This drift is related to the electric field and the gradient in the magnetic field, and these quantities can, by the use of different electron energies, be determined separately. The fundamental time step to determine the new parameters and direct the beams and the detectors is 2 ms. Inter-experiment links include: magnetic field information from FGM and STAFF, a blanking pulse received from WHISPER to warn of possible interference from that active experiment, and a similar blanking pulse sent to PEACE when the EDI electron beam could interfere with the PEACE electron measurement. For more details of the Cluster mission, the spacecraft, and its instruments, see the report Cluster: mission, payload and supporting activities, March 1993, ESA SP-1159, and the included article The Electron Drift Instrument for Cluster, by G. Paschmann et al., from which this information was obtained.

30) Cluster II Tango Prime Parameter Electric Field and Waves (EFW) Data maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VMO/NumericalData/Cluster-Tango/EFW/PrimeParameter/4S
Start:2000-12-09 00:00:00 Observatory:Cluster FM8 (Tango) Cadence:4 seconds
Stop:2014-04-20 01:01:39 Instrument:Electric Field and Waves (EFW) Resource:NumericalData
The EFW (Electric Field and Waves) instrument consists of four orthogonal spherical sensors deployed from 50 m cable booms in the spin plane of the spacecraft, plus four deployment units and a main electronics unit. Each deployment unit deploys a multiconductor cable and tip-mounted spherical sensor. Each opposing pair of cables will be symmetrically deployed to a tip-to-tip distance of approximately 100 m, except for about a week at the beginning of the mission when 70 m will be used for one boom pair (the Z-booms) and 100 m for the other pair. The potentials of the spherical sensor and nearby conductors are controlled by the microprocessor to minimize errors associated with photoelectron fluxes to and from the spheres. Output signals from the sensor preamplifiers are provided to the wave instruments for analysis of high frequency wave phenomena. There is a 1 MB burst memory and tow fast A/D conversion circuits for recording electric field wave forms for time resolutions of up to 36,000 samples/s. Data gathered in the burst memory will be played back through the telemetry stream allocated to the instrument by pre-empting a portion of the real-time data. Incoming data are continuously monitored by algorithms in the software to determine whether to trigger the burst-playback mode. A large number of sampling modes is possible, yielding four possible telemetry rates from 1.440-29.440 Kbps. This data stream is transferred via the DWP instrument. The main measured quantities will be, in various modes: (1) the instantaneous spin-plane components of the electric field vector, from 0.1-700 V/Km, with time resolution down to 0.1 ms, in four frequency ranges from DC to upper limits of 10 Hz, 180 Hz, 4 KHz, or 32 KHz; (2) the AC electric field components from 10 Hz to 8 KHz, within the dynamic range of ~3 mV/Km to 10 V/Km; (3) plasma density fluctuations within the range of 1-100/cm and in three frequency ranges from 0 Hz to upper limits of 10 Hz, 180 Hz, or 4 KHz; and, (4) density and temperature (in Langmuir sweeps) in the eV range, with a dynamic range of 1-100/cm. There is also a frequency counter covering the range 10-200 KHz. On-board calculations of least-square fits to the electric field data over one spacecraft spin period (4 s) will provide a baseline of high-quality two-dimensional electric field components that are present in the telemetry stream, except for periods when three or four sensors are in current mode. The spacecraft potential is calculated and transmitted via DWP to other instruments on board. The three components from the search coil instrument (WHISPER) are also available in EFW with a bandwidth of 4 KHz. For more details of the Cluster mission, the spacecraft, and its instruments, see the report Cluster: mission, payload and supporting activities, March 1993, ESA SP-1159, and the included article The Spherical Probe Electric Field and Waves experiment for the Cluster Mission, by G. Gustafsson et al., from which this information was obtained.

31) Cluster II Tango Prime Parameter Spatio-Temporal Analysis of Magnetic Field Fluctuations (STAFF) Data maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VMO/NumericalData/Cluster-Tango/STAFF/PrimeParameter/4S
Start:2000-12-09 00:00:00 Observatory:Cluster FM8 (Tango) Cadence:4 seconds
Stop:2014-04-20 01:01:39 Instrument:Spatio-Temporal Analysis of Magnetic Field Fluctuations (STAFF) Resource:NumericalData
The Spatio-Temporal Analysis of Magnetic Field Fluctuations (STAFF) experiment provides magnetic field power spectral density values parallel and perpendicular to the magnetic field and the electric field power spectral density values for several frequency ranges. For more details of the Cluster mission, the spacecraft, and its instruments, see the report Cluster: mission, payload and supporting activities, March 1993, ESA SP-1159, and the included article The STAFF (Spatio-Temporal Analysis of Field Fluctuations) Experiment for the Cluster Mission, by N. Cornilleau-Wehrlin et al., from which this information was obtained.

32) Cluster 4 Wideband Data Plasma Wave Receiver/High Time Resolution Waveform Data maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VWO/NumericalData/Cluster-Tango/WBD/PT0.0000046S
Start:2001-02-03 05:26:00 Observatory:Cluster FM8 (Tango) Cadence:0.0000046 seconds
Stop:2014-04-20 01:02:21 Instrument:Wide Band Data (WBD) Resource:NumericalData
The following description applies to the Wideband Data (WBD) Plasma Wave Receivers on all four Cluster satellites, each satellite being uniquely identified by its number (1 through 4) or its given name (Rumba, Salsa, Samba, Tango, respectively). High time resolution calibrated waveform data sampled in one of 3 frequency bands in the range 0-577 kHz along one axis using either an electric field antenna or a magnetic search coil sensor. The dataset also includes instrument mode, data quality and the angles required to orient the measurement with respect to the magnetic field and to the GSE coordinate system. The AC electric field data are obtained by using one of the two 88m spin plane electric field antennas of the EFW (Electric Fields and Waves) instrument as a sensor. The AC magnetic field data are obtained by using one of the two search coil magnetometers (one in the spin plane, the other along the spin axis) of the STAFF (Spatio-Temporal Analysis of Field Fluctuations) instrument as a sensor. The WBD data are obtained in one of three filter bandwidth modes: (1) 9.5 kHz, (2) 19 kHz, or (3) 77 kHz. The minimum frequency of each of these three frequency bands can be shifted up (converted) from the default 0 kHz base frequency by 125.454, 250.908 or 501.816 kHz. The time resolution of the data shown in the plots is determined from the WBD instrument mode. The highest time resolution data (generally the 77 kHz bandwidth mode) are sampled at 4.6 microseconds in the time domain (~4.7 milliseconds in the frequency domain using a standard 1024 point FFT). The lowest time resolution data (generally the 9.5 kHz bandwidth mode) are sampled at 36.5 microseconds in the time domain (~37.3 milliseconds in the frequency domain using a standard 1024 point FFT). The availability of these files depends on times of DSN and Panska Ves ground station telemetry downlinks. A list of the status of the WBD instrument on each spacecraft, the telemetry time spans, operating modes and other details are available under Science Data Availability on the University of Iowa Cluster WBD web site at http://www- pw.physics.uiowa.edu/cluster/ and through the documentation section of the Cluster Active Archive (CAA) (http://caa.estec.esa.int/caa). Details on Cluster WBD Interpretation Issues and Caveats can be found at http://www- pw.physics.uiowa.edu/cluster/ by clicking on the links next to the Caution symbol in the listing on the left side of the web site. These documents are also available from the Documentation section of the CAA website. For further details on the Cluster WBD data products see Pickett, J.S., et al., "Cluster Wideband Data Products in the Cluster Active Archive" in _The Cluster Active Archive_, 2010, Springer-Verlag, pp 169-183, and the Cluster WBD User Guide archived at the CAA website in the Documentation section. ... CALIBRATION: ... The procedure used in computing the calibrated Electric Field and Magnetic Field values found in this file can be obtained from the Cluster WBD Calibration Report archived at the CAA website in the Documentation section. Because the calibration was applied in the time domain using simple equations the raw counts actually measured by the WBD instrument can be obtained by using these equations and solving for 'Raw Counts', keeping in mind that this number is an Integer ranging from 0 to 255. Since DC offset is a real number, the resultant when solving for raw counts will need to be converted to the nearest whole number. A sample IDL routine for reverse calibrating to obtain 'Raw Counts' is provided in the WBD Calibration Report archived at the CAA. ... CONVERSION TO FREQUENCY DOMAIN: ... In order to convert the WBD data to the frequency domain via an FFT, the following steps need to be carried out: 1) If Electric Field, first divide calibrated data values by 1000 to get V/m; 2) Apply window of preference, if any (such as Hann, etc.); 3) Divide data values by sqrt(2) to get back to the rms domain; 4) perform FFT (see Bandwidth variable notes for non-continuous modes and/or the WBD User Guide archived at the CAA); 5) divide by the noise bandwidth, which is equal to the sampling frequency divided by the FFT size (see table below for appropriate sampling frequency); 6) multiply by the appropriate constant for the window used, if any. These steps are more fully explained in the WBD Calibration Report archived at the CAA.... +--------------------------+ | Bandwidth | Sample Rate | |-----------|--------------| | 9.5 kHz | 27.443 kHz | | 19 kHz | 54.886 kHz | | 77 kHz | 219.544 kHz | +--------------------------+ COORDINATE SYSTEM USED: ... One axis measurements made in the Antenna Coordinate System, i.e., if electric field measurement, it will either be Ey or Ez, both of which are in the spin plane of the spacecraft, and if magnetic field measurement, it will either be Bx, along the spin axis, or By, in spin plane. The user of WBD data should refer to the WBD User Guide, archived at the CAA, Section 5.4.1 and Figure 5.3 for a description of the three orientation angles provided in these files. Since WBD measurements are made along one axis only, these three angles provide the only means for orienting the WBD measurements with respect to a geocentric coordinate system and to the magnetic field direction ...

33) Cluster 4 WHISPER Natural Electric Power Spectral Density maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VWO/NumericalData/Cluster-Tango/WHISPER/PT2S
Start:2000-08-16 12:39:00 Observatory:Cluster FM8 (Tango) Cadence:2.14 seconds
Stop:2014-04-20 01:02:21 Instrument:Waves of HF and Sounder for Probing Electron Density by Relaxation (WHISPER) Resource:NumericalData
The Waves of HIgh frequency and Sounder for Probing of Electron density by Relaxation (WHISPER) performs the measurement of the electron density on the four satellites of the Cluster project. The two main purposes of the WHISPER experiment are to record the natural waves and to make a diagnostic of the electron density using the sounding technique. The various working modes and the fourier transforms calculated on board provide a good frequency resolution obtained in the bandwidth 2-83 kHz. Onboard data compression by the Digital Wave Processing (DWP) intrument allows a good dynamic and level resolution of the electric signal amplitude.

34) Cluster 4 WHISPER Active Electric Power Spectral Density maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VWO/NumericalData/Cluster-Tango/WHISPER/PT52S
Start:2000-08-16 12:39:00 Observatory:Cluster FM8 (Tango) Cadence:52 seconds
Stop:2014-04-20 01:02:21 Instrument:Waves of HF and Sounder for Probing Electron Density by Relaxation (WHISPER) Resource:NumericalData
The Waves of HIgh frequency and Sounder for Probing of Electron density by Relaxation (WHISPER) performs the measurement of the electron density on the four satellites of the Cluster project. The two main purposes of the WHISPER experiment are to record the natural waves and to make a diagnostic of the electron density using the sounding technique. The various working modes and the fourier transforms calculated on board provide a good frequency resolution obtained in the bandwidth 2-83 kHz. Onboard data compression by the Digital Wave Processing (DWP) intrument allows a good dynamic and level resolution of the electric signal amplitude.

35) Cluster II Tango Prime Parameter Waves of HF and Sounder for Probing Electron Density by Relaxation (WHISPER) Data maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VMO/NumericalData/Cluster-Tango/WHISPER/PrimeParameter/4S
Start:2000-12-10 00:00:00 Observatory:Cluster FM8 (Tango) Cadence:4 seconds
Stop:2014-04-20 01:01:39 Instrument:Waves of HF and Sounder for Probing Electron Density by Relaxation (WHISPER) Resource:NumericalData
The Waves of HF and Sounder for Probing Electron Density by Relaxation (WHISPER) experiment provides measurements of the electron density via active sounding of plasma resonances and records via passive wave analysis the natural wave emissions in the high-frequency range, from 4-80 KHz. For more details of the Cluster mission, the spacecraft, and its instruments, see the report Cluster: mission, payload and supporting activities, March 1993, ESA SP-1159, and the included article WHISPER, a Sounder and High-Frequency Wave Analyser Experiment, by P. M. E. Decreau et al., from which this information was obtained.

36) Cluster II Summary Parameter Active Spacecraft Potential Control (ASPOC) Data maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VMO/NumericalData/Cluster/ASPOC/SummaryParameter/PT1M
Start:2001-01-30 00:00:00 Observatory:Cluster FM5 (Rumba) Cadence:1 minute
Stop:2014-04-20 01:01:14 Instrument:Active Spacecraft Potential Control (ASPOC) Resource:NumericalData
The ASPOC instrument is a single unit consisting of an electronics box and two cylindrical ion emitter modules. The emitters produce indium ions at approximately 6 KeV, in a current of less than 50 microamps. This is done by field evaporation of indium in the apex field of a needle. In the basic feedback mode of operation, a measurement of the spacecraft potential is supplied to the instrument from either the electric field experiment (EFW) or the electron analyzer (PEACE). This information is then used to adjust the emission current to reduce the spacecraft potential to some predetermined value. By default, priority is given to the EFW data, because of the higher resolution (0.034 V vs. ~1.4 V) and the more straightforward way in which the potential is derived. A calibration mode will measure the current voltage characteristics of the spacecraft, at the beginning of the mission and occasionally later to account for changes in the photoemission properties of the surface. This measurement is carried out by sweeping the ion emission current in incremental steps over some convenient range, allowing simultaneous measurements of the spacecraft potential. The length of each step is 2 to 4 spin periods. In addition to providing an improved environment for other experiments, ASPOC will permit scientific investigations of the photoelectric characteristics of the dependence of the spacecraft potential on plasma parameters, and of spacecraft charging in different plasma environments to be carried out in the so called active mode. For more details of the Cluster mission, the spacecraft, and its instruments, see the report 'Cluster: mission, payload and supporting activities,' March 1993, ESA SP 1159, and the included article 'Active Spacecraft Potential Control: an ion emitter experiment for Cluster,' by W. Riedler et al., from which this information was obtained.

37) Cluster II Summary Parameter Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Data maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VMO/NumericalData/Cluster/EDI/SummaryParameter/60S
Start:2001-02-01 00:00:00 Observatory:Cluster FM5 (Rumba) Cadence:60 seconds
Stop:2014-04-20 01:01:14 Instrument:Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Resource:NumericalData
This instrument (EDI: Electron Drift Instrument) measures the drift of a weak beam of test electrons that, when emitted in certain directions, return to the spacecraft after one gyration. This drift is related to the electric field and the gradient in the magnetic field, and these quantities can, by the use of different electron energies, be determined separately. The fundamental time step to determine the new parameters and direct the beams and the detectors is 2 ms. Inter-experiment links include: magnetic field information from FGM and STAFF, a blanking pulse received from WHISPER to warn of possible interference from that active experiment, and a similar blanking pulse sent to PEACE when the EDI electron beam could interfere with the PEACE electron measurement. For more details of the Cluster mission, the spacecraft, and its instruments, see the report Cluster: mission, payload and supporting activities, March 1993, ESA SP-1159, and the included article The Electron Drift Instrument for Cluster, by G. Paschmann et al., from which this information was obtained.

38) Cluster II Summary Parameter Electric Field and Waves (EFW) Data maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VMO/NumericalData/Cluster/EFW/SummaryParameter/60S
Start:2001-01-01 00:00:00 Observatory:Cluster FM5 (Rumba) Cadence:60 seconds
Stop:2014-04-20 01:01:13 Instrument:Electric Field and Waves (EFW) Resource:NumericalData
The EFW (Electric Field and Waves) instrument consists of four orthogonal spherical sensors deployed from 50 m cable booms in the spin plane of the spacecraft, plus four deployment units and a main electronics unit. Each deployment unit deploys a multiconductor cable and tip-mounted spherical sensor. Each opposing pair of cables will be symmetrically deployed to a tip-to-tip distance of approximately 100 m, except for about a week at the beginning of the mission when 70 m will be used for one boom pair (the Z-booms) and 100 m for the other pair. The potentials of the spherical sensor and nearby conductors are controlled by the microprocessor to minimize errors associated with photoelectron fluxes to and from the spheres. Output signals from the sensor preamplifiers are provided to the wave instruments for analysis of high frequency wave phenomena. There is a 1 MB burst memory and tow fast A/D conversion circuits for recording electric field wave forms for time resolutions of up to 36,000 samples/s. Data gathered in the burst memory will be played back through the telemetry stream allocated to the instrument by pre-empting a portion of the real-time data. Incoming data are continuously monitored by algorithms in the software to determine whether to trigger the burst-playback mode. A large number of sampling modes is possible, yielding four possible telemetry rates from 1.440-29.440 Kbps. This data stream is transferred via the DWP instrument. The main measured quantities will be, in various modes: (1) the instantaneous spin-plane components of the electric field vector, from 0.1-700 V/Km, with time resolution down to 0.1 ms, in four frequency ranges from DC to upper limits of 10 Hz, 180 Hz, 4 KHz, or 32 KHz; (2) the AC electric field components from 10 Hz to 8 KHz, within the dynamic range of ~3 mV/Km to 10 V/Km; (3) plasma density fluctuations within the range of 1-100/cm and in three frequency ranges from 0 Hz to upper limits of 10 Hz, 180 Hz, or 4 KHz; and, (4) density and temperature (in Langmuir sweeps) in the eV range, with a dynamic range of 1-100/cm. There is also a frequency counter covering the range 10-200 KHz. On-board calculations of least-square fits to the electric field data over one spacecraft spin period (4 s) will provide a baseline of high-quality two-dimensional electric field components that are present in the telemetry stream, except for periods when three or four sensors are in current mode. The spacecraft potential is calculated and transmitted via DWP to other instruments on board. The three components from the search coil instrument (WHISPER) are also available in EFW with a bandwidth of 4 KHz. For more details of the Cluster mission, the spacecraft, and its instruments, see the report Cluster: mission, payload and supporting activities, March 1993, ESA SP-1159, and the included article The Spherical Probe Electric Field and Waves experiment for the Cluster Mission, by G. Gustafsson et al., from which this information was obtained.

39) Cluster II Summary Parameter Spatio-Temporal Analysis of Magnetic Field Fluctuations (STAFF) Data maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VMO/NumericalData/Cluster/STAFF/SummaryParameter/60S
Start:2001-01-09 00:00:00 Observatory:Cluster FM5 (Rumba) Cadence:60 seconds
Stop:2014-04-20 01:01:14 Instrument:Spatio-Temporal Analysis of Magnetic Field Fluctuations (STAFF) Resource:NumericalData
The Spatio-Temporal Analysis of Magnetic Field Fluctuations (STAFF) experiment provides magnetic field power spectral density values parallel and perpendicular to the magnetic field and the electric field power spectral density values for several frequency ranges. For more details of the Cluster mission, the spacecraft, and its instruments, see the report Cluster: mission, payload and supporting activities, March 1993, ESA SP-1159, and the included article The STAFF (Spatio-Temporal Analysis of Field Fluctuations) Experiment for the Cluster Mission, by N. Cornilleau-Wehrlin et al., from which this information was obtained.

40) Cluster II Summary Parameter Waves of HF and Sounder for Probing Electron Density by Relaxation (WHISPER) Data maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VMO/NumericalData/Cluster/WHISPER/SummaryParameter/60S
Start:2001-01-09 00:00:00 Observatory:Cluster FM5 (Rumba) Cadence:60 seconds
Stop:2014-04-20 01:01:13 Instrument:Waves of HF and Sounder for Probing Electron Density by Relaxation (WHISPER) Resource:NumericalData
The Waves of HF and Sounder for Probing Electron Density by Relaxation (WHISPER) experiment provides measurements of the electron density via active sounding of plasma resonances and records via passive wave analysis the natural wave emissions in the high-frequency range, from 4-80 KHz. For more details of the Cluster mission, the spacecraft, and its instruments, see the report Cluster: mission, payload and supporting activities, March 1993, ESA SP-1159, and the included article WHISPER, a Sounder and High-Frequency Wave Analyser Experiment, by P. M. E. Decreau et al., from which this information was obtained.

41) Dynamics Explorer 2 Combined Magnetic Field Vector Electric Field Data DC maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VMO/NumericalData/DE2/BVEFI/DC/PT0.5S
Start:1981-10-04 16:00:00 Observatory:Dynamics Explorer 2 Cadence:1 second
Stop:1981-02-19 00:00:00 Instrument:Vector Electric Field Instrument (VEFI) Resource:NumericalData
Dynamics Explorer 2 Magnetic Field and Vector Electric Field Instrument DC Data

42) Dynamics Explorer 2 Combined Magnetic Field Vector Electric Field Data Matrix maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VMO/NumericalData/DE2/BVEFI/MATRIX/PT0.5S
Start:1981-10-04 16:00:00 Observatory:Dynamics Explorer 2 Cadence:1 second
Stop:1981-02-19 00:00:00 Instrument:Vector Electric Field Instrument (VEFI) Resource:NumericalData
Dynamics Explorer 2 Magnetic Field and Vector Electric Field Instrument DC Matrix

43) Dynamics Explorer 2 Vector Electric Field Instrument (VEFI) DCA maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VMO/NumericalData/DE2/VEFI/DCA/PT0.5S
Start:1981-08-10 16:00:00 Observatory:Dynamics Explorer 2 Cadence:0.5 seconds
Stop:1981-02-19 00:00:00 Instrument:Vector Electric Field Instrument (VEFI) Resource:NumericalData
Dynamics Explorer 2 Vector Electric Field Instrument DCA Data

44) FAST AC Fields, ~5 sec resolution maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VWO/NumericalData/FAST/ACF/PT5S
Start:1996-08-30 02:02:17 Observatory:FAST Cadence:5 seconds
Stop:2002-10-25 00:11:32 Instrument:Electric Field and Langmuir Probe Experiment Resource:NumericalData
FAST AC Fields Key Parameter CDF files consists of AC Electric and Magnetic fields measurements spanning a range from approximately 32 Hz to 2 MHz. The time range of each file is roughly 24 hours and consists of several passes over the auroral zone of approximately 20 minute duration, the time resolution is one spin period (approximately 5s). The orbital period of FAST is 133 minutes.

45) Galileo PWS Earth Flyby Daily Dynamic Spectrograms Electric maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VWO/DisplayData/Galileo/PWS/DS.Electric.P1D
Start:1990-11-08 17:00:00 Observatory: Cadence:
Stop:1992-12-17 06:30:00 Instrument: Resource:DisplayData
These PWS daily spectrograms cover the time range around the time of the Galileo spacecraft's two Earth flybys on its way to Jupiter. This dataset contains electric field spectrograms in units of electric field spectral density (V^2/m^2/Hz) spanning 6 Hz to 5.6 MHz. An associated dataset contains magnetic field spectrograms in units of magnetic field spectral density (nT^2/Hz) spanning 6 Hz to 75 kHz. The sources of this browse data set are the High Frequency Receiver, Sweep Frequency Receiver, and Spectrum Analyzer which make up the Low Rate Science portion of the PWS. The high frequency receiver data that appears in the uppermost panel of the spectrograms are only taken from the electric field antennas. During the time interval spanned by the first Earth flyby, Galileo approached Earth from the local early morning sector, made a close approach to Earth by passing through the magnetosphere, plasmasphere, ionosphere, and finally exited the Earth system in the local late morning. During the time interval spanned by the second Earth flyby, Galileo approached Earth from the local late evening sector, made a close approach to Earth by passing through the magnetosphere, plasmasphere, ionosphere, and finally exited the Earth system near local dawn. +-----------------------------------------------------+ | Flyby 1 | | 1990 November 8 1700 UT | - dataset start | | 1990 December 8 | - Earth closest approach | | 1990 December 18 1700 UT | - dataset end | +-----------------------------------------------------+ +-----------------------------------------------------+ | Flyby 2 | | 1992 November 6 2100 UT | - dataset start | | 1992 December 8 | - Earth closest approach | | 1992 December 17 0630 UT | - dataset ends | +-----------------------------------------------------+

46) Galileo PWS Summary Electric Field Dataset maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VWO/NumericalData/Galileo/PWS/Summary.Electric
Start:1995-12-07 15:21:00 Observatory: Cadence:60 seconds
Stop:2003-09-21 18:45:00 Instrument: Resource:NumericalData
This data set includes 1-minute averages of the electric and magnetic wave spectra obtained during the period that the Galileo plasma wave receiver was operated during the Jupiter orbital mission (prime, GEM and GMM). The parameter provided for the electric field spectrum is the electric field spectral density in units of V**2/m**2/Hz. The magnetic field spectrum is provided in units of magnetic field spectral density, nT**2/Hz. The spectral information is averaged and binned into 49 logarithmically-spaced channels from about 6 Hz to 5.6 MHz for the electric measurements and 34 channels from about 6 Hz to 75 kHz for the magnetic. Note that these 'channels' do not generally correspond to the 158 specific channels described in the instrument description document. The reduction in spectral resolution for this data set was performed in order to make the set more conducive to use as a browse data set. The sources of this browse data set are the High Frequency Receiver, Sweep Frequency Receiver, and Spectrum Analyzer which make up the Low Rate Science portion of the PWS.

47) Geotail PWI 24 hour dynamic spectrograms maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VWO/DisplayData/Geotail/PWI/DS.P1D
Start:1992-09-18 00:00:00 Observatory:Geotail Cadence:
Stop:2014-04-20 01:02:19 Instrument:Geotail Plasma Wave Investigation (PWI) Resource:DisplayData
Geotail PWI SFA and MCA dynamic spectrogram plots with frequency in Hz on the vertical axis and time in UT on the horizontal axis. Each file contains one spectrogram from the electric field antennas and one from the magnetic field search coils. The electric field spectrograms span the frequency range 5.62 to 24 Hz (the Multi-Channel Analyzer - MCA instrument) and 24 Hz to 800 kHz (the Sweep Frequency Analyzer - SFA instrument). The intensity values are color coded and are expressed in units of dBV/m/root-Hz. The magnetic field spectrograms also combine the MCA and SFA instruments and span the frequency range 5.62 Hz to 12.5 kHz. The intensity values are color coded and are expressed in units of dB nT/root-Hz. Each plot spans 24 hours. Beneath the time axis of the magnetic field spectrogram are spacecraft GSM coordinates for every 4 hours. Information on the instrument and antenna status is also provided above each spectrogram.

48) Geotail PWI 2 hour dynamic spectrograms maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VWO/DisplayData/Geotail/PWI/DS.PT2H
Start:1992-09-18 00:00:00 Observatory:Geotail Cadence:
Stop:2014-04-20 01:02:19 Instrument:Geotail Plasma Wave Investigation (PWI) Resource:DisplayData
Geotail PWI SFA and MCA dynamic spectrogram plots with frequency in Hz on the vertical axis and time in UT on the horizontal axis. Each file contains one spectrogram from the electric field antennas and one from the magnetic field search coils. The electric field spectrograms span the frequency range 5.62 to 24 Hz (the Multi-Channel Analyzer - MCA instrument) and 24 Hz to 800 kHz (the Sweep Frequency Analyzer - SFA instrument). The intensity values are color coded and are expressed in units of dBV/m/root-Hz. The magnetic field spectrograms also combine the MCA and SFA instruments and span the frequency range 5.62 Hz to 12.5 kHz. The intensity values are color coded and are expressed in units of dB nT/root-Hz. Each plot spans 2 hours. Information on the instrument and antenna status is also provided above each spectrogram.

49) RPI Daily Dynamic Spectrogram Plot maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VWO/DisplayData/IMAGE/RPI/DS.P1D
Start:2000-04-21 20:24:42 Observatory:IMAGE Cadence:5 minutes
Stop:2005-12-18 07:50:00 Instrument:Radio Plasma Imager (RPI) Resource:DisplayData
Collection of RPI Daily Dynamic Spectrogram plots at NASA GSFC, covering complete mission period from 2000-04-21 to 2005-12-18. Dynamic Spectrograms present the time history of natural radio emissions in space between 3 and 1009 kHz while the IMAGE spacecraft orbits the Earth. This operating frequency range was selected by the RPI team to provide an optimal temporal resolution to the wave observations. Each image is a daily plot of the voltage spectral density of received signal (color scale) as function of operating frequency (vertical axis) and time (horizontal axis). Commonly used in the analysis of noise generators, spectral density is a frequency-dependent characteristic that describes how much power is generated by the emission source in a 1 Hz bandwidth. RPI Dynamic Spectograms plot a Voltage Spectral Density, which is root of power spectral density, measured in [V/root-Hz] units. Note that conversion of antenna voltage to electric field strength depends on effective length of receive antennas, and such conversion is not performed here. RPI is capable of detecting input radio emissions above its noise floor of 5 nV/root-Hz, which is determined by the internal white noise of the RPI antenna pre-amplifiers.

50) RPI Dynamic Spectrogram data in CDF at NASA CDAWeb maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VWO/NumericalData/IMAGE/RPI/DS.PT5M
Start:2000-04-21 20:24:42 Observatory:IMAGE Cadence:5 minutes
Stop:2005-12-18 07:50:00 Instrument:Radio Plasma Imager (RPI) Resource:NumericalData
RPI passive wave measurement capturing voltage spectral density of the radio emissions in space as a function of frequency, typically between 3 and 1009 kHz. This operating frequency range was selected by the RPI team to provide optimal temporal resolution of the wave observations. Commonly used in the analysis of noise generators, spectral density is a frequency-dependent characteristic that describes how much power is generated by the emission source in a 1 Hz bandwidth. The original description of emissions was done in terms of thermal noise measurements, though the same approach also applies to non-thermal emissions such as AKR. CDF_DS_PT5M stores calibrated data from all three RPI antennas X, Y, and Z individually and a combined X+Y antenna channel. The data are presented as the Voltage Spectral Density (VSD), which is the root of power spectral density, measured in [V/root-Hz] units. Note that conversion of antenna voltage to electric field strength depends on the effective length of the receive antenna, and such conversion is not performed here. (See spase://SMWG/Instrument/IMAGE/RPI for a time history of the lengths of the three mutually orthogonal RPI dipole antennas.) RPI is capable of detecting input radio emissions above its noise floor of 5 nV/root-Hz, which is determined by the internal white noise of the RPI antenna pre-amplifiers. The VSD in RPI spectrogram data is presented in dB relative to 1 V/root-Hz (logarithmic scale), units of dB(V/root-Hz). The RPI instrument noise floor is 5 nV/root-Hz = -166 dB(V/root-Hz) at the receiver input. Software suggested by the science team for CDF file visualization: (1) Plotting tool at the CDAWeb portal, (2) For analysis beyond static image inspection, including color scale optimization, zooming, text export, alternative data representations in physical units, detailed frequency and time information, overlaid model fpe and fce graphs, and EPS quality figures, use BinBrowser software at UML, http://ulcar.uml.edu/rpi.html

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