Search results 53 matches in 0.001 seconds
Showing 1 - 50Next

1) MMS 4 Active Spacecraft Potential Control, Sensors 1 and 2 (ASPOC) Level 2, Quick-Look Survey maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VSPO/NumericalData/MMS/4/ASPOC/Survey/Level2/PT1S
Start:2015-04-19 00:00:00 Observatory:MMS-4 Cadence:1 second
Stop:2016-09-14 07:59:58 Instrument:MMS 4 Active Spacecraft Potential Control (ASPOC) Instrument Resource:NumericalData
MMS 4 Active Spacecraft Potential Control (ASPOC) - Sensors 1 and 2 Ion Beam Current Rates, Beam Energies, and Instrument Status variables. In tenuous plasma regions, the floating potential of a sunlit spacecraft is positively charged, reaching up to tens of Volts. The corresponding electric field disturbs the ambient plasma measurements obtained from electron and ion sensors and the large fluxes of attracted photo-electrons can significantly reduce the lifetime of the micro-channel plate. The electric field measurements can be also contaminated by the high spacecraft potential values. The Active Spacecraft Potential Control neutralizes the spacecraft potential by releasing positively charged Indium ions. The ASPOCs neutralize the electrical potential of the spacecraft, limiting or eliminating spurious electric fields that can contaminate measurements. This allows observations of the more scientifically important low-energy ions and electrons.

2) MMS 4 Energetic Particle Detector, Energetic Ion Spectrometer (EPD-EIS) Energy by Time of Flight, Level 2, Burst Survey maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VSPO/NumericalData/MMS/4/EnergeticParticleDetector/EIS/Burst/Level2/EnergyByTimeOfFlight/PT0.605S
Start:2015-09-01 12:11:14 Observatory:MMS-4 Cadence:0.605 seconds
Stop:2016-09-14 08:00:00 Instrument:MMS 4 Energetic Particle Detector (EPD) Suite, Energetic Ion Spectrometer (EIS) Instrument Resource:NumericalData
Energetic Particle Detector (EPD), Energetic Ion Spectrometer (EIS) Energy by Time of Flight, Level 2, Burst Survey, 0.605 s Data. The EIS provides ion composition measurements (protons versus oxygen ions) and angular distributions over the energy range from approximately 45 to 500 keV.

3) MMS 4 Energetic Particle Detector, Energetic Ion Spectrometer (EPD-EIS) Pulse Height by Time of Flight, Level 2, Burst Survey maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VSPO/NumericalData/MMS/4/EnergeticParticleDetector/EIS/Burst/Level2/PulseHeightByTimeOfFlight/PT0.605S
Start:2015-09-01 12:11:14 Observatory:MMS-4 Cadence:0.605 seconds
Stop:2016-09-14 08:00:00 Instrument:MMS 4 Energetic Particle Detector (EPD) Suite, Energetic Ion Spectrometer (EIS) Instrument Resource:NumericalData
Energetic Particle Detector (EPD), Energetic Ion Spectrometer (EIS) Pulse Height by Time of Flight, Level 2, Burst Survey, 0.605 s Data. The EIS provides ion composition measurements (protons versus oxygen ions) and angular distributions over the energy range from approximately 45 to 500 keV.

4) MMS 4 Energetic Particle Detector, Energetic Ion Spectrometer (EPD-EIS) Electron Energy Spectra, Level 2, Quick-Look Survey maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VSPO/NumericalData/MMS/4/EnergeticParticleDetector/EIS/Survey/Level2/ElectronEnergySpectra/PT2.42S
Start:2015-09-01 00:00:00 Observatory:MMS-4 Cadence:2.42 seconds
Stop:2016-09-14 07:59:59 Instrument:MMS 4 Energetic Particle Detector (EPD) Suite, Energetic Ion Spectrometer (EIS) Instrument Resource:NumericalData
Energetic Particle Detector (EPD), Energetic Ion Spectrometer (EIS) Electron Energy Spectra, Level 2, Quick-Look Survey, 2.42 s Data. The EIS provides ion composition measurements (protons versus oxygen ions) and angular distributions over the energy range from approximately 45 to 500 keV.

5) MMS 4 Energetic Particle Detector, Energetic Ion Spectrometer (EPD-EIS) Energy by Time of Flight, Level 2, Quick-Look Survey maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VSPO/NumericalData/MMS/4/EnergeticParticleDetector/EIS/Survey/Level2/EnergyByTimeOfFlight/PT2.42S
Start:2015-09-01 00:00:00 Observatory:MMS-4 Cadence:2.42 seconds
Stop:2016-09-14 07:59:59 Instrument:MMS 4 Energetic Particle Detector (EPD) Suite, Energetic Ion Spectrometer (EIS) Instrument Resource:NumericalData
Energetic Particle Detector (EPD), Energetic Ion Spectrometer (EIS) Energy by Time of Flight, Level 2, Quick-Look Survey, 2.42 s Data. The EIS provides ion composition measurements (protons versus oxygen ions) and angular distributions over the energy range from approximately 45 to 500 keV.

6) MMS 4 Energetic Particle Detector, Energetic Ion Spectrometer (EPD-EIS) Pulse Height by Time of Flight, Level 2, Quick-Look Survey maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VSPO/NumericalData/MMS/4/EnergeticParticleDetector/EIS/Survey/Level2/PulseHeightByTimeOfFlight/PT2.42S
Start:2015-09-01 00:00:00 Observatory:MMS-4 Cadence:2.42 seconds
Stop:2016-09-14 07:59:59 Instrument:MMS 4 Energetic Particle Detector (EPD) Suite, Energetic Ion Spectrometer (EIS) Instrument Resource:NumericalData
Energetic Particle Detector (EPD), Energetic Ion Spectrometer (EPD EIS) Pulse Height by Time of Flight, Level 2, Quick-Look Survey, 2.42 s Data. The EIS provides ion composition measurements (protons versus oxygen ions) and angular distributions over the energy range from approximately 45 to 500 keV.

7) MMS 4 Electric Particle Detector, Fly's Eye Energetic Particle Sensor (EPD, FEEPS) Electrons, Burst Survey maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VSPO/NumericalData/MMS/4/EnergeticParticleDetector/FEEPS/Burst/Level2/Electron/PT0.3025S
Start:2015-09-02 16:48:44 Observatory:MMS-4 Cadence:0.3025 seconds
Stop:2016-09-14 08:00:00 Instrument:MMS 4 Energetic Particle Detector (EPD) Suite, Fly's Eye Energetic Particle Sensor (FEEPS) Instrument Resource:NumericalData
Fly's Eye Electron Proton Spectrometer (FEEPS) Burst Data. The Energetic Particle Detector (EPD) investigation aboard the four MMS spacecraft consists of two instrument designs, the FEEPS and the EIS (Energetic Ion Spectrometer). A FEEPS consists of six Heads, each composed of two Eyes. Each eye is a particle telescope with a single silicon detector. There are nine electron eyes and three ion eyes per FEEPS. The energy coverage is from 25 keV to 650 keV for electrons and 45 keV to 650 keV for ions. Each eye has sixteen energy channels, the spacing of which can be modified by command. The fields of view and pointing of each eye are designed to provide a broad, instantaneous field of view for the twelve eyes per FEEPS.

8) MMS 4 Electric Particle Detector, Fly's Eye Energetic Particle Sensor (EPD, FEEPS) Ions, Burst Survey maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VSPO/NumericalData/MMS/4/EnergeticParticleDetector/FEEPS/Burst/Level2/Ion/PT0.3025S
Start:2015-09-02 16:48:44 Observatory:MMS-4 Cadence:0.3025 seconds
Stop:2016-09-14 08:00:00 Instrument:MMS 4 Energetic Particle Detector (EPD) Suite, Fly's Eye Energetic Particle Sensor (FEEPS) Instrument Resource:NumericalData
Fly's Eye Electron Proton Spectrometer (FEEPS) Burst Data. The Energetic Particle Detector (EPD) investigation aboard the four MMS spacecraft consists of two instrument designs, the FEEPS and the EIS (Energetic Ion Spectrometer). A FEEPS consists of six Heads, each composed of two Eyes. Each eye is a particle telescope with a single silicon detector. There are nine electron eyes and three ion eyes per FEEPS. The energy coverage is from 25 keV to 650 keV for electrons and 45 keV to 650 keV for ions. Each eye has sixteen energy channels, the spacing of which can be modified by command. The fields of view and pointing of each eye are designed to provide a broad, instantaneous field of view for the twelve eyes per FEEPS.

9) MMS 4 Electric Particle Detector, Fly's Eye Energetic Particle Sensor (EPD, FEEPS) Electrons, Quick-Look Survey maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VSPO/NumericalData/MMS/4/EnergeticParticleDetector/FEEPS/Survey/Level2/Electron/PT2.42S
Start:2015-09-01 00:00:00 Observatory:MMS-4 Cadence:2.42 seconds
Stop:2016-09-14 08:00:00 Instrument:MMS 4 Energetic Particle Detector (EPD) Suite, Fly's Eye Energetic Particle Sensor (FEEPS) Instrument Resource:NumericalData
Fly's Eye Electron Proton Spectrometer (FEEPS) Survey Data. The Energetic Particle Detector (EPD) investigation aboard the four MMS spacecraft consists of two instrument designs, the FEEPS and the EIS (Energetic Ion Spectrometer). A FEEPS consists of six Heads, each composed of two Eyes. Each eye is a particle telescope with a single silicon detector. There are nine electron eyes and three ion eyes per FEEPS. The energy coverage is from 25 keV to 650 keV for electrons and 45 keV to 650 keV for ions. Each eye has sixteen energy channels, the spacing of which can be modified by command. The fields of view and pointing of each eye are designed to provide a broad, instantaneous field of view for the twelve eyes per FEEPS.

10) MMS 4 Electric Particle Detector, Fly's Eye Energetic Particle Sensor (EPD, FEEPS) Ions, Quick-Look Survey maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VSPO/NumericalData/MMS/4/EnergeticParticleDetector/FEEPS/Survey/Level2/Ion/PT2.42S
Start:2015-09-01 00:00:00 Observatory:MMS-4 Cadence:2.42 seconds
Stop:2016-09-14 08:00:00 Instrument:MMS 4 Energetic Particle Detector (EPD) Suite, Fly's Eye Energetic Particle Sensor (FEEPS) Instrument Resource:NumericalData
Fly's Eye Electron Proton Spectrometer (FEEPS) Survey Data. The Energetic Particle Detector (EPD) investigation aboard the four MMS spacecraft consists of two instrument designs, the FEEPS and the EIS (Energetic Ion Spectrometer). A FEEPS consists of six Heads, each composed of two Eyes. Each eye is a particle telescope with a single silicon detector. There are nine electron eyes and three ion eyes per FEEPS. The energy coverage is from 25 keV to 650 keV for electrons and 45 keV to 650 keV for ions. Each eye has sixteen energy channels, the spacing of which can be modified by command. The fields of view and pointing of each eye are designed to provide a broad, instantaneous field of view for the twelve eyes per FEEPS.

11) MMS 4 Magnetic Ephemeris and Coordinates (MEC) Magnetic Ephemeris and Support (Tsyganenko 2004 Model, Disturbed Conditions), Burst Survey maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VSPO/NumericalData/MMS/4/Ephemeris/Burst/Level2/Tsyganenko_04_Disturbed/PT0.030S
Start:2016-01-31 00:18:35 Observatory:MMS-4 Cadence:0.030 seconds
Stop:2016-09-14 08:00:01 Instrument:MMS 4 Ephemeris Resource:NumericalData
Magnetospheric Multiscale 4 (MMS 4) spacecraft position, velocity, attitude, angular momentum vector, and magnetic ephemeris and coordinates (MEC), Level-2 science data at Burst (30 ms) time resolution. The Magnetic ephemeris data are calculated by using the Tsyganenko 2004 magnetic field model for disturbed magnetospheric conditions. Many variables are included in this data product including the magnetic field measured at the spacecraft. If possible, the northern and southern hemisphere footpoints of the spacecraft are found by tracing along the magnetic field line threading through the spacecraft per the given Tsyganenko and internal magnetic field models. The northern and southern hemisphere loss cone angles are also given. The magnetic field strength at the footpoints and the minimum magnetic field strength along the field line are also calculated by using the field models. Other variables list the spacecraft L-shell, the magnetic local time, the magnetic latitude and longitude, and whether the threading field line is open, closed, etc. Rotational quaternions are provided to allow coordinate transformation from GEI into 11 other coordinate systems including BSC, GEO, GSE, GSE2000, GSE, and SM. The list of ancillary variables includes the dipole tilt angle, the Dst and Kp actvity indices, and separate flags that denote satellite eclipse by the Earth and Moon.

12) MMS 4 Magnetic Ephemeris and Coordinates (MEC) Magnetic Ephemeris and Support (Tsyganenko 1989 Model, Disturbed Conditions), Burst Survey maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VSPO/NumericalData/MMS/4/Ephemeris/Burst/Level2/Tsyganenko_89_Disturbed/PT0.030S
Start:2016-01-31 00:18:35 Observatory:MMS-4 Cadence:0.030 seconds
Stop:2016-09-14 08:00:01 Instrument:MMS 4 Ephemeris Resource:NumericalData
Magnetospheric Multiscale 4 (MMS 4) spacecraft position, velocity, attitude, angular momentum vector, and magnetic ephemeris and coordinates (MEC), Level-2 science data at Burst (30 ms) time resolution. The Magnetic ephemeris data are calculated by using the Tsyganenko 1989 magnetic field model for disturbed magnetospheric conditions. Many variables are included in this data product including the magnetic field measured at the spacecraft. If possible, the northern and southern hemisphere footpoints of the spacecraft are found by tracing along the magnetic field line threading through the spacecraft per the given Tsyganenko and internal magnetic field models. The northern and southern hemisphere loss cone angles are also given. The magnetic field strength at the footpoints and the minimum magnetic field strength along the field line are also calculated by using the field models. Other variables list the spacecraft L-shell, the magnetic local time, the magnetic latitude and longitude, and whether the threading field line is open, closed, etc. Rotational quaternions are provided to allow coordinate transformation from GEI into 11 other coordinate systems including BSC, GEO, GSE, GSE2000, GSE, and SM. The list of ancillary variables includes the dipole tilt angle, the Dst and Kp actvity indices, and separate flags that denote satellite eclipse by the Earth and Moon.

13) MMS 4 Magnetic Ephemeris and Coordinates (MEC) Magnetic Ephemeris and Support (Tsyganenko 1989 Model, Quiet Conditions), Burst Survey maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VSPO/NumericalData/MMS/4/Ephemeris/Burst/Level2/Tsyganenko_89_Quiet/PT0.030S
Start:2016-01-31 00:18:35 Observatory:MMS-4 Cadence:0.030 seconds
Stop:2016-09-14 08:00:01 Instrument:MMS 4 Ephemeris Resource:NumericalData
Magnetospheric Multiscale 4 (MMS 4) spacecraft position, velocity, attitude, angular momentum vector, and magnetic ephemeris and coordinates (MEC), Level-2 science data at Burst (30 ms) time resolution. The Magnetic ephemeris data are calculated by using the Tsyganenko 1989 magnetic field model for quiet magnetospheric conditions. Many variables are included in this data product including the magnetic field measured at the spacecraft. If possible, the northern and southern hemisphere footpoints of the spacecraft are found by tracing along the magnetic field line threading through the spacecraft per the given Tsyganenko and internal magnetic field models. The northern and southern hemisphere loss cone angles are also given. The magnetic field strength at the footpoints and the minimum magnetic field strength along the field line are also calculated by using the field models. Other variables list the spacecraft L-shell, the magnetic local time, the magnetic latitude and longitude, and whether the threading field line is open, closed, etc. Rotational quaternions are provided to allow coordinate transformation from GEI into 11 other coordinate systems including BSC, GEO, GSE, GSE2000, GSE, and SM. The list of ancillary variables includes the dipole tilt angle, the Dst and Kp actvity indices, and separate flags that denote satellite eclipse by the Earth and Moon.

14) MMS 4 Magnetic Ephemeris and Coordinates (MEC) Magnetic Ephemeris and Support (Tsyganenko 2004 Model, Disturbed Conditions), Quick-Look Survey maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VSPO/NumericalData/MMS/4/Ephemeris/Survey/Level2/Tsyganenko_04_Disturbed/PT30S
Start:2015-03-13 00:00:00 Observatory:MMS-4 Cadence:30 seconds
Stop:2016-09-14 08:00:00 Instrument:MMS 4 Ephemeris Resource:NumericalData
Magnetospheric Multiscale 4 (MMS 4) spacecraft position, velocity, attitude, angular momentum vector, and magnetic ephemeris and coordinates (MEC), Level-2 science data at Quick-Look (30 s) time resolution. The Magnetic ephemeris data are calculated by using the Tsyganenko 2004 magnetic field model for disturbed magnetospheric conditions. Many variables are included in this data product including the magnetic field measured at the spacecraft. If possible, the northern and southern hemisphere footpoints of the spacecraft are found by tracing along the magnetic field line threading through the spacecraft per the given Tsyganenko and internal magnetic field models. The northern and southern hemisphere loss cone angles are also given. The magnetic field strength at the footpoints and the minimum magnetic field strength along the field line are also calculated by using the field models. Other variables list the spacecraft L-shell, the magnetic local time, the magnetic latitude and longitude, and whether the threading field line is open, closed, etc. Rotational quaternions are provided to allow coordinate transformation from GEI into 6 other coordinate systems including BSC, GEO, GSE, GSE2000, GSE, and SM. The list of ancillary variables includes the dipole tilt angle, the Dst and Kp actvity indices, and separate flags that denote satellite eclipse by the Earth and Moon.

15) MMS 4 Magnetic Ephemeris and Coordinates (MEC) Magnetic Ephemeris and Support (Tsyganenko 1989 Model, Disturbed Conditions), Quick-Look Survey maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VSPO/NumericalData/MMS/4/Ephemeris/Survey/Level2/Tsyganenko_89_Disturbed/PT30S
Start:2015-03-13 00:00:00 Observatory:MMS-4 Cadence:30 seconds
Stop:2016-09-14 08:00:00 Instrument:MMS 4 Ephemeris Resource:NumericalData
Magnetospheric Multiscale 4 (MMS 4) spacecraft position, velocity, attitude, angular momentum vector, and magnetic ephemeris and coordinates (MEC), Level-2 science data at Quick-Look (30 s) time resolution. The Magnetic ephemeris data are calculated by using the Tsyganenko 1989 magnetic field model for disturbed magnetospheric conditions. Many variables are included in this data product including the magnetic field measured at the spacecraft. If possible, the northern and southern hemisphere footpoints of the spacecraft are found by tracing along the magnetic field line threading through the spacecraft per the given Tsyganenko and internal magnetic field models. The northern and southern hemisphere loss cone angles are also given. The magnetic field strength at the footpoints and the minimum magnetic field strength along the field line are also calculated by using the field models. Other variables list the spacecraft L-shell, the magnetic local time, the magnetic latitude and longitude, and whether the threading field line is open, closed, etc. Rotational quaternions are provided to allow coordinate transformation from GEI into 6 other coordinate systems including BSC, GEO, GSE, GSE2000, GSE, and SM. The list of ancillary variables includes the dipole tilt angle, the Dst and Kp actvity indices, and separate flags that denote satellite eclipse by the Earth and Moon.

16) MMS 4 Magnetic Ephemeris and Coordinates (MEC) Magnetic Ephemeris and Support (Tsyganenko 1989 Model, Quiet Conditions), Quick-Look Survey maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VSPO/NumericalData/MMS/4/Ephemeris/Survey/Level2/Tsyganenko_89_Quiet/PT30S
Start:2015-03-13 00:00:00 Observatory:MMS-4 Cadence:30 seconds
Stop:2016-09-14 08:00:00 Instrument:MMS 4 Ephemeris Resource:NumericalData
Magnetospheric Multiscale 4 (MMS 4) spacecraft position, velocity, attitude, angular momentum vector, and magnetic ephemeris and coordinates (MEC), Level-2 science data at Quick-Look (30 s) time resolution. The Magnetic ephemeris data are calculated by using the Tsyganenko 1989 magnetic field model for quiet magnetospheric conditions. Many variables are included in this data product including the magnetic field measured at the spacecraft. If possible, the northern and southern hemisphere footpoints of the spacecraft are found by tracing along the magnetic field line threading through the spacecraft per the given Tsyganenko and internal magnetic field models. The northern and southern hemisphere loss cone angles are also given. The magnetic field strength at the footpoints and the minimum magnetic field strength along the field line are also calculated by using the field models. Other variables list the spacecraft L-shell, the magnetic local time, the magnetic latitude and longitude, and whether the threading field line is open, closed, etc. Rotational quaternions are provided to allow coordinate transformation from GEI into 6 other coordinate systems including BSC, GEO, GSE, GSE2000, GSE, and SM. The list of ancillary variables includes the dipole tilt angle, the Dst and Kp actvity indices, and separate flags that denote satellite eclipse by the Earth and Moon.

17) MMS 4 Digital Signal Processor (DSP) Double Probe (ADP, SDP), Electric Field Power Spectral Density, Fast Survey maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VSPO/NumericalData/MMS/4/FIELDS/DSP/Fast/Level2/ElectricFieldPowerSpectralDensity/PT2S
Start:2015-03-17 00:00:00 Observatory:MMS-4 Cadence:2 seconds
Stop:2016-09-14 07:59:59 Instrument:MMS 4 FIELDS Suite, Axial Double Probe (ADP) Instrument Resource:NumericalData
The MMS electric field power spectral density (EPSD) is computed onboard by the Digital Signal Processor (DSP). The fast Fourier transform (FFT) calculation is performed on a digitized version of analog signals from the Axial Double Probe (ADP) and Spin-Plane Double Probe (SDP). This data product is computed in space from individual components that are not synchronized to the 1 second pulse. Therefore, the timing between channels can be inaccurate by a fraction of a second. The samples times are interval start times taken from the x component. The spectra are calculated via a 1024-point FFT algorithm on piecewise continuous sets of waveform data. Nine signals can be processed simultaneously. Six of the twelve DC-coupled E, DC-coupled V, or SCM signals (16384 samples/s) are selected for spectral processing at 100% duty cycle. In addition, the three AC-coupled signals (262,144 kS/s) each can be processed at 6.25% duty cycle. Each of the nine signals has 16, 1024-point FFT operations every second; the field-programmable gate array (FPGA) performs 144 FFTs per second. The FFT is performed by an arithmetic logic unit (ALU), which is controlled by a state machine. Both are hard-coded into the FPGA. The operation starts by applying a 1024-point Hanning window onto a waveform. Next, an FFT is implemented. The FFT is broken into a series of "butterfly" operations performed by the ALU. The result has real and imaginary data. Power spectra are calculated by taking the sum of squares of real and imaginary values (the ALU includes a multiplier), which produces a power spectrum with 512 frequency bins. The frequency bins are then combined to give pseudo-logarithmic frequency spacing (del f)/f. The spectra are reduced to 56 frequency bins with (del f)/f between 6% and 12% when possible. Narrow-band emissions can be fit to an accuracy of (del f)/f ~3%, allowing for an accurate determination of plasma density. The spectra can be averaged in time. The fastest reporting rate of any signal is 16 spectra per second. Reporting rates can be as slow a one spectra every 16 s (averaging 256 spectra). The averaging process has 48-bit accuracy to maximize the dynamic range. The amplitudes undergo a pseudo-logarithmic compression to an 8-bit number representing over 120 dB of dynamic range at ~5% precision.

18) MMS 4 Digital Signal Processor (DSP) Search Coil Magnetometer (SCM), Magnetic Field Power Spectral Density, Fast Survey maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VSPO/NumericalData/MMS/4/FIELDS/DSP/Fast/Level2/MagneticFieldPowerSpectralDensity/PT2S
Start:2015-03-17 00:00:00 Observatory:MMS-4 Cadence:2 seconds
Stop:2016-09-14 07:59:59 Instrument:MMS 4 FIELDS Suite, Digital Signal Processor (DSP) Resource:NumericalData
The MMS magnetic field power spectral density (BPSD) is computed onboard by the Digital Signal Processor (DSP). The fast Fourier transform (FFT) calculation is performed on a digitized version of analog signals from the Search Coil Magnetometer (SCM) in the SCM123 coordinate system (scm1 = - x sensor; scm2 = -z sensor; scm3 = -y sensor). This data product is computed in space from individual components that are not synchronized to the 1 second pulse. Therefore, the timing between channels can be inaccurate by a fraction of a second. The samples times are interval start times taken from the x component. The spectra are calculated via a 1024-point FFT algorithm on piecewise continuous sets of waveform data. Nine signals can be processed simultaneously. Six of the twelve DC-coupled E, DC-coupled V, or SCM signals (16384 samples/s) are selected for spectral processing at 100% duty cycle. In addition, the three AC-coupled signals (262,144 kS/s) each can be processed at 6.25% duty cycle. Each of the nine signals has 16, 1024-point FFT operations every second; the field-programmable gate array (FPGA) performs 144 FFTs per second. The FFT is performed by an arithmetic logic unit (ALU), which is controlled by a state machine. Both are hard-coded into the FPGA. The operation starts by applying a 1024-point Hanning window onto a waveform. Next, an FFT is implemented. The FFT is broken into a series of "butterfly" operations performed by the ALU. The result has real and imaginary data. Power spectra are calculated by taking the sum of squares of real and imaginary values (the ALU includes a multiplier), which produces a power spectrum with 512 frequency bins. The frequency bins are then combined to give pseudo-logarithmic frequency spacing (del f)/f. The spectra are reduced to 88 frequency bins with (del f)/f between 6% and 12% when possible. Narrow-band emissions can be fit to an accuracy of (del f)/f ~3%, allowing for an accurate determination of plasma density. The spectra can be averaged in time. The fastest reporting rate of any signal is 16 spectra per second. Reporting rates can be as slow a one spectra every 16 s (averaging 256 spectra). The averaging process has 48-bit accuracy to maximize the dynamic range. The amplitudes undergo a pseudo-logarithmic compression to an 8-bit number representing over 120 dB of dynamic range at ~5% precision.

19) MMS 4 Digital Signal Processor (DSP) Double Probe (ADP, SDP), Electric Field Power Spectral Density, Slow Survey maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VSPO/NumericalData/MMS/4/FIELDS/DSP/Slow/Level2/ElectricFieldPowerSpectralDensity/PT16S
Start:2015-07-28 00:00:00 Observatory:MMS-4 Cadence:16 seconds
Stop:2016-09-14 07:59:59 Instrument:MMS 4 FIELDS Suite, Axial Double Probe (ADP) Instrument Resource:NumericalData
The MMS electric field power spectral density (EPSD) is computed onboard by the Digital Signal Processor (DSP). The fast Fourier transform (FFT) calculation is performed on a digitized version of analog signals from the Axial Double Probe (ADP) and Spin-Plane Double Probe (SDP). This data product is computed in space from individual components that are not synchronized to the 1 second pulse. Therefore, the timing between channels can be inaccurate by a fraction of a second. The samples times are interval start times taken from the x component. The spectra are calculated via a 1024-point FFT algorithm on piecewise continuous sets of waveform data. Nine signals can be processed simultaneously. Six of the twelve DC-coupled E, DC-coupled V, or SCM signals (16384 samples/s) are selected for spectral processing at 100% duty cycle. In addition, the three AC-coupled signals (262,144 kS/s) each can be processed at 6.25% duty cycle. Each of the nine signals has 16, 1024-point FFT operations every second; the field-programmable gate array (FPGA) performs 144 FFTs per second. The FFT is performed by an arithmetic logic unit (ALU), which is controlled by a state machine. Both are hard-coded into the FPGA. The operation starts by applying a 1024-point Hanning window onto a waveform. Next, an FFT is implemented. The FFT is broken into a series of "butterfly" operations performed by the ALU. The result has real and imaginary data. Power spectra are calculated by taking the sum of squares of real and imaginary values (the ALU includes a multiplier), which produces a power spectrum with 512 frequency bins. The frequency bins are then combined to give pseudo-logarithmic frequency spacing (del f)/f. The spectra are reduced to 56 frequency bins with (del f)/f between 6% and 12% when possible. Narrow-band emissions can be fit to an accuracy of (del f)/f ~3%, allowing for an accurate determination of plasma density. The spectra can be averaged in time. The fastest reporting rate of any signal is 16 spectra per second. Reporting rates can be as slow a one spectra every 16 s (averaging 256 spectra). The averaging process has 48-bit accuracy to maximize the dynamic range. The amplitudes undergo a pseudo-logarithmic compression to an 8-bit number representing over 120 dB of dynamic range at ~5% precision.

20) MMS 4 Digital Signal Processor (DSP) Search Coil Magnetometer (SCM), Magnetic Field Power Spectral Density, Slow Survey maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VSPO/NumericalData/MMS/4/FIELDS/DSP/Slow/Level2/MagneticFieldPowerSpectralDensity/PT16S
Start:2015-03-17 00:00:00 Observatory:MMS-4 Cadence:16 seconds
Stop:2016-09-14 07:59:59 Instrument:MMS 4 FIELDS Suite, Digital Signal Processor (DSP) Resource:NumericalData
The MMS magnetic field power spectral density (BPSD) is computed onboard by the Digital Signal Processor (DSP). The fast Fourier transform (FFT) calculation is performed on a digitized version of analog signals from the Search Coil Magnetometer (SCM) in the SCM123 coordinate system (scm1 = - x sensor; scm2 = -z sensor; scm3 = -y sensor). This data product is computed in space from individual components that are not synchronized to the 1 second pulse. Therefore, the timing between channels can be inaccurate by a fraction of a second. The samples times are interval start times taken from the x component. The spectra are calculated via a 1024-point FFT algorithm on piecewise continuous sets of waveform data. Nine signals can be processed simultaneously. Six of the twelve DC-coupled E, DC-coupled V, or SCM signals (16384 samples/s) are selected for spectral processing at 100% duty cycle. In addition, the three AC-coupled signals (262,144 kS/s) each can be processed at 6.25% duty cycle. Each of the nine signals has 16, 1024-point FFT operations every second; the field-programmable gate array (FPGA) performs 144 FFTs per second. The FFT is performed by an arithmetic logic unit (ALU), which is controlled by a state machine. Both are hard-coded into the FPGA. The operation starts by applying a 1024-point Hanning window onto a waveform. Next, an FFT is implemented. The FFT is broken into a series of "butterfly" operations performed by the ALU. The result has real and imaginary data. Power spectra are calculated by taking the sum of squares of real and imaginary values (the ALU includes a multiplier), which produces a power spectrum with 512 frequency bins. The frequency bins are then combined to give pseudo-logarithmic frequency spacing (del f)/f. The spectra are reduced to 88 frequency bins with (del f)/f between 6% and 12% when possible. Narrow-band emissions can be fit to an accuracy of (del f)/f ~3%, allowing for an accurate determination of plasma density. The spectra can be averaged in time. The fastest reporting rate of any signal is 16 spectra per second. Reporting rates can be as slow a one spectra every 16 s (averaging 256 spectra). The averaging process has 48-bit accuracy to maximize the dynamic range. The amplitudes undergo a pseudo-logarithmic compression to an 8-bit number representing over 120 dB of dynamic range at ~5% precision.

21) MMS 4 Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Ambient Electron Flux, Projection Method 2 (PM2), Level 2, Burst Survey maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VSPO/NumericalData/MMS/4/FIELDS/EDI/Burst/Level2/AmbientElectronFlux/ProjectionMethod2/PT0.0009765625S
Start:2016-01-04 22:33:24 Observatory:MMS-4 Cadence:0.0009765625 seconds
Stop:2016-09-14 07:59:59 Instrument:MMS 4 FIELDS Suite, Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Resource:NumericalData
Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Ambient Burst Survey, Level 2, 0.0009765625 s Data (1024 samples/s). EDI has two scientific data acquisition modes, called electric field mode and ambient mode. In electric field mode, two coded electron beams are emitted such that they return to the detectors after one or more gyrations in the ambient magnetic and electric field. The firing directions and times-of-flight allow the derivation of the drift velocity and electric field. In ambient mode, the electron beams are not used. The detectors with their large geometric factors and their ability to adjust the field of view quickly allow continuous sampling of ambient electrons at a selected pitch angle and fixed but selectable energy. To find the beam directions that will hit the detector, EDI sweeps each beam in the plane perpendicular to B at a fixed angular rate of 0.22 /ms until a signal has been acquired by the detector. Once signal has been acquired, the beams are swept back and forth to stay on target. Beam detection is not determined from the changes in the count-rates directly, but from the square of the beam counts divided by the background counts from ambient electrons, i.e., from the square of the instantaneous signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). This quantity is computed from data provided by the correlator in the Gun-Detector Electronics that also generates the coding pattern imposed on the outgoing beams. If the squared SNR ratio exceeds a threshold, this is taken as evidence that the beam is returning to the detector. The thresholds for SNR are chosen dependent on background fluxes. They represent a compromise between getting false hits (induced by strong variations in background electron fluxes) and missing true beam hits. The basic software loop that controls EDI operations is executed every 2 ms. As the times when the beams hit their detectors are neither synchronized with the telemetry nor equidistant, EDI data have no fixed time-resolution. Data are reported in telemetry slots. In Survey, using the standard packing mode 0, there are eight telemetry slots per second and Gyn Detector Unit (GDU). The last beam detected during the previous slot will be reported in the current slot. If no beam has been detected, the data quality will be set to zero. In Burst telemetry there are 128 slots per second and GDU. The data in each slot consists of information regarding the beam firing directions (stored in the form of analytic gun deflection voltages), times-of-flight (if successfully measured), quality indicators, time stamps of the beam hits, and some auxiliary correlator-related information. Whenever EDI is not in electron drift mode, it uses its ambient electron mode. The mode has the capability to sample at either 90 degrees pitch angle or at 0/180 degrees (field aligned), or to alternate between 90 degrees and field aligned with selectable dwell times. While all options have been demonstrated during the commissioning phase, only the field aligned mode has been used in the routine operations phase. The choices for energy are 250 eV, 500 eV, and 1 keV. The two detectors, which are facing opposite hemispheres, are looking strictly into opposite directions, so while one detector is looking along B the other is looking antiparallel to B (corresponding to pitch angles of 180 and 0 degrees, respectively). The two detectors switch roles every half spin of the spacecraft as the tip of the magnetic field vector spins outside the field of view of one detector and into the field of view of the other detector. Starting January 4, 2016, the anodes were chosen such that the projection of the magnetic field vector was best aligned with the center of the first (that is, outer) of the four anodes. This provides coverage of a larger range of pitch angles in general. Data taken in this configuration are identified by the term "amb-pm2" in the data product names. In the burst data where four channels (corresponding to the four adjacent sensor anode pads) are sampled per GDU, channel 1 represents best the pitch angle of 0 degrees (or 180 degrees). The EDI instrument paper can be found at: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs11214-015-0182-7. The EDI instrument data products guide can be found at https://lasp.colorado.edu/mms/sdc/public/datasets/fields/.

22) MMS 4 Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Electric Field, Level 2, Burst Survey maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VSPO/NumericalData/MMS/4/FIELDS/EDI/Burst/Level2/ElectricField/PT0.0009765625S
Start:2015-09-14 14:16:34 Observatory:MMS-4 Cadence:0.0009765625 seconds
Stop:2016-09-14 07:59:59 Instrument:MMS 4 FIELDS Suite, Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Resource:NumericalData
Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Electric Field Burst Survey, Level 2, 0.0009765625 s Data (1024 samples/s). EDI has two scientific data acquisition modes, called electric field mode and ambient mode. In electric field mode, two coded electron beams are emitted such that they return to the detectors after one or more gyrations in the ambient magnetic and electric field. The firing directions and times-of-flight allow the derivation of the drift velocity and electric field. In ambient mode, the electron beams are not used. The detectors with their large geometric factors and their ability to adjust the field of view quickly allow continuous sampling of ambient electrons at a selected pitch angle and fixed but selectable energy. To find the beam directions that will hit the detector, EDI sweeps each beam in the plane perpendicular to B at a fixed angular rate of 0.22 /ms until a signal has been acquired by the detector. Once signal has been acquired, the beams are swept back and forth to stay on target. Beam detection is not determined from the changes in the count-rates directly, but from the square of the beam counts divided by the background counts from ambient electrons, i.e., from the square of the instantaneous signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). This quantity is computed from data provided by the correlator in the Gun-Detector Electronics that also generates the coding pattern imposed on the outgoing beams. If the squared SNR ratio exceeds a threshold, this is taken as evidence that the beam is returning to the detector. The thresholds for SNR are chosen dependent on background fluxes. They represent a compromise between getting false hits (induced by strong variations in background electron fluxes) and missing true beam hits. The basic software loop that controls EDI operations is executed every 2 ms. As the times when the beams hit their detectors are neither synchronized with the telemetry nor equidistant, EDI data have no fixed time-resolution. Data are reported in telemetry slots. In Survey, using the standard packing mode 0, there are eight telemetry slots per second and Gyn Detector Unit (GDU). The last beam detected during the previous slot will be reported in the current slot. If no beam has been detected, the data quality will be set to zero. In Burst telemetry there are 128 slots per second and GDU. The data in each slot consists of information regarding the beam firing directions (stored in the form of analytic gun deflection voltages), times-of-flight (if successfully measured), quality indicators, time stamps of the beam hits, and some auxiliary correlator-related information. Whenever EDI is not in electron drift mode, it uses its ambient electron mode. The mode has the capability to sample at either 90 degrees pitch angle or at 0/180 degrees (field aligned), or to alternate between 90 degrees and field aligned with selectable dwell times. While all options have been demonstrated during the commissioning phase, only the field aligned mode has been used in the routine operations phase. The choices for energy are 250 eV, 500 eV, and 1 keV. The two detectors, which are facing opposite hemispheres, are looking strictly into opposite directions, so while one detector is looking along B the other is looking antiparallel to B (corresponding to pitch angles of 180 and 0 degrees, respectively). The two detectors switch roles every half spin of the spacecraft as the tip of the magnetic field vector spins outside the field of view of one detector and into the field of view of the other detector. This is the primary data product generated from data collected in electric field mode. The science data generated are drift velocity and electric field data in various coordinate systems. They are derived from triangulation and/or time-of-flight analysis. Where both methods are applicable, their results will be combined using a weighting approach based on their relative errors. The EDI instrument paper can be found at: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs11214-015-0182-7. The EDI instrument data products guide can be found at https://lasp.colorado.edu/mms/sdc/public/datasets/fields/.

23) MMS 4 Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Ambient Electron Flux, Projection Method 1 (PM1), Level 2, Burst Survey maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VSPO/NumericalData/MMS/4/FIELDS/EDI/Burst/Level2/ElectronFluxAmbient/ProjectionMethod1/PT0.0009765625S
Start:2015-09-02 13:39:04 Observatory:MMS-4 Cadence:0.0009765625 seconds
Stop:2016-09-14 07:59:59 Instrument:MMS 4 FIELDS Suite, Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Resource:NumericalData
Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Ambient Burst Survey, Level 2, 0.0009765625 s Data (1024 samples/s). EDI has two scientific data acquisition modes, called electric field mode and ambient mode. In electric field mode, two coded electron beams are emitted such that they return to the detectors after one or more gyrations in the ambient magnetic and electric field. The firing directions and times-of-flight allow the derivation of the drift velocity and electric field. In ambient mode, the electron beams are not used. The detectors with their large geometric factors and their ability to adjust the field of view quickly allow continuous sampling of ambient electrons at a selected pitch angle and fixed but selectable energy. To find the beam directions that will hit the detector, EDI sweeps each beam in the plane perpendicular to B at a fixed angular rate of 0.22 /ms until a signal has been acquired by the detector. Once signal has been acquired, the beams are swept back and forth to stay on target. Beam detection is not determined from the changes in the count-rates directly, but from the square of the beam counts divided by the background counts from ambient electrons, i.e., from the square of the instantaneous signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). This quantity is computed from data provided by the correlator in the Gun-Detector Electronics that also generates the coding pattern imposed on the outgoing beams. If the squared SNR ratio exceeds a threshold, this is taken as evidence that the beam is returning to the detector. The thresholds for SNR are chosen dependent on background fluxes. They represent a compromise between getting false hits (induced by strong variations in background electron fluxes) and missing true beam hits. The basic software loop that controls EDI operations is executed every 2 ms. As the times when the beams hit their detectors are neither synchronized with the telemetry nor equidistant, EDI data have no fixed time-resolution. Data are reported in telemetry slots. In Survey, using the standard packing mode 0, there are eight telemetry slots per second and Gyn Detector Unit (GDU). The last beam detected during the previous slot will be reported in the current slot. If no beam has been detected, the data quality will be set to zero. In Burst telemetry there are 128 slots per second and GDU. The data in each slot consists of information regarding the beam firing directions (stored in the form of analytic gun deflection voltages), times-of-flight (if successfully measured), quality indicators, time stamps of the beam hits, and some auxiliary correlator-related information. Whenever EDI is not in electron drift mode, it uses its ambient electron mode. The mode has the capability to sample at either 90 degrees pitch angle or at 0/180 degrees (field aligned), or to alternate between 90 degrees and field aligned with selectable dwell times. While all options have been demonstrated during the commissioning phase, only the field aligned mode has been used in the routine operations phase. The choices for energy are 250 eV, 500 eV, and 1 keV. The two detectors, which are facing opposite hemispheres, are looking strictly into opposite directions, so while one detector is looking along B the other is looking antiparallel to B (corresponding to pitch angles of 180 and 0 degrees, respectively). The two detectors switch roles every half spin of the spacecraft as the tip of the magnetic field vector spins outside the field of view of one detector and into the field of view of the other detector. Up until January 4, 2016 the anodes were chosen such that the magnetic field vector projected into the plane of the micro-channel plate entry surface was best aligned with the center of the four anodes ( that is, with the gap between the inner two of the four anodes). Data taken in this configuration are using the term "amb" in the data product names. In the burst data where four channels (corresponding to the four adjacent sensor anode pads) are sampled per GDU, the average (or sum) of the center two channels (channels 2 and 3) represents best the pitch angle of 0 degrees (or 180 degrees). The EDI instrument paper can be found at: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs11214-015-0182-7. The EDI instrument data products guide can be found at https://lasp.colorado.edu/mms/sdc/public/datasets/fields/.

24) MMS 4 Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Quality 0 Counts, Level 2, Burst Survey maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VSPO/NumericalData/MMS/4/FIELDS/EDI/Burst/Level2/QualityZero/PT0.0078125S
Start:2015-09-14 13:58:04 Observatory:MMS-4 Cadence:0.0078125 seconds
Stop:2016-09-14 07:59:59 Instrument:MMS 4 FIELDS Suite, Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Resource:NumericalData
Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Q0 Burst Survey, Level 2, 0.0078125 s Data (128 samples/s). EDI has two scientific data acquisition modes, called electric field mode and ambient mode. In electric field mode, two coded electron beams are emitted such that they return to the detectors after one or more gyrations in the ambient magnetic and electric field. The firing directions and times-of-flight allow the derivation of the drift velocity and electric field. In ambient mode, the electron beams are not used. The detectors with their large geometric factors and their ability to adjust the field of view quickly allow continuous sampling of ambient electrons at a selected pitch angle and fixed but selectable energy. To find the beam directions that will hit the detector, EDI sweeps each beam in the plane perpendicular to B at a fixed angular rate of 0.22 /ms until a signal has been acquired by the detector. Once signal has been acquired, the beams are swept back and forth to stay on target. Beam detection is not determined from the changes in the count-rates directly, but from the square of the beam counts divided by the background counts from ambient electrons, i.e., from the square of the instantaneous signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). This quantity is computed from data provided by the correlator in the Gun-Detector Electronics that also generates the coding pattern imposed on the outgoing beams. If the squared SNR ratio exceeds a threshold, this is taken as evidence that the beam is returning to the detector. The thresholds for SNR are chosen dependent on background fluxes. They represent a compromise between getting false hits (induced by strong variations in background electron fluxes) and missing true beam hits. The basic software loop that controls EDI operations is executed every 2 ms. As the times when the beams hit their detectors are neither synchronized with the telemetry nor equidistant, EDI data have no fixed time-resolution. Data are reported in telemetry slots. In Survey, using the standard packing mode 0, there are eight telemetry slots per second and Gyn Detector Unit (GDU). The last beam detected during the previous slot will be reported in the current slot. If no beam has been detected, the data quality will be set to zero. In Burst telemetry there are 128 slots per second and GDU. The data in each slot consists of information regarding the beam firing directions (stored in the form of analytic gun deflection voltages), times-of-flight (if successfully measured), quality indicators, time stamps of the beam hits, and some auxiliary correlator-related information. Whenever EDI is not in electron drift mode, it uses its ambient electron mode. The mode has the capability to sample at either 90 degrees pitch angle or at 0/180 degrees (field aligned), or to alternate between 90 degrees and field aligned with selectable dwell times. While all options have been demonstrated during the commissioning phase, only the field aligned mode has been used in the routine operations phase. The choices for energy are 250 eV, 500 eV, and 1 keV. The two detectors, which are facing opposite hemispheres, are looking strictly into opposite directions, so while one detector is looking along B the other is looking antiparallel to B (corresponding to pitch angles of 180 and 0 degrees, respectively). The two detectors switch roles every half spin of the spacecraft as the tip of the magnetic field vector spins outside the field of view of one detector and into the field of view of the other detector. These data are a by-product generated from data collected in electric field mode. Whenever no return beam is found in a particular time slot by the flight software to be reported will be flagged with the lowest quality level (quality zero). The ground processing generates a separate data product from these counts data. The EDI instrument paper can be found at: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs11214-015-0182-7. The EDI instrument data products guide can be found at https://lasp.colorado.edu/mms/sdc/public/datasets/fields/.

25) MMS 4 Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Electric Field, Level 2, Quick-Look Survey maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VSPO/NumericalData/MMS/4/FIELDS/EDI/Survey/Level2/ElectricField/PT5S
Start:2015-09-03 00:00:00 Observatory:MMS-4 Cadence:5 seconds
Stop:2016-09-14 07:59:59 Instrument:MMS 4 FIELDS Suite, Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Resource:NumericalData
Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Electric Field Survey, Level 2, 5 s Data. EDI has two scientific data acquisition modes, called electric field mode and ambient mode. In electric field mode, two coded electron beams are emitted such that they return to the detectors after one or more gyrations in the ambient magnetic and electric field. The firing directions and times-of-flight allow the derivation of the drift velocity and electric field. In ambient mode, the electron beams are not used. The detectors with their large geometric factors and their ability to adjust the field of view quickly allow continuous sampling of ambient electrons at a selected pitch angle and fixed but selectable energy. To find the beam directions that will hit the detector, EDI sweeps each beam in the plane perpendicular to B at a fixed angular rate of 0.22 /ms until a signal has been acquired by the detector. Once signal has been acquired, the beams are swept back and forth to stay on target. Beam detection is not determined from the changes in the count-rates directly, but from the square of the beam counts divided by the background counts from ambient electrons, i.e., from the square of the instantaneous signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). This quantity is computed from data provided by the correlator in the Gun-Detector Electronics that also generates the coding pattern imposed on the outgoing beams. If the squared SNR ratio exceeds a threshold, this is taken as evidence that the beam is returning to the detector. The thresholds for SNR are chosen dependent on background fluxes. They represent a compromise between getting false hits (induced by strong variations in background electron fluxes) and missing true beam hits. The basic software loop that controls EDI operations is executed every 2 ms. As the times when the beams hit their detectors are neither synchronized with the telemetry nor equidistant, EDI data have no fixed time-resolution. Data are reported in telemetry slots. In Survey, using the standard packing mode 0, there are eight telemetry slots per second and Gyn Detector Unit (GDU). The last beam detected during the previous slot will be reported in the current slot. If no beam has been detected, the data quality will be set to zero. In Burst telemetry there are 128 slots per second and GDU. The data in each slot consists of information regarding the beam firing directions (stored in the form of analytic gun deflection voltages), times-of-flight (if successfully measured), quality indicators, time stamps of the beam hits, and some auxiliary correlator-related information. Whenever EDI is not in electron drift mode, it uses its ambient electron mode. The mode has the capability to sample at either 90 degrees pitch angle or at 0/180 degrees (field aligned), or to alternate between 90 degrees and field aligned with selectable dwell times. While all options have been demonstrated during the commissioning phase, only the field aligned mode has been used in the routine operations phase. The choices for energy are 250 eV, 500 eV, and 1 keV. The two detectors, which are facing opposite hemispheres, are looking strictly into opposite directions, so while one detector is looking along B the other is looking antiparallel to B (corresponding to pitch angles of 180 and 0 degrees, respectively). The two detectors switch roles every half spin of the spacecraft as the tip of the magnetic field vector spins outside the field of view of one detector and into the field of view of the other detector. This is the primary data product generated from data collected in electric field mode. The science data generated are drift velocity and electric field data in various coordinate systems. They are derived from triangulation and/or time-of-flight analysis. Where both methods are applicable, their results will be combined using a weighting approach based on their relative errors. The EDI instrument paper can be found at: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs11214-015-0182-7. The EDI instrument data products guide can be found at https://lasp.colorado.edu/mms/sdc/public/datasets/fields/.

26) MMS 4 Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Ambient Electron Flux, Projection Method 1 (PM1), Level 2, Quick-Look Survey maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VSPO/NumericalData/MMS/4/FIELDS/EDI/Survey/Level2/ElectronFluxAmbient/ProjectionMethod1/PT0.03125S
Start:2015-09-02 00:00:00 Observatory:MMS-4 Cadence:0.03125 seconds
Stop:2016-09-14 07:59:59 Instrument:MMS 4 FIELDS Suite, Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Resource:NumericalData
Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Ambient Survey, Level 2, 0.03125 s Data. (32 samples/s)EDI has two scientific data acquisition modes, called electric field mode and ambient mode. In electric field mode, two coded electron beams are emitted such that they return to the detectors after one or more gyrations in the ambient magnetic and electric field. The firing directions and times-of-flight allow the derivation of the drift velocity and electric field. In ambient mode, the electron beams are not used. The detectors with their large geometric factors and their ability to adjust the field of view quickly allow continuous sampling of ambient electrons at a selected pitch angle and fixed but selectable energy. To find the beam directions that will hit the detector, EDI sweeps each beam in the plane perpendicular to B at a fixed angular rate of 0.22 /ms until a signal has been acquired by the detector. Once signal has been acquired, the beams are swept back and forth to stay on target. Beam detection is not determined from the changes in the count-rates directly, but from the square of the beam counts divided by the background counts from ambient electrons, i.e., from the square of the instantaneous signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). This quantity is computed from data provided by the correlator in the Gun-Detector Electronics that also generates the coding pattern imposed on the outgoing beams. If the squared SNR ratio exceeds a threshold, this is taken as evidence that the beam is returning to the detector. The thresholds for SNR are chosen dependent on background fluxes. They represent a compromise between getting false hits (induced by strong variations in background electron fluxes) and missing true beam hits. The basic software loop that controls EDI operations is executed every 2 ms. As the times when the beams hit their detectors are neither synchronized with the telemetry nor equidistant, EDI data have no fixed time-resolution. Data are reported in telemetry slots. In Survey, using the standard packing mode 0, there are eight telemetry slots per second and Gyn Detector Unit (GDU). The last beam detected during the previous slot will be reported in the current slot. If no beam has been detected, the data quality will be set to zero. In Burst telemetry there are 128 slots per second and GDU. The data in each slot consists of information regarding the beam firing directions (stored in the form of analytic gun deflection voltages), times-of-flight (if successfully measured), quality indicators, time stamps of the beam hits, and some auxiliary correlator-related information. Whenever EDI is not in electron drift mode, it uses its ambient electron mode. The mode has the capability to sample at either 90 degrees pitch angle or at 0/180 degrees (field aligned), or to alternate between 90 degrees and field aligned with selectable dwell times. While all options have been demonstrated during the commissioning phase, only the field aligned mode has been used in the routine operations phase. The choices for energy are 250 eV, 500 eV, and 1 keV. The two detectors, which are facing opposite hemispheres, are looking strictly into opposite directions, so while one detector is looking along B the other is looking antiparallel to B (corresponding to pitch angles of 180 and 0 degrees, respectively). The two detectors switch roles every half spin of the spacecraft as the tip of the magnetic field vector spins outside the field of view of one detector and into the field of view of the other detector. Up until January 4, 2016 the anodes were chosen such that the magnetic field vector projected into the plane of the micro-channel plate entry surface was best aligned with the center of the four anodes ( that is, with the gap between the inner two of the four anodes). Data taken in this configuration are using the term "amb" in the data product names. In the burst data where four channels (corresponding to the four adjacent sensor anode pads) are sampled per GDU, the average (or sum) of the center two channels (channels 2 and 3) represents best the pitch angle of 0 degrees (or 180 degrees). The EDI instrument paper can be found at: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs11214-015-0182-7. The EDI instrument data products guide can be found at https://lasp.colorado.edu/mms/sdc/public/datasets/fields/.

27) MMS 4 Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Ambient Electron Flux, Projection Method 2 (PM2), Level 2, Quick-Look Survey maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VSPO/NumericalData/MMS/4/FIELDS/EDI/Survey/Level2/ElectronFluxAmbient/ProjectionMethod2/PT0.03125S
Start:2016-01-05 00:00:00 Observatory:MMS-4 Cadence:0.03125 seconds
Stop:2016-09-14 07:59:59 Instrument:MMS 4 FIELDS Suite, Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Resource:NumericalData
Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Ambient Survey, Level 2, 0.03125 s Data (32 samples/s). EDI has two scientific data acquisition modes, called electric field mode and ambient mode. In electric field mode, two coded electron beams are emitted such that they return to the detectors after one or more gyrations in the ambient magnetic and electric field. The firing directions and times-of-flight allow the derivation of the drift velocity and electric field. In ambient mode, the electron beams are not used. The detectors with their large geometric factors and their ability to adjust the field of view quickly allow continuous sampling of ambient electrons at a selected pitch angle and fixed but selectable energy. To find the beam directions that will hit the detector, EDI sweeps each beam in the plane perpendicular to B at a fixed angular rate of 0.22 /ms until a signal has been acquired by the detector. Once signal has been acquired, the beams are swept back and forth to stay on target. Beam detection is not determined from the changes in the count-rates directly, but from the square of the beam counts divided by the background counts from ambient electrons, i.e., from the square of the instantaneous signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). This quantity is computed from data provided by the correlator in the Gun-Detector Electronics that also generates the coding pattern imposed on the outgoing beams. If the squared SNR ratio exceeds a threshold, this is taken as evidence that the beam is returning to the detector. The thresholds for SNR are chosen dependent on background fluxes. They represent a compromise between getting false hits (induced by strong variations in background electron fluxes) and missing true beam hits. The basic software loop that controls EDI operations is executed every 2 ms. As the times when the beams hit their detectors are neither synchronized with the telemetry nor equidistant, EDI data have no fixed time-resolution. Data are reported in telemetry slots. In Survey, using the standard packing mode 0, there are eight telemetry slots per second and Gyn Detector Unit (GDU). The last beam detected during the previous slot will be reported in the current slot. If no beam has been detected, the data quality will be set to zero. In Burst telemetry there are 128 slots per second and GDU. The data in each slot consists of information regarding the beam firing directions (stored in the form of analytic gun deflection voltages), times-of-flight (if successfully measured), quality indicators, time stamps of the beam hits, and some auxiliary correlator-related information. Whenever EDI is not in electron drift mode, it uses its ambient electron mode. The mode has the capability to sample at either 90 degrees pitch angle or at 0/180 degrees (field aligned), or to alternate between 90 degrees and field aligned with selectable dwell times. While all options have been demonstrated during the commissioning phase, only the field aligned mode has been used in the routine operations phase. The choices for energy are 250 eV, 500 eV, and 1 keV. The two detectors, which are facing opposite hemispheres, are looking strictly into opposite directions, so while one detector is looking along B the other is looking antiparallel to B (corresponding to pitch angles of 180 and 0 degrees, respectively). The two detectors switch roles every half spin of the spacecraft as the tip of the magnetic field vector spins outside the field of view of one detector and into the field of view of the other detector. Starting January 4, 2016, the anodes were chosen such that the projection of the magnetic field vector was best aligned with the center of the first (that is, outer) of the four anodes. This provides coverage of a larger range of pitch angles in general. Data taken in this configuration are identified by the term "amb-pm2" in the data product names. In the burst data where four channels (corresponding to the four adjacent sensor anode pads) are sampled per GDU, channel 1 represents best the pitch angle of 0 degrees (or 180 degrees). The EDI instrument paper can be found at: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs11214-015-0182-7. The EDI instrument data products guide can be found at https://lasp.colorado.edu/mms/sdc/public/datasets/fields/.

28) MMS 4 Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Quality Zero Counts, Level 2, Quick-Look Survey maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VSPO/NumericalData/MMS/4/FIELDS/EDI/Survey/Level2/QualityZero/PT0.125S
Start:2015-04-22 00:00:00 Observatory:MMS-4 Cadence:0.125 seconds
Stop:2016-09-14 07:59:59 Instrument:MMS 4 FIELDS Suite, Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Resource:NumericalData
Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) Q0 Survey, Level 2, 0.125 s Data (8 samples/s). EDI has two scientific data acquisition modes, called electric field mode and ambient mode. In electric field mode, two coded electron beams are emitted such that they return to the detectors after one or more gyrations in the ambient magnetic and electric field. The firing directions and times-of-flight allow the derivation of the drift velocity and electric field. In ambient mode, the electron beams are not used. The detectors with their large geometric factors and their ability to adjust the field of view quickly allow continuous sampling of ambient electrons at a selected pitch angle and fixed but selectable energy. To find the beam directions that will hit the detector, EDI sweeps each beam in the plane perpendicular to B at a fixed angular rate of 0.22 /ms until a signal has been acquired by the detector. Once signal has been acquired, the beams are swept back and forth to stay on target. Beam detection is not determined from the changes in the count-rates directly, but from the square of the beam counts divided by the background counts from ambient electrons, i.e., from the square of the instantaneous signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). This quantity is computed from data provided by the correlator in the Gun-Detector Electronics that also generates the coding pattern imposed on the outgoing beams. If the squared SNR ratio exceeds a threshold, this is taken as evidence that the beam is returning to the detector. The thresholds for SNR are chosen dependent on background fluxes. They represent a compromise between getting false hits (induced by strong variations in background electron fluxes) and missing true beam hits. The basic software loop that controls EDI operations is executed every 2 ms. As the times when the beams hit their detectors are neither synchronized with the telemetry nor equidistant, EDI data have no fixed time-resolution. Data are reported in telemetry slots. In Survey, using the standard packing mode 0, there are eight telemetry slots per second and Gyn Detector Unit (GDU). The last beam detected during the previous slot will be reported in the current slot. If no beam has been detected, the data quality will be set to zero. In Burst telemetry there are 128 slots per second and GDU. The data in each slot consists of information regarding the beam firing directions (stored in the form of analytic gun deflection voltages), times-of-flight (if successfully measured), quality indicators, time stamps of the beam hits, and some auxiliary correlator-related information. Whenever EDI is not in electron drift mode, it uses its ambient electron mode. The mode has the capability to sample at either 90 degrees pitch angle or at 0/180 degrees (field aligned), or to alternate between 90 degrees and field aligned with selectable dwell times. While all options have been demonstrated during the commissioning phase, only the field aligned mode has been used in the routine operations phase. The choices for energy are 250 eV, 500 eV, and 1 keV. The two detectors, which are facing opposite hemispheres, are looking strictly into opposite directions, so while one detector is looking along B the other is looking antiparallel to B (corresponding to pitch angles of 180 and 0 degrees, respectively). The two detectors switch roles every half spin of the spacecraft as the tip of the magnetic field vector spins outside the field of view of one detector and into the field of view of the other detector. These data are a by-product generated from data collected in electric field mode. Whenever no return beam is found in a particular time slot by the flight software to be reported will be flagged with the lowest quality level (quality zero). The ground processing generates a separate data product from these counts data. The EDI instrument paper can be found at: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs11214-015-0182-7. The EDI instrument data products guide can be found at https://lasp.colorado.edu/mms/sdc/public/datasets/fields/.

29) MMS 4 Electric Double Probe (EDP) Three-Dimensional Electric Field, Quick-Look, Burst Survey maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VSPO/NumericalData/MMS/4/FIELDS/EDP/Burst/Level2/DCElectricField/PT0.0001220703125S
Start:2015-08-02 00:03:44 Observatory:MMS-4 Cadence:0.0001220703125 seconds
Stop:2016-09-14 07:59:59 Instrument:MMS 4 FIELDS Suite, Axial Double Probe (ADP) Instrument Resource:NumericalData
Electric Double Probe, Quick-Look Three-Dimensional Electric Field, Level 2, Burst Survey Data

30) MMS 4 Electric Double Probe (EDP) Spacecraft Potential, Burst Survey maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VSPO/NumericalData/MMS/4/FIELDS/EDP/Burst/Level2/SpacecraftPotential/PT0.0001220703125S
Start:2015-07-30 23:06:54 Observatory:MMS-4 Cadence:0.0001220703125 seconds
Stop:2016-09-14 07:59:59 Instrument:MMS 4 FIELDS Suite, Axial Double Probe (ADP) Instrument Resource:NumericalData
Electric Double Probe, Dual Probe Spacecraft Potential, Level 2, Burst Survey Data. Spacecraft potential is etstimatrd by averaging measurements of the probe-to-spacecraft potential from several probes.

31) MMS 4 Axial Double Probe, Spin Plane Double Probe (ADP-SDP) Three-Dimensional HMFE Electric Field, Level 2, Burst Survey maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VSPO/NumericalData/MMS/4/FIELDS/EDP/Burst/Level2Pre/HMFE/PT0.00001525878906S
Start:2015-09-01 12:11:14 Observatory:MMS-4 Cadence:0.00001525878906 seconds
Stop:2016-09-14 07:59:59 Instrument:MMS 4 FIELDS Suite, Axial Double Probe (ADP) Instrument Resource:NumericalData
Electric Double Probe, Three-Dimensional HMFE Electric Field, Level 2, Burst Survey, Level 1B AC Electric Field Data

32) MMS 4 Electric Double Probe (EDP) Three-Dimensional Electric Field, Quick-Look, Fast Survey maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VSPO/NumericalData/MMS/4/FIELDS/EDP/Fast/Level2/DCElectricField/PT0.03125S
Start:2015-08-15 00:00:00 Observatory:MMS-4 Cadence:0.03125 seconds
Stop:2016-09-14 07:59:59 Instrument:MMS 4 FIELDS Suite, Axial Double Probe (ADP) Instrument Resource:NumericalData
Electric Double Probe, Quick-Look Three-Dimensional Electric Field, Level 2, Fast Survey Data

33) MMS 4 Electric Double Probe (EDP) Spacecraft Potential, Fast Survey maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VSPO/NumericalData/MMS/4/FIELDS/EDP/Fast/Level2/SpacecraftPotential/PT0.03125S
Start:2015-07-28 00:00:00 Observatory:MMS-4 Cadence:0.03125 seconds
Stop:2016-09-14 07:59:59 Instrument:MMS 4 FIELDS Suite, Axial Double Probe (ADP) Instrument Resource:NumericalData
Electric Double Probe, Dual Probe Spacecraft Potential, Level 2, Fast Survey Data. Spacecraft potential is etstimatrd by averaging measurements of the probe-to-spacecraft potential from several probes.

34) MMS 4 Electric Double Probe (EDP) Three-Dimensional Electric Field, Quick-Look, Slow Survey maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VSPO/NumericalData/MMS/4/FIELDS/EDP/Slow/Level2/DCElectricField/PT0.125S
Start:2015-08-15 00:00:00 Observatory:MMS-4 Cadence:0.125 seconds
Stop:2016-09-14 07:59:59 Instrument:MMS 4 FIELDS Suite, Axial Double Probe (ADP) Instrument Resource:NumericalData
Electric Double Probe, Quick-Look Three-Dimensional Electric Field, Level 2, Slow Survey Data

35) MMS 4 Electric Double Probe (EDP) Spacecraft Potential, Slow Survey maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VSPO/NumericalData/MMS/4/FIELDS/EDP/Slow/Level2/SpacecraftPotential/PT0.125S
Start:2015-07-28 00:00:00 Observatory:MMS-4 Cadence:0.125 seconds
Stop:2016-09-14 07:59:59 Instrument:MMS 4 FIELDS Suite, Axial Double Probe (ADP) Instrument Resource:NumericalData
Electric Double Probe, Dual Probe Spacecraft Potential, Level 2, Slow Survey Data. Spacecraft potential is etstimatrd by averaging measurements of the probe-to-spacecraft potential from several probes.

36) MMS 4 Axial Double Probe, Spin Plane Double Probe (ADP-SDP) Electric Double Probe, High-Frequency Electric Field Spectra, Level 2, Survey maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VSPO/NumericalData/MMS/4/FIELDS/EDP/Survey/Level2/HighFrequencyElectricFieldSpectra/PT16S
Start:2015-09-01 00:00:00 Observatory:MMS-4 Cadence:16 seconds
Stop:2016-09-14 07:59:59 Instrument:MMS 4 FIELDS Suite, Axial Double Probe (ADP) Instrument Resource:NumericalData
Electric Double Probe, High-Frequency AC Electric Field Spectra, Level 2, Survey Data, Level 1B AC Electric Field Data

37) MMS 4 Flux Gate Magnetometer (FGM) DC Magnetic Field, Level 2, Burst Survey maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VSPO/NumericalData/MMS/4/FIELDS/FGM/Burst/Level2/PT0.0078125S
Start:2015-09-01 12:11:14 Observatory:MMS-4 Cadence:0.0078125 seconds
Stop:2016-09-14 07:59:59 Instrument:MMS 4 FIELDS Suite, Fluxgate Magnetometer (FGM) Instrument Resource:NumericalData
The Fluxgate Magnetometers (FGM) on Magnetospheric Multiscale consist of a traditional Analog Fluxgate Magnetometer (AFG) and a Digital Fluxgate magnetometer (DFG). The dual magnetometers are operated as a single instrument providing a single intercalibrated data product. Range changes occur at different times on the two instruments so the gains checked each periapsis can be carried out unambiguously to apoapsis. Cross correlation of calibration parameters can separate causes of the any apparent calibration changes. Use of Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) to determine the field along the rotation axis allows accurate monitoring of the zero levels along the rotation axis. Prior to launch the magnetometers were calibrated at the Technical University, Braunschweig, except for the AFG magnetometers on MMS3 and MMS4, which were calibrated at UCLA. Both sets of sensors are operated for the entire MMS orbit, with slow survey (8 samples per second) outside of the Region of Interest (ROI), and fast survey (16 samples per second) inside the ROI. Within the ROI, burst mode data (128 samples per second) are also acquired. A detailed description of the MMS fluxgate magnetometers, including science objectives, instrument description, calibration, magnetic cleanliness program, and data flow can be found at http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs11214-014-0057-3 (DOI 10.1007/s11214-014-0057-3). Additional information can also be found at http://www-spc.igpp.ucla.edu/ssc/mms (UCLA), and http://www.iwf.oeaw.ac.at/de/forschung/erdnaher-weltraum/mms/dfg (IWF, Graz). For the purpose of creating a unified FGM Level 2 data product, burst mode data is taken from DFG and survey mode data is taken from AFG. Because AFG and DFG are cross-calibrated on an orbit-averaged basis, small differences in offset may be observed between Level 2 burst and survey mode data. Consequently, any differences are within the error of the measurement. Based on preliminary analysis of the data, the absolute error within the Region of Interest (ROI) is estimated to be no more than 0.1 nT in the spin-plane, 0.15 nT along the spin-axis and 0.2 nT in total magnitude.

38) MMS 4 Flux Gate Magnetometer (FGM) Combined Fast/Slow Survey DC Magnetic Field, Level 2, Quick-Look Survey maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VSPO/NumericalData/MMS/4/FIELDS/FGM/Survey/Level2/PT0.125S
Start:2015-09-01 00:00:00 Observatory:MMS-4 Cadence:0.125 seconds
Stop:2016-09-14 07:59:59 Instrument:MMS 4 FIELDS Suite, Fluxgate Magnetometer (FGM) Instrument Resource:NumericalData
The Fluxgate Magnetometers (FGM) on Magnetospheric Multiscale consist of a traditional Analog Fluxgate Magnetometer (AFG) and a Digital Fluxgate magnetometer (DFG). The dual magnetometers are operated as a single instrument providing a single intercalibrated data product. Range changes occur at different times on the two instruments so the gains checked each periapsis can be carried out unambiguously to apoapsis. Cross correlation of calibration parameters can separate causes of the any apparent calibration changes. Use of Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) to determine the field along the rotation axis allows accurate monitoring of the zero levels along the rotation axis. Prior to launch the magnetometers were calibrated at the Technical University, Braunschweig, except for the AFG magnetometers on MMS3 and MMS4, which were calibrated at UCLA. Both sets of sensors are operated for the entire MMS orbit, with slow survey (8 samples per second) outside of the Region of Interest (ROI), and fast survey (16 samples per second) inside the ROI. Within the ROI, burst mode data (128 samples per second) are also acquired. A detailed description of the MMS fluxgate magnetometers, including science objectives, instrument description, calibration, magnetic cleanliness program, and data flow can be found at http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs11214-014-0057-3 (DOI 10.1007/s11214-014-0057-3). Additional information can also be found at http://www-spc.igpp.ucla.edu/ssc/mms (UCLA), and http://www.iwf.oeaw.ac.at/de/forschung/erdnaher-weltraum/mms/dfg (IWF, Graz). For the purpose of creating a unified FGM Level 2 data product, burst mode data is taken from DFG and survey mode data is taken from AFG. Because AFG and DFG are cross-calibrated on an orbit-averaged basis, small differences in offset may be observed between Level 2 burst and survey mode data. Consequently, any differences are within the error of the measurement. Based on preliminary analysis of the data, the absolute error within the Region of Interest (ROI) is estimated to be no more than 0.1 nT in the spin-plane, 0.15 nT along the spin-axis and 0.2 nT in total magnitude.

39) MMS 4 Search Coil Magnetometer (SCM) AC Magnetic Field (16384 Samples/s), Level 2, High Burst Survey maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VSPO/NumericalData/MMS/4/FIELDS/SCM/Burst/Level2/PT0.00006101515625S
Start:2015-09-01 12:11:14 Observatory:MMS-4 Cadence:0.0000610151563 seconds
Stop:2016-09-14 07:59:59 Instrument:MMS 4 FIELDS Suite, Search Coil Magnetometer (SCM) Instrument Resource:NumericalData
Search Coil Magnetometer (SCM) AC Magnetic Field (16384 samples/s), Level 2, High Burst Survey Data. The tri-axial Search-Coil Magnetometer with its associated preamplifier measures three-dimensional magnetic field fluctuations. The analog magnetic waveforms measured by the SCM are digitized and processed inside the Digital Signal Processor (DSP), collected and stored by the Central Instrument Data Processor (CIDP) via the Fields Central Electronics Box (CEB). Prior to launch, all SCM Flight models were calibrated by LPP team members at the National Magnetic Observatory, Chambon-la-Foret (Orleans). Once per orbit, each SCM transfer function is checked thanks to the onboard calibration signal provided by the DSP. The SCM is operated for the entire MMS orbit in survey mode. Within scientific Regions Of Interest (ROI), burst mode data are also acquired as well as high burst mode data. This SCM data set corresponds to the AC magnetic field waveforms in nanoTesla and in the GSE frame. The instrument paper for SCM can be found at http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11214-014-0096-9.

40) MMS 4 Search Coil Magnetometer (SCM) AC Magnetic Field (8192 Samples/s), Level 2, Burst Survey maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VSPO/NumericalData/MMS/4/FIELDS/SCM/Burst/Level2/PT0.0001220703125S
Start:2015-08-04 15:44:54 Observatory:MMS-4 Cadence:0.0001220703125 seconds
Stop:2016-09-14 07:59:59 Instrument:MMS 4 FIELDS Suite, Search Coil Magnetometer (SCM) Instrument Resource:NumericalData
Search Coil Magnetometer (SCM) AC Magnetic Field (8192 samples/s), Level 2, Burst Survey Data. The tri-axial Search-Coil Magnetometer with its associated preamplifier measures three-dimensional magnetic field fluctuations. The analog magnetic waveforms measured by the SCM are digitized and processed inside the Digital Signal Processor (DSP), collected and stored by the Central Instrument Data Processor (CIDP) via the Fields Central Electronics Box (CEB). Prior to launch, all SCM Flight models were calibrated by LPP team members at the National Magnetic Observatory, Chambon-la-Foret (Orleans). Once per orbit, each SCM transfer function is checked thanks to the onboard calibration signal provided by the DSP. The SCM is operated for the entire MMS orbit in survey mode. Within scientific Regions Of Interest (ROI), burst mode data are also acquired as well as high burst mode data. This SCM data set corresponds to the AC magnetic field waveforms in nanoTesla and in the GSE frame. The instrument paper for SCM can be found at http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11214-014-0096-9.

41) MMS 4 Search Coil Magnetometer (SCM) AC Magnetic Field (32 Samples/s), Level 2, Quick-Look Survey maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VSPO/NumericalData/MMS/4/FIELDS/SCM/Survey/Level2/PT0.03125S
Start:2015-09-02 00:00:00 Observatory:MMS-4 Cadence:0.03125 seconds
Stop:2016-09-14 07:59:59 Instrument:MMS 4 FIELDS Suite, Search Coil Magnetometer (SCM) Instrument Resource:NumericalData
Search Coil Magnetometer (SCM) AC Magnetic Field (32 samples/s), Level 2, Quick-Look Survey Data. The tri-axial Search-Coil Magnetometer with its associated preamplifier measures three-dimensional magnetic field fluctuations. The analog magnetic waveforms measured by the SCM are digitized and processed inside the Digital Signal Processor (DSP), collected and stored by the Central Instrument Data Processor (CIDP) via the Fields Central Electronics Box (CEB). Prior to launch, all SCM Flight models were calibrated by LPP team members at the National Magnetic Observatory, Chambon-la-Foret (Orleans). Once per orbit, each SCM transfer function is checked thanks to the onboard calibration signal provided by the DSP. The SCM is operated for the entire MMS orbit in survey mode. Within scientific Regions Of Interest (ROI), burst mode data are also acquired as well as high burst mode data. This SCM data set corresponds to the AC magnetic field waveforms in nanoTesla and in the GSE frame. The instrument paper for SCM can be found at http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11214-014-0096-9.

42) MMS 4 Fast Plasma Investigation, Dual Electron Spectrometer (FPI, DES) Instrument Distributions, Burst Survey maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VSPO/NumericalData/MMS/4/FastPlasmaInvestigation/DES/Burst/Level2/Distribution/PT0.03S
Start:2015-07-31 21:24:04 Observatory:MMS-4 Cadence:0.030 seconds
Stop:2016-09-14 07:59:58 Instrument:MMS 4 Fast Plasma Instrument (FPI) Suite, Dual Electron Spectrometers (DES) Instrument Resource:NumericalData
FPI usually operates in Fast Survey (FS) Mode in the MMS Region Of Interest (ROI) for the current Mission Phase. Data are taken at burst (30/150 ms for DES/DIS) resolution in this mode. Data are also made available at survey (4.5 s, etc) resolution; these form a separate product from this. Per mission design, not all burst-resolution data are downlinked. This product contains phase-space distribution maps of those burst-resolution data selected for downlink. In particular, the (highest possible quality at the time of release) corrected/converted "Burst SkyMap" distributions are reported with time-stamps and other annotation characterizing the state of the instrument system at the indicated time.

43) MMS 4 Fast Plasma Investigation, Dual Electron Spectrometer (FPI, DES) Instrument Distributions, Fast Survey maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VSPO/NumericalData/MMS/4/FastPlasmaInvestigation/DES/Burst/Level2/Distribution/PT4.5S
Start:2015-07-31 12:00:00 Observatory:MMS-4 Cadence:4.5 seconds
Stop:2016-09-14 07:59:58 Instrument:MMS 4 Fast Plasma Instrument (FPI) Suite, Dual Electron Spectrometers (DES) Instrument Resource:NumericalData
FPI usually operates in Fast Survey (FS) Mode in the MMS Region Of Interest (ROI) for the current Mission Phase. Data taken at burst (30/150 ms for DES/DIS) resolution are aggregated on board and made available at survey (4.5 s) resolution in this mode. This product contains phase-space distribution maps of results from surveying the high-resolution observations during each 4.5 s period. In particular, the (highest possible quality at the time of release) corrected/converted "Fast Survey SkyMap" distributions are reported with time-stamps and other annotation characterizing the state of the instrument system at the indicated time.

44) MMS 4 Fast Plasma Investigation, Dual Electron Spectrometer (FPI, DES) Distribution Moments, Burst Survey maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VSPO/NumericalData/MMS/4/FastPlasmaInvestigation/DES/Burst/Level2/Moments/PT0.03S
Start:2015-07-31 21:24:04 Observatory:MMS-4 Cadence:0.030 seconds
Stop:2016-09-14 07:59:59 Instrument:MMS 4 Fast Plasma Instrument (FPI) Suite, Dual Electron Spectrometers (DES) Instrument Resource:NumericalData
FPI usually operates in Fast Survey (FS) Mode in the MMS Region Of Interest (ROI) for the current Mission Phase. Data are taken at burst (30/150 ms for DES/DIS) resolution in this mode. Data are also made available at survey (4.5 s, etc) resolution. Per mission design, not all burst-resolution data are downlinked, but all survey data are downlinked. Planning around calibration activities, avoidance of Earth radiation belts, etc, when possible, FPI usually operates in Slow Survey (SS) Mode outside of ROI, and then only the 60 s resolution survey data are available. This product contains results from integrating the standard moments of phase-space distributions formed from the indicated data type (DES/DIS burst, FS or SS). For convenience, some additional parameters are included to augment those most commonly found in a moments product of this sort, plus time-stamps and other annotation characterizing the state of the instrument system at the indicated time.

45) MMS 4 Fast Plasma Investigation, Dual Electron Spectrometer (FPI, DES) Distribution Moments, Fast Survey maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VSPO/NumericalData/MMS/4/FastPlasmaInvestigation/DES/Burst/Level2/Moments/PT4.5S
Start:2015-07-31 12:00:00 Observatory:MMS-4 Cadence:4.5 seconds
Stop:2016-09-14 07:59:58 Instrument:MMS 4 Fast Plasma Instrument (FPI) Suite, Dual Electron Spectrometers (DES) Instrument Resource:NumericalData
FPI usually operates in Fast Survey (FS) Mode in the MMS Region Of Interest (ROI) for the current Mission Phase. Data are taken at survey (30/4.5 s for DES/DIS) resolution in this mode. Data are also made available at survey (4.5 s, etc) resolution. Per mission design, not all survey-resolution data are downlinked, but all survey data are downlinked. Planning around calibration activities, avoidance of Earth radiation belts, etc, when possible, FPI usually operates in Slow Survey (SS) Mode outside of ROI, and then only the 60 s resolution survey data are available. This product contains results from integrating the standard moments of phase-space distributions formed from the indicated data type (DES/DIS burst, FS or SS). For convenience, some additional parameters are included to augment those most commonly found in a moments product of this sort, plus time-stamps and other annotation characterizing the state of the instrument system at the indicated time.

46) MMS 4 Fast Plasma Investigation, Dual Ion Spectrometer (FPI, DIS) Instrument Distributions, Burst Survey maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VSPO/NumericalData/MMS/4/FastPlasmaInvestigation/DIS/Burst/Level2/Distribution/PT0.15S
Start:2015-07-31 21:24:04 Observatory:MMS-4 Cadence:0.150 seconds
Stop:2016-09-14 07:59:58 Instrument:MMS 4 Fast Plasma Instrument (FPI) Suite, Dual Ion Spectrometers (DIS) Instrument Resource:NumericalData
FPI usually operates in Fast Survey (FS) Mode in the MMS Region Of Interest (ROI) for the current Mission Phase. Data are taken at burst (30/150 ms for DES/DIS) resolution in this mode. Data are also made available at survey (4.5 s, etc) resolution; these form a separate product from this. Per mission design, not all burst-resolution data are downlinked. This product contains phase-space distribution maps of those burst-resolution data selected for downlink. In particular, the (highest possible quality at the time of release) corrected/converted "Burst SkyMap" distributions are reported with time-stamps and other annotation characterizing the state of the instrument system at the indicated time.

47) MMS 4 Fast Plasma Investigation, Dual Ion Spectrometer (FPI, DIS) Instrument Distributions, Fast Survey maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VSPO/NumericalData/MMS/4/FastPlasmaInvestigation/DIS/Burst/Level2/Distribution/PT4.5S
Start:2015-07-31 12:00:00 Observatory:MMS-4 Cadence:4.5 seconds
Stop:2016-09-14 07:59:58 Instrument:MMS 4 Fast Plasma Instrument (FPI) Suite, Dual Ion Spectrometers (DIS) Instrument Resource:NumericalData
FPI usually operates in Fast Survey (FS) Mode in the MMS Region Of Interest (ROI) for the current Mission Phase. Data taken at burst (30/150 ms for DES/DIS) resolution are aggregated on board and made available at survey (4.5 s) resolution in this mode. This product contains phase-space distribution maps of results from surveying the high-resolution observations during each 4.5 s period. In particular, the (highest possible quality at the time of release) corrected/converted "Fast Survey SkyMap" distributions are reported with time-stamps and other annotation characterizing the state of the instrument system at the indicated time.

48) MMS 4 Fast Plasma Investigation, Dual Ion Spectrometer (FPI, DIS) Distribution Moments, Burst Survey maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VSPO/NumericalData/MMS/4/FastPlasmaInvestigation/DIS/Burst/Level2/Moments/PT0.15S
Start:2015-07-31 21:24:04 Observatory:MMS-4 Cadence:0.150 seconds
Stop:2016-09-14 07:59:58 Instrument:MMS 4 Fast Plasma Instrument (FPI) Suite, Dual Ion Spectrometers (DIS) Instrument Resource:NumericalData
FPI usually operates in Fast Survey (FS) Mode in the MMS Region Of Interest (ROI) for the current Mission Phase. Data are taken at burst (30/150 ms for DES/DIS) resolution in this mode. Data are also made available at survey (4.5 s, etc) resolution. Per mission design, not all burst-resolution data are downlinked, but all survey data are downlinked. Planning around calibration activities, avoidance of Earth radiation belts, etc, when possible, FPI usually operates in Slow Survey (SS) Mode outside of ROI, and then only the 60 s resolution survey data are available. This product contains results from integrating the standard moments of phase-space distributions formed from the indicated data type (DES/DIS burst, FS or SS). For convenience, some additional parameters are included to augment those most commonly found in a moments product of this sort, plus time-stamps and other annotation characterizing the state of the instrument system at the indicated time.

49) MMS 4 Fast Plasma Investigation, Dual Ion Spectrometer (FPI, DIS) Distribution Moments, Fast Survey maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VSPO/NumericalData/MMS/4/FastPlasmaInvestigation/DIS/Burst/Level2/Moments/PT4.5S
Start:2015-07-31 12:00:00 Observatory:MMS-4 Cadence:0.150 seconds
Stop:2016-09-14 07:59:58 Instrument:MMS 4 Fast Plasma Instrument (FPI) Suite, Dual Ion Spectrometers (DIS) Instrument Resource:NumericalData
FPI usually operates in Fast Survey (FS) Mode in the MMS Region Of Interest (ROI) for the current Mission Phase. Data are taken at survey (30/4.5 s for DES/DIS) resolution in this mode. Data are also made available at survey (4.5 s, etc) resolution. Per mission design, not all survey-resolution data are downlinked, but all survey data are downlinked. Planning around calibration activities, avoidance of Earth radiation belts, etc, when possible, FPI usually operates in Slow Survey (SS) Mode outside of ROI, and then only the 60 s resolution survey data are available. This product contains results from integrating the standard moments of phase-space distributions formed from the indicated data type (DES/DIS burst, FS or SS). For convenience, some additional parameters are included to augment those most commonly found in a moments product of this sort, plus time-stamps and other annotation characterizing the state of the instrument system at the indicated time.

50) MMS 4 Hot Plasma Composition Analyzer (HPCA) Ions, Level 2, Burst Survey maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VSPO/NumericalData/MMS/4/HotPlasmaCompositionAnalyzer/Burst/Level2/Ion/PT0.625S
Start:2015-09-01 12:11:00 Observatory:MMS-4 Cadence:0.625 seconds
Stop:2016-09-14 08:00:01 Instrument:MMS 4 FIELDS Suite, Fluxgate Magnetometer (FGM) Instrument Resource:NumericalData
Hot Plasma Composition Analyzer (HPCA) Ions, Level 2, Burst Survey, 0.625 s Data. The MMS HPCA instruments measure the energy and composition of magnetospheric plasmas in the energy range from 1 eV to 40 keV. An electrostatic energy analyzer (ESA) that is optically coupled to a carbon-foil based Time-of-Flight (TOF) section comprises each HPCA. The basic HPCA data product is an array of counts for 5 ion species, at 63 energies, for each of 16 elevation anodes. Sixteen basic products, also called azimuths, are acquired every 0.625 s; half a spacecraft spin period nominally has 16 azimuths. The five ion species are protons (H+), alpha particles (He++), helium ions (He+), singly charged Oxygen (O+), and background counts.

Showing 1 - 50Next