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1) Akebono PWS NPW Data maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VWO/NumericalData/Akebono/PWS/E.NPW.PT2S
Start:1989-02-24 13:32:00 Observatory:Akebono Cadence:2 seconds
Stop:2016-05-19 13:23:48 Instrument:Plasma Wave Observation and Sounder Experiments (PWS) Resource:NumericalData
The Plasma Wave Observation and Sounder Experiment (PWS) observes both natural (NPW) and stimulated (SPW) plasma waves. The frequency range of the NPW system is 20 kHz to 5.12 MHz. These CDF data consist of Electric Field intensities measured by the PWS Recevier 1 (RX1) and Receiver 2 (RX2) units.

2) CALLISTO Solar Spectrogram FITS files maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VWO/NumericalData/CALLISTO/FAS.PT0.25S
Start:2002-09-07 12:08:00 Observatory: Cadence:
Stop:2016-05-19 13:23:49 Instrument: Resource:NumericalData
This dataset contains solar dynamic spectrogram FITS files of the CALLISTO spectrometer data from the e-Callisto network of stations. The FITS file is composed of four parts: the ASCII-format header, the binary spectrum and two BIN tables. One table is for the time axis and the other for the frequency axis. FITSvfiles contain the keyword BUNIT in the primary header. If the BUNIT = 'SFU', then data are calibrated. If the BUNIT = 'digits', then data are raw data without any calibration. The naming convention for each file is of the form: STATION_YYYYMMDD_HHMMSS_CODE.fit.gz where STATION is a variable length station name and following the Date (YYYYMMDD) and UT time (HHMMSS) CODE is a two digit number that is an individual description of the front-end of the system. From the website http://e-callisto.org - The CALLISTO spectrometer is a programmable heterodyne receiver built in the framework of IHY2007 and ISWI by former Radio and Plasma Physics Group (PI Christian Monstein) at ETH Zurich, Switzerland. The main applications are observation of solar radio bursts and rfi-monitoring for astronomical science, education and outreach. The instrument natively operates between 45 and 870 MHz using a modern, commercially available broadband cable-TV tuner CD1316 having a frequency resolution of 62.5 KHz. The data obtained from CALLISTO are FIT-files with up to 400 frequencies per sweep. The data are transferred via a RS-232 cable to a computer and saved locally. Time resolution is 0.25 sec at 200 channels per spectrum (800 pixels per second). The integration time is 1 msec and the radiometric bandwidth is about 300 KHz. The overall dynamic range is larger than 50 dB. For convenient data handling several IDL- and Python-routines were written. Many CALLISTO instruments have already been deployed, including: 5 spectrometers in India (2 in Ooty, 1 in Gauribidanur, 1 in Pune, 1 in Ahmedabad), one in Badary near Irkutsk, Russian Federation, two in South Korea, three in Australia (Perth, Melbourne and Heathcote), two in Hawaii, two in Mexico, one in Costa Rica, two in Brazil, three in Mauritius, four in Ireland, one in Czech Republic, two in Mongolia, four in Germany, two in Alaska, two in Kazakhstan, one in Cairo, one in Nairobi, one in Sri Lanka, three in Trieste, one in Hurbanovo/Slovakia, two in Belgium, two in Finland, 8 in Switzerland, one in Sardinia, two in Spain, 5 in Malaysia, two in Indonesia, one in Scotland/UK one in Roztoky/Slovakia, one in Peru, one in Rwanda, one in Pakistan, one in Denmark, one in Japan and one in South Africa. Through the IHY/UNBSSI and ISWI instrument deployment program, CALLISTO is able to continuously observe the solar radio spectrum for 24h per day through all the year. All Callisto spectrometers together form the e-Callisto network. Callisto in addition is dedicated to do radio-monitoring within its frequency range with 13,200 channels per spectrum. The frequency range can be expanded to any range by switching-in a heterodyne up- or a down-converter. Instrument deployment including education and training of observers was financially supported by SNF, SSAA, NASA, Institute for Astronomy and North-South Center of ETH Zurich and a few private sponsors.

3) CRRES Plasma Wave Experiment Survey Dynamic Spectrogram Plots maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VWO/DisplayData/CRRES/PWE/SFR.SA/Survey.DS.PT10H
Start:1990-08-01 17:35:00 Observatory: Cadence:8 seconds
Stop:1991-10-12 00:45:00 Instrument: Resource:DisplayData
This dataset contains one-orbit duration dynamic spectrogram GIF plots of the CRRES/Plasma Wave Experiment Sweep Frequency Receiver and Multichannel Spectrum Analyzer (electric antenna). CRRES was launched on July 25, 1990, into a geosynchronous transfer orbit with perigee altitude of 350 km and an apogee 6.3Re (Earth radii) geocentric. The inclination was 18.2 deg, the orbital period was 9 h and 52 min, and the initial magnetic local time at apogee was 0800 MLT. The plasma wave experiment measures the electromagnetic and/or electrostatic fields detected by three sensors: 1) a 100 m tip-to-tip extendable fine wire long electric dipole antenna (designated WADA for wire antenna deployment assembly), 2) a search coil magnetometer mounted at the end of a 6-m boom, and 3) a 94-m sphere-to-sphere double probe electric antenna (designated SWDA for spherical-double-probe wire deployment assembly) which is part of the EF/LP experiment. The first two sensors are the primary sensors for the plasma wave experiment whereas the third sensor is the primary sensor for EF/LP experiment. Following the antenna extensions, the spacecraft was spun down to approximately 2 rpm. The normal mode of operation for the plasma wave experiment after the antenna extensions has been to have the sweep frequency receiver locked onto the WADA antenna and the multichannel analyzer cycling through all three antennas. The basic CRRES plasma wave experiment instrumentation includes two receivers: 1) a multichannel spectrum analyzer to provide high-time-resolution spectra from 5.6 Hz to 10kHz, and 2) a sweep frequency receiver for high-frequency- resolution spectrum measurements from 100 Hz to 400 kHz. Each plot shows a plasma wave spectrogram for a one orbit (roughly 10 hour) period. The spectrograms cover the frequency range from 5.6 Hz to 400 kHz presented on a logarithmic scale. The data from 5.6-100 Hz are the measurements from the multichannel spectrum analyzer during the portions of its cycling when it is connected to the WADA antenna. Additional marks along the frequency axis indicate the boundaries between bands on the sweep frequency receiver. Band 1 extends from 100 to 800 Hz, Band 2 from 800 to 6.4 kHz, Band 3 from 6.4 to 50 kHz and Band 4 from 50 to 400 kHz. The intensity of the waves are color-coded and are in units of db(V/m/root(Hz)). The red line superimposed on each plot shows the electron cyclotron frequency calculated from the fluxgate magnetometer experiment. The time resolution above 6.4 kHz is one spectrum every 8s. The striations apparent in some emissions are a result of the beating between the spin rate and the sampling rate. Across the top of the figure is "CRRES SFR/SA" for the CRRES Plasma Wave Experiment Sweep Frequency Receiver and Multichannel Spectrum Analyzer, the units of the color scale is provided as well as the color bar with maximum and minimum values. Beneath the time axis is CRRES orbital information: Radial distance in Earth radii, Magnetic Latitude, Magnetic Local Time and L-shell. Along the left edge of the figure is the orbit number followed by the date. Along the right edge of the figure is "The University of Iowa/AFGL", the name of the software package used to create the plots and the date and time in which the plot was created.

4) Callisto Quicklook Solar Spectrogram Plots maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VWO/DisplayData/Callisto/FAS.PT15M
Start:2002-09-07 12:08:00 Observatory: Cadence:
Stop:2016-05-19 13:23:47 Instrument: Resource:DisplayData
This dataset contains solar dynamic spectrogram PNG plots of the Callisto spectrometer data from the e-Callisto network of stations. Each plot spans 15 minutes. The naming convention for each file is of the form: STATION_YYYYMMDD_HHMMSS_CODE.fit.gz.png where STATION is a variable length station name and following the Date (YYYYMMDD) and UT time (HHMMSS) CODE is a two digit number that is an individual description of the front-end of the system. From the website http://e-callisto.org - The CALLISTO spectrometer is a programmable heterodyne receiver built in the framework of IHY2007 and ISWI by former Radio and Plasma Physics Group (PI Christian Monstein) at ETH Zurich, Switzerland. The main applications are observation of solar radio bursts and rfi-monitoring for astronomical science, education and outreach. The instrument natively operates between 45 and 870 MHz using a modern, commercially available broadband cable-TV tuner CD1316 having a frequency resolution of 62.5 KHz. The data obtained from CALLISTO are FIT-files with up to 400 frequencies per sweep. The data are transferred via a RS-232 cable to a computer and saved locally. Time resolution is 0.25 sec at 200 channels per spectrum (800 pixels per second). The integration time is 1 msec and the radiometric bandwidth is about 300 KHz. The overall dynamic range is larger than 50 dB. For convenient data handling several IDL- and Python-routines were written. Many CALLISTO instruments have already been deployed, including: 5 spectrometers in India (2 in Ooty, 1 in Gauribidanur, 1 in Pune, 1 in Ahmedabad), one in Badary near Irkutsk, Russian Federation, two in South Korea, three in Australia (Perth, Melbourne and Heathcote), two in Hawaii, two in Mexico, one in Costa Rica, two in Brazil, three in Mauritius, four in Ireland, one in Czech Republic, two in Mongolia, four in Germany, two in Alaska, two in Kazakhstan, one in Cairo, one in Nairobi, one in Sri Lanka, three in Trieste, one in Hurbanovo/Slovakia, two in Belgium, two in Finland, 8 in Switzerland, one in Sardinia, two in Spain, 5 in Malaysia, two in Indonesia, one in Scotland/UK one in Roztoky/Slovakia, one in Peru, one in Rwanda, one in Pakistan, one in Denmark, one in Japan and one in South Africa. Through the IHY/UNBSSI and ISWI instrument deployment program, CALLISTO is able to continuously observe the solar radio spectrum for 24h per day through all the year. All Callisto spectrometers together form the e-Callisto network. Callisto in addition is dedicated to do radio-monitoring within its frequency range with 13,200 channels per spectrum. The frequency range can be expanded to any range by switching-in a heterodyne up- or a down-converter. Instrument deployment including education and training of observers was financially supported by SNF, SSAA, NASA, Institute for Astronomy and North-South Center of ETH Zurich and a few private sponsors.

5) Cluster 1 Wideband Data Plasma Wave Receiver/High Time Resolution Waveform Data maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VWO/NumericalData/Cluster-Rumba/WBD/PT0.0000046S
Start:2001-02-03 05:26:00 Observatory:Cluster FM5 (Rumba) Cadence:0.0000046 seconds
Stop:2016-05-19 13:23:49 Instrument:Wide Band Data (WBD) Resource:NumericalData
The following description applies to the Wideband Data (WBD) Plasma Wave Receivers on all four Cluster satellites, each satellite being uniquely identified by its number (1 through 4) or its given name (Rumba, Salsa, Samba, Tango, respectively). High time resolution calibrated waveform data sampled in one of 3 frequency bands in the range 0-577 kHz along one axis using either an electric field antenna or a magnetic search coil sensor. The dataset also includes instrument mode, data quality and the angles required to orient the measurement with respect to the magnetic field and to the GSE coordinate system. The AC electric field data are obtained by using one of the two 88m spin plane electric field antennas of the EFW (Electric Fields and Waves) instrument as a sensor. The AC magnetic field data are obtained by using one of the two search coil magnetometers (one in the spin plane, the other along the spin axis) of the STAFF (Spatio-Temporal Analysis of Field Fluctuations) instrument as a sensor. The WBD data are obtained in one of three filter bandwidth modes: (1) 9.5 kHz, (2) 19 kHz, or (3) 77 kHz. The minimum frequency of each of these three frequency bands can be shifted up (converted) from the default 0 kHz base frequency by 125.454, 250.908 or 501.816 kHz. The time resolution of the data shown in the plots is determined from the WBD instrument mode. The highest time resolution data (generally the 77 kHz bandwidth mode) are sampled at 4.6 microseconds in the time domain (~4.7 milliseconds in the frequency domain using a standard 1024 point FFT). The lowest time resolution data (generally the 9.5 kHz bandwidth mode) are sampled at 36.5 microseconds in the time domain (~37.3 milliseconds in the frequency domain using a standard 1024 point FFT). The availability of these files depends on times of DSN and Panska Ves ground station telemetry downlinks. A list of the status of the WBD instrument on each spacecraft, the telemetry time spans, operating modes and other details are available under Science Data Availability on the University of Iowa Cluster WBD web site at http://www- pw.physics.uiowa.edu/cluster/ and through the documentation section of the Cluster Active Archive (CAA) (http://caa.estec.esa.int/caa). Details on Cluster WBD Interpretation Issues and Caveats can be found at http://www- pw.physics.uiowa.edu/cluster/ by clicking on the links next to the Caution symbol in the listing on the left side of the web site. These documents are also available from the Documentation section of the CAA website. For further details on the Cluster WBD data products see Pickett, J.S., et al., "Cluster Wideband Data Products in the Cluster Active Archive" in _The Cluster Active Archive_, 2010, Springer-Verlag, pp 169-183, and the Cluster WBD User Guide archived at the CAA website in the Documentation section. ... CALIBRATION: ... The procedure used in computing the calibrated Electric Field and Magnetic Field values found in this file can be obtained from the Cluster WBD Calibration Report archived at the CAA website in the Documentation section. Because the calibration was applied in the time domain using simple equations the raw counts actually measured by the WBD instrument can be obtained by using these equations and solving for 'Raw Counts', keeping in mind that this number is an Integer ranging from 0 to 255. Since DC offset is a real number, the resultant when solving for raw counts will need to be converted to the nearest whole number. A sample IDL routine for reverse calibrating to obtain 'Raw Counts' is provided in the WBD Calibration Report archived at the CAA. ... CONVERSION TO FREQUENCY DOMAIN: ... In order to convert the WBD data to the frequency domain via an FFT, the following steps need to be carried out: 1) If Electric Field, first divide calibrated data values by 1000 to get V/m; 2) Apply window of preference, if any (such as Hann, etc.); 3) Divide data values by sqrt(2) to get back to the rms domain; 4) perform FFT (see Bandwidth variable notes for non-continuous modes and/or the WBD User Guide archived at the CAA); 5) divide by the noise bandwidth, which is equal to the sampling frequency divided by the FFT size (see table below for appropriate sampling frequency); 6) multiply by the appropriate constant for the window used, if any. These steps are more fully explained in the WBD Calibration Report archived at the CAA.... +--------------------------+ | Bandwidth | Sample Rate | |-----------|--------------| | 9.5 kHz | 27.443 kHz | | 19 kHz | 54.886 kHz | | 77 kHz | 219.544 kHz | +--------------------------+ COORDINATE SYSTEM USED: ... One axis measurements made in the Antenna Coordinate System, i.e., if electric field measurement, it will either be Ey or Ez, both of which are in the spin plane of the spacecraft, and if magnetic field measurement, it will either be Bx, along the spin axis, or By, in spin plane. The user of WBD data should refer to the WBD User Guide, archived at the CAA, Section 5.4.1 and Figure 5.3 for a description of the three orientation angles provided in these files. Since WBD measurements are made along one axis only, these three angles provide the only means for orienting the WBD measurements with respect to a geocentric coordinate system and to the magnetic field direction ...

6) Cluster 1 WHISPER Natural Electric Power Spectral Density maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VWO/NumericalData/Cluster-Rumba/WHISPER/PT2S
Start:2000-08-16 12:39:00 Observatory:Cluster FM5 (Rumba) Cadence:2.14 seconds
Stop:2016-05-19 13:23:49 Instrument:Waves of HF and Sounder for Probing Electron Density by Relaxation (WHISPER) Resource:NumericalData
The Waves of HIgh frequency and Sounder for Probing of Electron density by Relaxation (WHISPER) performs the measurement of the electron density on the four satellites of the Cluster project. The two main purposes of the WHISPER experiment are to record the natural waves and to make a diagnostic of the electron density using the sounding technique. The various working modes and the fourier transforms calculated on board provide a good frequency resolution obtained in the bandwidth 2-83 kHz. Onboard data compression by the Digital Wave Processing (DWP) intrument allows a good dynamic and level resolution of the electric signal amplitude.

7) Cluster 1 WHISPER Active Electric Power Spectral Density maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VWO/NumericalData/Cluster-Rumba/WHISPER/PT52S
Start:2000-08-16 12:39:00 Observatory:Cluster FM5 (Rumba) Cadence:52 seconds
Stop:2016-05-19 13:23:49 Instrument:Waves of HF and Sounder for Probing Electron Density by Relaxation (WHISPER) Resource:NumericalData
The Waves of HIgh frequency and Sounder for Probing of Electron density by Relaxation (WHISPER) performs the measurement of the electron density on the four satellites of the Cluster project. The two main purposes of the WHISPER experiment are to record the natural waves and to make a diagnostic of the electron density using the sounding technique. The various working modes and the fourier transforms calculated on board provide a good frequency resolution obtained in the bandwidth 2-83 kHz. Onboard data compression by the Digital Wave Processing (DWP) intrument allows a good dynamic and level resolution of the electric signal amplitude.

8) Cluster 2 Wideband Data Plasma Wave Receiver/High Time Resolution Waveform Data maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VWO/NumericalData/Cluster-Salsa/WBD/PT0.0000046S
Start:2001-02-03 05:26:00 Observatory:Cluster FM6 (Salsa) Cadence:0.0000046 seconds
Stop:2016-05-19 13:23:48 Instrument:Wide Band Data (WBD) Resource:NumericalData
The following description applies to the Wideband Data (WBD) Plasma Wave Receivers on all four Cluster satellites, each satellite being uniquely identified by its number (1 through 4) or its given name (Rumba, Salsa, Samba, Tango, respectively). High time resolution calibrated waveform data sampled in one of 3 frequency bands in the range 0-577 kHz along one axis using either an electric field antenna or a magnetic search coil sensor. The dataset also includes instrument mode, data quality and the angles required to orient the measurement with respect to the magnetic field and to the GSE coordinate system. The AC electric field data are obtained by using one of the two 88m spin plane electric field antennas of the EFW (Electric Fields and Waves) instrument as a sensor. The AC magnetic field data are obtained by using one of the two search coil magnetometers (one in the spin plane, the other along the spin axis) of the STAFF (Spatio-Temporal Analysis of Field Fluctuations) instrument as a sensor. The WBD data are obtained in one of three filter bandwidth modes: (1) 9.5 kHz, (2) 19 kHz, or (3) 77 kHz. The minimum frequency of each of these three frequency bands can be shifted up (converted) from the default 0 kHz base frequency by 125.454, 250.908 or 501.816 kHz. The time resolution of the data shown in the plots is determined from the WBD instrument mode. The highest time resolution data (generally the 77 kHz bandwidth mode) are sampled at 4.6 microseconds in the time domain (~4.7 milliseconds in the frequency domain using a standard 1024 point FFT). The lowest time resolution data (generally the 9.5 kHz bandwidth mode) are sampled at 36.5 microseconds in the time domain (~37.3 milliseconds in the frequency domain using a standard 1024 point FFT). The availability of these files depends on times of DSN and Panska Ves ground station telemetry downlinks. A list of the status of the WBD instrument on each spacecraft, the telemetry time spans, operating modes and other details are available under Science Data Availability on the University of Iowa Cluster WBD web site at http://www- pw.physics.uiowa.edu/cluster/ and through the documentation section of the Cluster Active Archive (CAA) (http://caa.estec.esa.int/caa). Details on Cluster WBD Interpretation Issues and Caveats can be found at http://www- pw.physics.uiowa.edu/cluster/ by clicking on the links next to the Caution symbol in the listing on the left side of the web site. These documents are also available from the Documentation section of the CAA website. For further details on the Cluster WBD data products see Pickett, J.S., et al., "Cluster Wideband Data Products in the Cluster Active Archive" in _The Cluster Active Archive_, 2010, Springer-Verlag, pp 169-183, and the Cluster WBD User Guide archived at the CAA website in the Documentation section. ... CALIBRATION: ... The procedure used in computing the calibrated Electric Field and Magnetic Field values found in this file can be obtained from the Cluster WBD Calibration Report archived at the CAA website in the Documentation section. Because the calibration was applied in the time domain using simple equations the raw counts actually measured by the WBD instrument can be obtained by using these equations and solving for 'Raw Counts', keeping in mind that this number is an Integer ranging from 0 to 255. Since DC offset is a real number, the resultant when solving for raw counts will need to be converted to the nearest whole number. A sample IDL routine for reverse calibrating to obtain 'Raw Counts' is provided in the WBD Calibration Report archived at the CAA. ... CONVERSION TO FREQUENCY DOMAIN: ... In order to convert the WBD data to the frequency domain via an FFT, the following steps need to be carried out: 1) If Electric Field, first divide calibrated data values by 1000 to get V/m; 2) Apply window of preference, if any (such as Hann, etc.); 3) Divide data values by sqrt(2) to get back to the rms domain; 4) perform FFT (see Bandwidth variable notes for non-continuous modes and/or the WBD User Guide archived at the CAA); 5) divide by the noise bandwidth, which is equal to the sampling frequency divided by the FFT size (see table below for appropriate sampling frequency); 6) multiply by the appropriate constant for the window used, if any. These steps are more fully explained in the WBD Calibration Report archived at the CAA.... +--------------------------+ | Bandwidth | Sample Rate | |-----------|--------------| | 9.5 kHz | 27.443 kHz | | 19 kHz | 54.886 kHz | | 77 kHz | 219.544 kHz | +--------------------------+ COORDINATE SYSTEM USED: ... One axis measurements made in the Antenna Coordinate System, i.e., if electric field measurement, it will either be Ey or Ez, both of which are in the spin plane of the spacecraft, and if magnetic field measurement, it will either be Bx, along the spin axis, or By, in spin plane. The user of WBD data should refer to the WBD User Guide, archived at the CAA, Section 5.4.1 and Figure 5.3 for a description of the three orientation angles provided in these files. Since WBD measurements are made along one axis only, these three angles provide the only means for orienting the WBD measurements with respect to a geocentric coordinate system and to the magnetic field direction ...

9) Cluster 2 WHISPER Natural Electric Power Spectral Density maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VWO/NumericalData/Cluster-Salsa/WHISPER/PT2S
Start:2000-08-16 12:39:00 Observatory:Cluster FM6 (Salsa) Cadence:2.14 seconds
Stop:2016-05-19 13:23:48 Instrument:Waves of HF and Sounder for Probing Electron Density by Relaxation (WHISPER) Resource:NumericalData
The Waves of HIgh frequency and Sounder for Probing of Electron density by Relaxation (WHISPER) performs the measurement of the electron density on the four satellites of the Cluster project. The two main purposes of the WHISPER experiment are to record the natural waves and to make a diagnostic of the electron density using the sounding technique. The various working modes and the fourier transforms calculated on board provide a good frequency resolution obtained in the bandwidth 2-83 kHz. Onboard data compression by the Digital Wave Processing (DWP) intrument allows a good dynamic and level resolution of the electric signal amplitude.

10) Cluster 2 WHISPER Active Electric Power Spectral Density maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VWO/NumericalData/Cluster-Salsa/WHISPER/PT52S
Start:2000-08-16 12:39:00 Observatory:Cluster FM6 (Salsa) Cadence:52 seconds
Stop:2016-05-19 13:23:48 Instrument:Waves of HF and Sounder for Probing Electron Density by Relaxation (WHISPER) Resource:NumericalData
The Waves of HIgh frequency and Sounder for Probing of Electron density by Relaxation (WHISPER) performs the measurement of the electron density on the four satellites of the Cluster project. The two main purposes of the WHISPER experiment are to record the natural waves and to make a diagnostic of the electron density using the sounding technique. The various working modes and the fourier transforms calculated on board provide a good frequency resolution obtained in the bandwidth 2-83 kHz. Onboard data compression by the Digital Wave Processing (DWP) intrument allows a good dynamic and level resolution of the electric signal amplitude.

11) Cluster 3 Wideband Data Plasma Wave Receiver/High Time Resolution Waveform Data maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VWO/NumericalData/Cluster-Samba/WBD/PT0.0000046S
Start:2001-02-03 05:26:00 Observatory:Cluster FM7 (Samba) Cadence:0.0000046 seconds
Stop:2016-05-19 13:23:49 Instrument:Wide Band Data (WBD) Resource:NumericalData
The following description applies to the Wideband Data (WBD) Plasma Wave Receivers on all four Cluster satellites, each satellite being uniquely identified by its number (1 through 4) or its given name (Rumba, Salsa, Samba, Tango, respectively). High time resolution calibrated waveform data sampled in one of 3 frequency bands in the range 0-577 kHz along one axis using either an electric field antenna or a magnetic search coil sensor. The dataset also includes instrument mode, data quality and the angles required to orient the measurement with respect to the magnetic field and to the GSE coordinate system. The AC electric field data are obtained by using one of the two 88m spin plane electric field antennas of the EFW (Electric Fields and Waves) instrument as a sensor. The AC magnetic field data are obtained by using one of the two search coil magnetometers (one in the spin plane, the other along the spin axis) of the STAFF (Spatio-Temporal Analysis of Field Fluctuations) instrument as a sensor. The WBD data are obtained in one of three filter bandwidth modes: (1) 9.5 kHz, (2) 19 kHz, or (3) 77 kHz. The minimum frequency of each of these three frequency bands can be shifted up (converted) from the default 0 kHz base frequency by 125.454, 250.908 or 501.816 kHz. The time resolution of the data shown in the plots is determined from the WBD instrument mode. The highest time resolution data (generally the 77 kHz bandwidth mode) are sampled at 4.6 microseconds in the time domain (~4.7 milliseconds in the frequency domain using a standard 1024 point FFT). The lowest time resolution data (generally the 9.5 kHz bandwidth mode) are sampled at 36.5 microseconds in the time domain (~37.3 milliseconds in the frequency domain using a standard 1024 point FFT). The availability of these files depends on times of DSN and Panska Ves ground station telemetry downlinks. A list of the status of the WBD instrument on each spacecraft, the telemetry time spans, operating modes and other details are available under Science Data Availability on the University of Iowa Cluster WBD web site at http://www- pw.physics.uiowa.edu/cluster/ and through the documentation section of the Cluster Active Archive (CAA) (http://caa.estec.esa.int/caa). Details on Cluster WBD Interpretation Issues and Caveats can be found at http://www- pw.physics.uiowa.edu/cluster/ by clicking on the links next to the Caution symbol in the listing on the left side of the web site. These documents are also available from the Documentation section of the CAA website. For further details on the Cluster WBD data products see Pickett, J.S., et al., "Cluster Wideband Data Products in the Cluster Active Archive" in _The Cluster Active Archive_, 2010, Springer-Verlag, pp 169-183, and the Cluster WBD User Guide archived at the CAA website in the Documentation section. ... CALIBRATION: ... The procedure used in computing the calibrated Electric Field and Magnetic Field values found in this file can be obtained from the Cluster WBD Calibration Report archived at the CAA website in the Documentation section. Because the calibration was applied in the time domain using simple equations the raw counts actually measured by the WBD instrument can be obtained by using these equations and solving for 'Raw Counts', keeping in mind that this number is an Integer ranging from 0 to 255. Since DC offset is a real number, the resultant when solving for raw counts will need to be converted to the nearest whole number. A sample IDL routine for reverse calibrating to obtain 'Raw Counts' is provided in the WBD Calibration Report archived at the CAA. ... CONVERSION TO FREQUENCY DOMAIN: ... In order to convert the WBD data to the frequency domain via an FFT, the following steps need to be carried out: 1) If Electric Field, first divide calibrated data values by 1000 to get V/m; 2) Apply window of preference, if any (such as Hann, etc.); 3) Divide data values by sqrt(2) to get back to the rms domain; 4) perform FFT (see Bandwidth variable notes for non-continuous modes and/or the WBD User Guide archived at the CAA); 5) divide by the noise bandwidth, which is equal to the sampling frequency divided by the FFT size (see table below for appropriate sampling frequency); 6) multiply by the appropriate constant for the window used, if any. These steps are more fully explained in the WBD Calibration Report archived at the CAA.... +--------------------------+ | Bandwidth | Sample Rate | |-----------|--------------| | 9.5 kHz | 27.443 kHz | | 19 kHz | 54.886 kHz | | 77 kHz | 219.544 kHz | +--------------------------+ COORDINATE SYSTEM USED: ... One axis measurements made in the Antenna Coordinate System, i.e., if electric field measurement, it will either be Ey or Ez, both of which are in the spin plane of the spacecraft, and if magnetic field measurement, it will either be Bx, along the spin axis, or By, in spin plane. The user of WBD data should refer to the WBD User Guide, archived at the CAA, Section 5.4.1 and Figure 5.3 for a description of the three orientation angles provided in these files. Since WBD measurements are made along one axis only, these three angles provide the only means for orienting the WBD measurements with respect to a geocentric coordinate system and to the magnetic field direction ...

12) Cluster 3 WHISPER Natural Electric Power Spectral Density maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VWO/NumericalData/Cluster-Samba/WHISPER/PT2S
Start:2000-08-16 12:39:00 Observatory:Cluster FM7 (Samba) Cadence:2.14 seconds
Stop:2016-05-19 13:23:49 Instrument:Waves of HF and Sounder for Probing Electron Density by Relaxation (WHISPER) Resource:NumericalData
The Waves of HIgh frequency and Sounder for Probing of Electron density by Relaxation (WHISPER) performs the measurement of the electron density on the four satellites of the Cluster project. The two main purposes of the WHISPER experiment are to record the natural waves and to make a diagnostic of the electron density using the sounding technique. The various working modes and the fourier transforms calculated on board provide a good frequency resolution obtained in the bandwidth 2-83 kHz. Onboard data compression by the Digital Wave Processing (DWP) intrument allows a good dynamic and level resolution of the electric signal amplitude.

13) Cluster 3 WHISPER Active Electric Power Spectral Density maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VWO/NumericalData/Cluster-Samba/WHISPER/PT52S
Start:2000-08-16 12:39:00 Observatory:Cluster FM7 (Samba) Cadence:52 seconds
Stop:2016-05-19 13:23:49 Instrument:Waves of HF and Sounder for Probing Electron Density by Relaxation (WHISPER) Resource:NumericalData
The Waves of HIgh frequency and Sounder for Probing of Electron density by Relaxation (WHISPER) performs the measurement of the electron density on the four satellites of the Cluster project. The two main purposes of the WHISPER experiment are to record the natural waves and to make a diagnostic of the electron density using the sounding technique. The various working modes and the fourier transforms calculated on board provide a good frequency resolution obtained in the bandwidth 2-83 kHz. Onboard data compression by the Digital Wave Processing (DWP) intrument allows a good dynamic and level resolution of the electric signal amplitude.

14) Cluster 4 Wideband Data Plasma Wave Receiver/High Time Resolution Waveform Data maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VWO/NumericalData/Cluster-Tango/WBD/PT0.0000046S
Start:2001-02-03 05:26:00 Observatory:Cluster FM8 (Tango) Cadence:0.0000046 seconds
Stop:2016-05-19 13:23:48 Instrument:Wide Band Data (WBD) Resource:NumericalData
The following description applies to the Wideband Data (WBD) Plasma Wave Receivers on all four Cluster satellites, each satellite being uniquely identified by its number (1 through 4) or its given name (Rumba, Salsa, Samba, Tango, respectively). High time resolution calibrated waveform data sampled in one of 3 frequency bands in the range 0-577 kHz along one axis using either an electric field antenna or a magnetic search coil sensor. The dataset also includes instrument mode, data quality and the angles required to orient the measurement with respect to the magnetic field and to the GSE coordinate system. The AC electric field data are obtained by using one of the two 88m spin plane electric field antennas of the EFW (Electric Fields and Waves) instrument as a sensor. The AC magnetic field data are obtained by using one of the two search coil magnetometers (one in the spin plane, the other along the spin axis) of the STAFF (Spatio-Temporal Analysis of Field Fluctuations) instrument as a sensor. The WBD data are obtained in one of three filter bandwidth modes: (1) 9.5 kHz, (2) 19 kHz, or (3) 77 kHz. The minimum frequency of each of these three frequency bands can be shifted up (converted) from the default 0 kHz base frequency by 125.454, 250.908 or 501.816 kHz. The time resolution of the data shown in the plots is determined from the WBD instrument mode. The highest time resolution data (generally the 77 kHz bandwidth mode) are sampled at 4.6 microseconds in the time domain (~4.7 milliseconds in the frequency domain using a standard 1024 point FFT). The lowest time resolution data (generally the 9.5 kHz bandwidth mode) are sampled at 36.5 microseconds in the time domain (~37.3 milliseconds in the frequency domain using a standard 1024 point FFT). The availability of these files depends on times of DSN and Panska Ves ground station telemetry downlinks. A list of the status of the WBD instrument on each spacecraft, the telemetry time spans, operating modes and other details are available under Science Data Availability on the University of Iowa Cluster WBD web site at http://www- pw.physics.uiowa.edu/cluster/ and through the documentation section of the Cluster Active Archive (CAA) (http://caa.estec.esa.int/caa). Details on Cluster WBD Interpretation Issues and Caveats can be found at http://www- pw.physics.uiowa.edu/cluster/ by clicking on the links next to the Caution symbol in the listing on the left side of the web site. These documents are also available from the Documentation section of the CAA website. For further details on the Cluster WBD data products see Pickett, J.S., et al., "Cluster Wideband Data Products in the Cluster Active Archive" in _The Cluster Active Archive_, 2010, Springer-Verlag, pp 169-183, and the Cluster WBD User Guide archived at the CAA website in the Documentation section. ... CALIBRATION: ... The procedure used in computing the calibrated Electric Field and Magnetic Field values found in this file can be obtained from the Cluster WBD Calibration Report archived at the CAA website in the Documentation section. Because the calibration was applied in the time domain using simple equations the raw counts actually measured by the WBD instrument can be obtained by using these equations and solving for 'Raw Counts', keeping in mind that this number is an Integer ranging from 0 to 255. Since DC offset is a real number, the resultant when solving for raw counts will need to be converted to the nearest whole number. A sample IDL routine for reverse calibrating to obtain 'Raw Counts' is provided in the WBD Calibration Report archived at the CAA. ... CONVERSION TO FREQUENCY DOMAIN: ... In order to convert the WBD data to the frequency domain via an FFT, the following steps need to be carried out: 1) If Electric Field, first divide calibrated data values by 1000 to get V/m; 2) Apply window of preference, if any (such as Hann, etc.); 3) Divide data values by sqrt(2) to get back to the rms domain; 4) perform FFT (see Bandwidth variable notes for non-continuous modes and/or the WBD User Guide archived at the CAA); 5) divide by the noise bandwidth, which is equal to the sampling frequency divided by the FFT size (see table below for appropriate sampling frequency); 6) multiply by the appropriate constant for the window used, if any. These steps are more fully explained in the WBD Calibration Report archived at the CAA.... +--------------------------+ | Bandwidth | Sample Rate | |-----------|--------------| | 9.5 kHz | 27.443 kHz | | 19 kHz | 54.886 kHz | | 77 kHz | 219.544 kHz | +--------------------------+ COORDINATE SYSTEM USED: ... One axis measurements made in the Antenna Coordinate System, i.e., if electric field measurement, it will either be Ey or Ez, both of which are in the spin plane of the spacecraft, and if magnetic field measurement, it will either be Bx, along the spin axis, or By, in spin plane. The user of WBD data should refer to the WBD User Guide, archived at the CAA, Section 5.4.1 and Figure 5.3 for a description of the three orientation angles provided in these files. Since WBD measurements are made along one axis only, these three angles provide the only means for orienting the WBD measurements with respect to a geocentric coordinate system and to the magnetic field direction ...

15) Cluster 4 WHISPER Natural Electric Power Spectral Density maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VWO/NumericalData/Cluster-Tango/WHISPER/PT2S
Start:2000-08-16 12:39:00 Observatory:Cluster FM8 (Tango) Cadence:2.14 seconds
Stop:2016-05-19 13:23:48 Instrument:Waves of HF and Sounder for Probing Electron Density by Relaxation (WHISPER) Resource:NumericalData
The Waves of HIgh frequency and Sounder for Probing of Electron density by Relaxation (WHISPER) performs the measurement of the electron density on the four satellites of the Cluster project. The two main purposes of the WHISPER experiment are to record the natural waves and to make a diagnostic of the electron density using the sounding technique. The various working modes and the fourier transforms calculated on board provide a good frequency resolution obtained in the bandwidth 2-83 kHz. Onboard data compression by the Digital Wave Processing (DWP) intrument allows a good dynamic and level resolution of the electric signal amplitude.

16) Cluster 4 WHISPER Active Electric Power Spectral Density maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VWO/NumericalData/Cluster-Tango/WHISPER/PT52S
Start:2000-08-16 12:39:00 Observatory:Cluster FM8 (Tango) Cadence:52 seconds
Stop:2016-05-19 13:23:48 Instrument:Waves of HF and Sounder for Probing Electron Density by Relaxation (WHISPER) Resource:NumericalData
The Waves of HIgh frequency and Sounder for Probing of Electron density by Relaxation (WHISPER) performs the measurement of the electron density on the four satellites of the Cluster project. The two main purposes of the WHISPER experiment are to record the natural waves and to make a diagnostic of the electron density using the sounding technique. The various working modes and the fourier transforms calculated on board provide a good frequency resolution obtained in the bandwidth 2-83 kHz. Onboard data compression by the Digital Wave Processing (DWP) intrument allows a good dynamic and level resolution of the electric signal amplitude.

17) Cluster WHISPER Combined Daily Dynamic Spectrograms maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VWO/DisplayData/Cluster/WHISPER/DS.JPG.P1D
Start:2001-01-01 00:00:00 Observatory:Cluster FM5 (Rumba) Cadence:
Stop:2013-12-31 23:59:59 Instrument:Waves of HF and Sounder for Probing Electron Density by Relaxation (WHISPER) Resource:DisplayData
These WHISPER daily dynamic spectrograms from each of the four Cluster spacecraft are plots of the received signal (the color scale indicates the voltage spectral density as Vrms Hz^-1/2) as a function of receiver frequency (on vertical axis) and time (horizontal axis). At the top of the image is the name of the instrument and date and above each plot the overflow status is indicated by a color code. Each spectrogram spans a frequency range from 2 through 80 kHz. Beneath the time labels on the horizontal axis are ephemeris data: position of the spacecraft in radial distance (Earth radii), latitude, and local time (GSE coordinates). The plots include data when the instruments are operating in both passive and active mode.

18) Australian Space Weather Services Culgoora Observatory Spectrograms maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VWO/DisplayData/Culgoora/DS.GIF.PT12H
Start:1992-11-14 20:12:33 Observatory:Culgoora Cadence:
Stop:2016-05-19 13:23:47 Instrument:Culgoora Solar Radiospectrograph Resource:DisplayData
Culgoora and Learmonth Observatories dynamic spectrogram plots display frequency in MHz on the vertical axis and time in UT on the horizontal axis. Each plot spans local daylight hours with time resolution of 3 seconds. The frequency range is 18 - 1800 MHz for Culgoora spectrogams and 25 - 180 MHz for Learmonth spectrograms. The intensity values are color coded and are expressed as relative logarithmic units (0 to 255). The Culgoora spectrograms consist of 4 frequency bands: 18-57, 57-180, 180-570 570 -1800 MHz and Learmonth has 2 bands: 25-75, 75-180 MHz. The two Learmonth bands are each divided into 400 frequency steps. Culgoora spectrograph data is available since November 1992, Learmonth data since June 2000.

19) Dynamics Explorer 1 Plasma Wave Instrument Step Frequency and Low Frequency Correlator Spectrogram Plots maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VWO/DisplayData/DynamicsExplorer1/PWI/SFC.LFC.PT409M
Start:1981-09-16 05:20:00 Observatory:Dynamics Explorer 1 Cadence:
Stop:1984-06-28 23:20:00 Instrument:Dynamics Explorer 1 Plasma Waves Instrument (PWI) Resource:DisplayData
This dataset contains dynamic spectrogram PNG plots of the DE-1/PWI Step Frequency Correlator and Low Frequency Correlator data. Each plot spans one orbital period (6 hours 49 minutes). There are three types of files in this dataset. Those derived from data using: 1) the spin-plane 200m electric antenna (Ex), 2) the spin-axis 8m electric antenna (Ez) and 3) the magnetic antennas (B-H) consisting of a 1.0m^2 loop antenna in the spin plane and a search coil on the spin axis. Each image consists of two panels. The title above each panel indicates the instrument, antenna and frequency range. Each panel is a plot of the power spectral density of received signal (color scale) as a function of operating frequency (in a logarithmic scale on the vertical axis) and time (horizontal axis). Beneath the time labels on the horizontal axis of the spectrograms are ephemeris data: position of the spacecraft in radial distance (Earth radii), McIlwain L-shell, magnetic local time, and geomagnetic latitude. Overlaid on each image are traces of the electron cyclotron frequencies. The file naming convention is: de1_pwi_0000_YYYYMMDD_HHMM_AAA.png where: 0000 - Replace with orbit number YYYYMMDD - Replace with date HHMM - Replace with start time AAA - Replace with antenna string

20) Dynamics Explorer 1 Plasma Wave Instrument Sweep Frequency Receiver-A 2 Hour Dynamic Spectrogram Plots maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VWO/DisplayData/DynamicsExplorer1/PWI/SFR.A.PT2H
Start:1981-09-16 05:20:00 Observatory:Dynamics Explorer 1 Cadence:
Stop:1984-06-28 23:20:00 Instrument:Dynamics Explorer 1 Plasma Waves Instrument (PWI) Resource:DisplayData
This dataset contains two hour duration dynamic spectrogram GIF plots of the DE-1/PWI SFR-A (electric antenna). Each image is a plot of the power spectral density (V^2 m^-2 Hz^-1) of received signal (color scale) as a function of operating frequency (in a logarithmic scale on the vertical axis) and time (horizontal axis). At the top center of each plot is a title indicating the University of Iowa, the instrument, and the date. On the upper left is an indication of the receiver used, the upper right is the orbit number. Immediately below the title is a horizontal bar and the label "WB" on the extreme left indicating the time duration when wideband data were acquired. Beneath the time labels on the horizontal axis of the spectrogram are ephemeris data: position of the spacecraft in radial distance (Earth radii), McIlwain L-shell, magnetic local time, and geomagnetic latitude. Overlaid on each image are traces of the electron, hydrogen and oxygen cyclotron frequencies. Running along the left edge of the plot next to the frequency scale is the date represented as two digit year, day of year, hour and minute of the start of the plot.

21) Galileo PWS Earth Flyby Daily Dynamic Spectrograms Electric maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VWO/DisplayData/Galileo/PWS/DS.Electric.P1D
Start:1990-11-08 17:00:00 Observatory:Galileo Cadence:
Stop:1992-12-17 06:30:00 Instrument:Galileo PWS Resource:DisplayData
These PWS daily spectrograms cover the time range around the time of the Galileo spacecraft's two Earth flybys on its way to Jupiter. This dataset contains electric field spectrograms in units of electric field spectral density (V^2/m^2/Hz) spanning 6 Hz to 5.6 MHz. An associated dataset contains magnetic field spectrograms in units of magnetic field spectral density (nT^2/Hz) spanning 6 Hz to 75 kHz. The sources of this browse data set are the High Frequency Receiver, Sweep Frequency Receiver, and Spectrum Analyzer which make up the Low Rate Science portion of the PWS. The high frequency receiver data that appears in the uppermost panel of the spectrograms are only taken from the electric field antennas. During the time interval spanned by the first Earth flyby, Galileo approached Earth from the local early morning sector, made a close approach to Earth by passing through the magnetosphere, plasmasphere, ionosphere, and finally exited the Earth system in the local late morning. During the time interval spanned by the second Earth flyby, Galileo approached Earth from the local late evening sector, made a close approach to Earth by passing through the magnetosphere, plasmasphere, ionosphere, and finally exited the Earth system near local dawn. +-----------------------------------------------------+ | Flyby 1 | | 1990 November 8 1700 UT | - dataset start | | 1990 December 8 | - Earth closest approach | | 1990 December 18 1700 UT | - dataset end | +-----------------------------------------------------+ +-----------------------------------------------------+ | Flyby 2 | | 1992 November 6 2100 UT | - dataset start | | 1992 December 8 | - Earth closest approach | | 1992 December 17 0630 UT | - dataset ends | +-----------------------------------------------------+

22) Galileo PWS Earth Flyby Daily Dynamic Spectrograms Magnetic maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VWO/DisplayData/Galileo/PWS/DS.Magnetic.P1D
Start:1990-11-08 17:00:00 Observatory:Galileo Cadence:
Stop:1992-12-17 06:30:00 Instrument:Galileo PWS Resource:DisplayData
These PWS daily spectrograms cover the time range around the time of the Galileo spacecraft's two Earth flybys on its way to Jupiter. This dataset contains magnetic field spectrograms in units of magnetic field spectral density (nT^2/Hz) spanning 6 Hz to 75 kHz. An associated dataset contains electric field spectrograms in units of electric field spectral density (V^2/m^2/Hz) spanning 6 Hz to 5.6 MHz. The sources of this browse data set are the High Frequency Receiver, Sweep Frequency Receiver, and Spectrum Analyzer which make up the Low Rate Science portion of the PWS. The high frequency receiver data that appears in the uppermost panel of the spectrograms are only taken from the electric field antennas. During the time interval spanned by the first Earth flyby, Galileo approached Earth from the local early morning sector, made a close approach to Earth by passing through the magnetosphere, plasmasphere, ionosphere, and finally exited the Earth system in the local late morning. During the time interval spanned by the second Earth flyby, Galileo approached Earth from the local late evening sector, made a close approach to Earth by passing through the magnetosphere, plasmasphere, ionosphere, and finally exited the Earth system near local dawn. +-----------------------------------------------------+ | Flyby 1 | | 1990 November 8 1700 UT | - dataset start | | 1990 December 8 | - Earth closest approach | | 1990 December 18 1700 UT | - dataset end | +-----------------------------------------------------+ +-----------------------------------------------------+ | Flyby 2 | | 1992 November 6 2100 UT | - dataset start | | 1992 December 8 | - Earth closest approach | | 1992 December 17 0630 UT | - dataset ends | +-----------------------------------------------------+

23) Geotail PWI 24 hour dynamic spectrograms maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VWO/DisplayData/Geotail/PWI/DS.P1D
Start:1992-09-18 00:00:00 Observatory:Geotail Cadence:
Stop:2016-05-19 13:23:47 Instrument:Geotail Plasma Wave Investigation (PWI) Resource:DisplayData
Geotail PWI SFA and MCA dynamic spectrogram plots with frequency in Hz on the vertical axis and time in UT on the horizontal axis. Each file contains one spectrogram from the electric field antennas and one from the magnetic field search coils. The electric field spectrograms span the frequency range 5.62 to 24 Hz (the Multi-Channel Analyzer - MCA instrument) and 24 Hz to 800 kHz (the Sweep Frequency Analyzer - SFA instrument). The intensity values are color coded and are expressed in units of dBV/m/root-Hz. The magnetic field spectrograms also combine the MCA and SFA instruments and span the frequency range 5.62 Hz to 12.5 kHz. The intensity values are color coded and are expressed in units of dB nT/root-Hz. Each plot spans 24 hours. Beneath the time axis of the magnetic field spectrogram are spacecraft GSM coordinates for every 4 hours. Information on the instrument and antenna status is also provided above each spectrogram.

24) Geotail PWI 2 hour dynamic spectrograms maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VWO/DisplayData/Geotail/PWI/DS.PT2H
Start:1992-09-18 00:00:00 Observatory:Geotail Cadence:
Stop:2016-05-19 13:23:47 Instrument:Geotail Plasma Wave Investigation (PWI) Resource:DisplayData
Geotail PWI SFA and MCA dynamic spectrogram plots with frequency in Hz on the vertical axis and time in UT on the horizontal axis. Each file contains one spectrogram from the electric field antennas and one from the magnetic field search coils. The electric field spectrograms span the frequency range 5.62 to 24 Hz (the Multi-Channel Analyzer - MCA instrument) and 24 Hz to 800 kHz (the Sweep Frequency Analyzer - SFA instrument). The intensity values are color coded and are expressed in units of dBV/m/root-Hz. The magnetic field spectrograms also combine the MCA and SFA instruments and span the frequency range 5.62 Hz to 12.5 kHz. The intensity values are color coded and are expressed in units of dB nT/root-Hz. Each plot spans 2 hours. Information on the instrument and antenna status is also provided above each spectrogram.

25) Hawkeye Multi-Instrument Summary Plots maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VWO/DisplayData/Hawkeye/VLF/Multi.Instrument.PT51H
Start:1974-06-06 03:00:00 Observatory:Hawkeye Cadence:
Stop:1978-04-28 17:00:00 Instrument:Hawkeye VLF Resource:DisplayData
To help the user in searching through the Hawkeye data set, summary plots of the entire Hawkeye archive have been generated. Each summary plot consists of an entire orbit's worth of data from all of the instruments, along with the spacecraft position. Solar wind plasma pressure and IMF data have been added to the plots to help the user in data selection. HAWKEYE SUMMARY PLOT LAYOUT Title The orbit number is the orbit number at start of the plot time interval. Day 1 = January 1. First (top) panel Solar Wind pressure (red curve and red dots). Solar Wind IMF Bz component (in GSM) (blue dots). IMP-8 spacecraft Bz (in GSM) component (black curve). Second Panel The two numbers above the second panel are the positions of IMP-8 in degrees ( sign(y_gsm) * atan(sqrt(y_gsm^2+z_gsm^2)/x_gsm) ), at the start of and at the end of the plot time interval. Usually, if IMP-8 lies between -110 and +110 degrees it is in the solar wind. Solar Wind IMF magnetic field magnitude |B| (blue dots). IMP-8 magnetic Field magnitude |B| (black curve). Hawkeye magnetic Field magnitude |B| (red curve). Third Panel The two numbers above the third panel are: (left corner) The angle between the sun vector and spacecraft spin plane. Because the Hawkeye particle instrument's (LEPEDEA) field view is +/- 15 degrees out the the spin plane, this angle has to be less than 15 degrees in order to detect the solar wind when the spacecraft is located in the solar wind. (right corner)The spin period of the spacecraft in seconds. The electron energy-time spectrogram averaged over the solid angle sampled by LEPEDEA is plotted. Fourth Panel The ion energy-time spectrogram averaged over the solid angle sampled by LEPEDEA Fifth Panel The frequency-time spectrogram of the magnetic field as measured by the loop antenna The electron cyclotron frequency (white curve) as determined by the on-board magnetometer Sixth (bottom) Panel The electric field frequency-time spectrogram as measured by the dipole antenna The electron cyclotron frequency (white curve) as determined by the on-board magnetometer Time Axis Labels The universal time (hr:mm). The spacecraft position in Earth radii (RE) in units of RE. The spacecraft position in magnetic latitude (MLAT) in units of degrees. The spacecraft position in magnetic local time (MLT) in units of degrees. The spacecraft position in X-GSM in units of RE.

26) Hawkeye Electric and Magnetic Field Radio Frequency Spectrum Analyzer High Time Resolution maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VWO/NumericalData/Hawkeye/VLF/PT22S
Start:1974-06-08 06:45:10 Observatory:Hawkeye Cadence:22 seconds
Stop:1978-04-26 15:59:05 Instrument:Hawkeye VLF Resource:NumericalData
The CDF file contains approximately 22 second time resolution Electric and Magnetic field data, average magnetic field magnitude, and orbital position data from Hawkeye 1. The VLF experiment measured electric and magnetic fields using a 42.45-m electric dipole (tip-to-tip) which extended perpendicular to the spin axis and a search coil antenna deployed 1.58 m from the spacecraft. The electric field spectrum measurements were made in 16 logarithmically spaced frequency channels extending from 1.78 Hz to 178 kHz, and dc electric fields were also measured. The bandwidth of these channels varied from 7.5% to 30% depending on center frequency. Channel sensitivity and dynamic range were 1E-6 V/m and 100 dB, respectively. A wideband receiver was also used, with two selectable bandwidth ranges: 0.15 to 10 kHz or 1 to 45 kHz. The magnetic field spectrum was measured in eight discrete, logarithmically spaced channels from 1.78 Hz to 5.62 kHz. The bandwidth of these channels varied from 7.5% to 30% depending on frequency. The dynamic range was 100 dB, and the sensitivity ranged from 0.1 nT at 1.78 Hz to 3.4E-4 nT at 5.62 kHz. The wideband receiver described above could be used with the magnetic antenna. Each discrete channel was sampled once every 11.52 s.

27) Helios 1 E6 (Kunow) Hourly Particle Fluxes maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VEPO/NumericalData/Helios1/E6/PT1H
Start:1974-12-11 00:00:00 Observatory:Helios 1 Cadence:1 hour
Stop:1983-12-31 00:00:00 Instrument:Cosmic Ray Particles Resource:NumericalData
Data set records contain fluxes of protons in 5 energy ranges (4-13, 13-27, 27-37, 37-51, >51 MeV), alpha particles in 6 energy ranges (2-4, 4-13, 13-27, 27-37, 37-48, >48 MeV/n), and electrons in 2 ranges (0.3-0.8, 0.8-2.0 MeV). The fluxes are averaged over intervals of approximately one hour. Each "data record" (having ending CR and/or LF) spans 4-5 hours and has 10 time-overlapping segments. Each segment has averaging start and stop times plus words for 13 fluxes and words for the statistical uncertainties in the 13 fluxes. However, most words in a given segment have fill values, such that good values for a given flux (species and energy range) and its uncertainty appear only in a minority of the segments. No spacecraft position information is included. Data are from the E6 experiment on Helios 1.

28) Helios 1 E7 (Trainor) 30-min fluxes and rates maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VEPO/NumericalData/Helios1/E7/PT30M
Start:1974-12-16 00:00:00 Observatory:Helios 1 Cadence:30 minutes
Stop:1982-12-31 00:00:00 Instrument:Galactic and Solar Cosmic Rays Resource:NumericalData
This data set, created in 2010 by Nand Lal, contains 30-min resolution fluxes and count rates of energetic protons, alpha particles, electrons and X-rays from the E7 experiment (P.I.: J. Trainor, GSFC) flown on the Helios 1 spacecraft. Accompanying each flux and count rate is a statistical uncertainty of the flux or rate. The data are spin-averaged. The data are in 920-character ASCII records and consist of: A. Proton fluxes based on pulse height and rate data in 7 energy windows, 3.40-6.05, 6.05-11.10, 11.10-21.60, 24.52-28.82, 32.00-46.30, 45.30-57.22, 135.2-206.5 MeV. B. Alpha particle fluxes based on pulse heights and count rates in 6 energy windows, 3.20-4.98, 4.98-11.50, 11.50-21.60, 24.51-31.12, 31.12-45.53, 45.53-57.53 MeV/n. C. Combined proton plus alpha particle fluxes based on LET1 and HET count rates in 6 energy windows, 3-6, 6-11, 11-21, 20-30, 32-45, 45-56 MeV/n. D. Alpha particle fluxes based on HET count rates in three energy windows, 20-30, 32-45, 45-57 MeV/n. E. Two count rates primarily due to electrons at 2-4 and 4-8 MeV. F. 21 additional count rates corresponding to individual telescope sensors or sensor combinations. For one sensor, rates at each of several discrimination levels are given). These rates are further discussed in the documentation and in the references provided. A subset of the above parameters (A, B, E) are available with graphical display at the OMNIWeb-Plus interface identified below

29) Helios 1 E8 (Keppler) Hourly Particle Fluxes maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VEPO/NumericalData/Helios1/E8/PT1H
Start:1974-12-10 00:00:00 Observatory:Helios 1 Cadence:1 hour
Stop:1980-12-31 00:00:00 Instrument:Energetic Electron and Proton Detector Resource:NumericalData
Data set records contain hourly count rates of protons and electrons in 16 energy ranges (protons: 15 differential channels between 21 and 677 keV, plus >677 keV; electrons: 15 differential channels between 17 and 835 keV, plus >835 keV), each in 16 22.5 deg azimuthal sectors. Accumulation times for each count rate are also given. No spacecraft position information is included. Data are from the E8 experiment on Helios 1.

30) Helios 2 E6 (Kunow) Hourly Particle Fluxes maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VEPO/NumericalData/Helios2/E6/PT1H
Start:1976-01-16 00:00:00 Observatory:Helios 2 Cadence:1 hour
Stop:1980-03-08 00:00:00 Instrument:Cosmic Ray Particles Resource:NumericalData
Data set records contain fluxes of protons in 5 energy ranges (4-13, 13-27, 27-37, 37-51, >51 MeV), alpha particles in 6 energy ranges (2-4, 4-13, 13-27, 27-37, 37-48, >48 MeV/n), and electrons in 2 ranges (0.3-0.8, 0.8-2.0 MeV). The fluxes are averaged over intervals of approximately one hour. Each "data record" (having ending CR and/or LF) spans 4-5 hours and has 10 time-overlapping segments. Each segment has averaging start and stop times plus words for 13 fluxes and words for the statistical uncertainties in the 13 fluxes. However, most words in a given segment have fill values, such that good values for a given flux (species and energy range) and its uncertainty appear only in a minority of the segments. No spacecraft position information is included. Data are from the E6 experiment on Helios 2.

31) Helios 2 E7 (Trainor) 30-min fluxes and rates maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VEPO/NumericalData/Helios2/E7/PT30M
Start:1976-01-19 00:00:00 Observatory:Helios 2 Cadence:30 minutes
Stop:1979-12-23 00:00:00 Instrument:Galactic and Solar Cosmic Rays Resource:NumericalData
This data set, created in 2010 by Nand Lal, contains 30-min resolution fluxes and count rates of energetic protons, alpha particles, electrons and X-rays from the E7 experiment (P.I.: J. Trainor, GSFC) flown on the Helios 2 spacecraft. Accompanying each flux and count rate is a statistical uncertainty of the flux or rate. The data are spin-averaged. The data are in 1020-character ASCII records and consist of: A. Proton fluxes based on pulse height and rate data in 7 energy windows, 3.42-5.40, 6.40-11.95, 11.95-22.15, 24.59-28.74, 32.20-45.93, 45.93-57.56, 143.0-204.5 MeV. B. Alpha particle fluxes based on pulse heights and count rates in 6 energy windows, 3.24-4.78, 5.00-11.55, 11.55-21.76, 24.53-31.12, 31.35-45.63, 45.63-57.55 MeV/n. C. Combined proton plus alpha particle fluxes based on LET1 and HET count rates in 6 energy windows, 3-6, 6-11, 11-21, 20-30, 32-45, 45-56 MeV/n. D. Alpha particle fluxes based on HET count rates in three energy windows, 20-30, 32-45, 45-57 MeV/n. E. Two count rates primarily due to electrons at 2-4 and 4-8 MeV. F. 26 additional count rates corresponding to individual telescope sensors or sensor coincidences. For one sensor, rates at each of several discrimination levels are given). These rates are further discussed in the documentation and in the references provided. A subset of the above parameters (A, B, E) are available with graphical display at the OMNIWeb-Plus interface identified below

32) Helios 2 E8 (Keppler) Hourly Particle Fluxes maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VEPO/NumericalData/Helios2/E8/PT1H
Start:1976-01-15 00:00:00 Observatory:Helios 2 Cadence:1 hour
Stop:1980-03-08 00:00:00 Instrument:Energetic Electron and Proton Detector Resource:NumericalData
Data set records contain hourly count rates of protons and electrons in 16 energy ranges (protons: 15 differential channels between 21 and 677 keV, plus >677 keV; electrons: 15 differential channels between 17 and 835 keV, plus >835 keV), each in 16 22.5 deg azimuthal sectors. Accumulation times for each count rate are also given. No spacecraft position information is included. Data are from the E8 experiment on Helios 2.

33) IMAGE RPI Daily Dynamic Spectrogram Plot maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VWO/DisplayData/IMAGE/RPI/DS.P1D
Start:2000-04-21 20:24:42 Observatory:IMAGE Cadence:5 minutes
Stop:2005-12-18 07:50:00 Instrument:Radio Plasma Imager (RPI) Resource:DisplayData
Collection of RPI Daily Dynamic Spectrogram plots at NASA GSFC, covering complete mission period from 2000-04-21 to 2005-12-18. Dynamic Spectrograms present the time history of natural radio emissions in space between 3 and 1009 kHz while the IMAGE spacecraft orbits the Earth. This operating frequency range was selected by the RPI team to provide an optimal temporal resolution to the wave observations. Each image is a daily plot of the voltage spectral density of received signal (color scale) as function of operating frequency (vertical axis) and time (horizontal axis). Commonly used in the analysis of noise generators, spectral density is a frequency-dependent characteristic that describes how much power is generated by the emission source in a 1 Hz bandwidth. RPI Dynamic Spectograms plot a Voltage Spectral Density, which is root of power spectral density, measured in [V/root-Hz] units. Note that conversion of antenna voltage to electric field strength depends on effective length of receive antennas, and such conversion is not performed here. RPI is capable of detecting input radio emissions above its noise floor of 5 nV/root-Hz, which is determined by the internal white noise of the RPI antenna pre-amplifiers.

34) RPI Dynamic Spectrogram data in CDF at NASA CDAWeb maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VWO/NumericalData/IMAGE/RPI/DS.PT5M
Start:2000-04-21 20:24:42 Observatory:IMAGE Cadence:5 minutes
Stop:2005-12-18 07:50:00 Instrument:Radio Plasma Imager (RPI) Resource:NumericalData
RPI passive wave measurement capturing voltage spectral density of the radio emissions in space as a function of frequency, typically between 3 and 1009 kHz. This operating frequency range was selected by the RPI team to provide optimal temporal resolution of the wave observations. Commonly used in the analysis of noise generators, spectral density is a frequency-dependent characteristic that describes how much power is generated by the emission source in a 1 Hz bandwidth. The original description of emissions was done in terms of thermal noise measurements, though the same approach also applies to non-thermal emissions such as AKR. CDF_DS_PT5M stores calibrated data from all three RPI antennas X, Y, and Z individually and a combined X+Y antenna channel. The data are presented as the Voltage Spectral Density (VSD), which is the root of power spectral density, measured in [V/root-Hz] units. Note that conversion of antenna voltage to electric field strength depends on the effective length of the receive antenna, and such conversion is not performed here. (See spase://SMWG/Instrument/IMAGE/RPI for a time history of the lengths of the three mutually orthogonal RPI dipole antennas.) RPI is capable of detecting input radio emissions above its noise floor of 5 nV/root-Hz, which is determined by the internal white noise of the RPI antenna pre-amplifiers. The VSD in RPI spectrogram data is presented in dB relative to 1 V/root-Hz (logarithmic scale), units of dB(V/root-Hz). The RPI instrument noise floor is 5 nV/root-Hz = -166 dB(V/root-Hz) at the receiver input. Software suggested by the science team for CDF file visualization: (1) Plotting tool at the CDAWeb portal, (2) For analysis beyond static image inspection, including color scale optimization, zooming, text export, alternative data representations in physical units, detailed frequency and time information, overlaid model fpe and fce graphs, and EPS quality figures, use BinBrowser software at UML, http://ulcar.uml.edu/rpi.html

35) RPI Plasmagram data in CDF at NASA CDAWeb maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VWO/NumericalData/IMAGE/RPI/PGM.CDF.PT5M
Start:2000-03-26 07:51:50 Observatory:IMAGE Cadence:5 minutes
Stop:2005-12-18 07:40:47 Instrument:Radio Plasma Imager (RPI) Resource:NumericalData
Software suggested by the science team for CDF file visualization: (1) Plotting tool at the CDAWeb portal, (2) For analysis beyond static image inspection, including color scale optimization, zooming, text export, alternative data representations in physical units, detailed frequency and time information, overlaid model fpe and fce graphs, and EPS quality figures, use BinBrowser software at UML, http://ulcar.uml.edu/rpi.html

36) IMAGE RPI Plasmagram Plots maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VWO/DisplayData/IMAGE/RPI/PGM.PT5M
Start:2000-04-21 20:24:42 Observatory:IMAGE Cadence:5 minutes
Stop:2005-12-18 07:50:00 Instrument:Radio Plasma Imager (RPI) Resource:DisplayData
Collection of RPI Plasmagram images at University of Massachusetts Lowell, covering complete mission period from 2000-04-21 to 2005-12-18. Access to images is arranged via a webpage containing a query form with the time period of interest and options for search of expert-annotated plasmagrams. The query returns a list of qualifying plasmagrams with URLs pointing to images. RPI plasmagrams are visualized by plotting images in which received signal strength (color scale) is a function of echo delay (range in vertical scale) and radio-sounder frequency (horizontal scale) of the sounder pulses. Echoes that can be used to derive remote, long-range, magnetospheric electron-density profiles, appear as discrete traces on plasmagrams. These plasmagram traces are intermixed with vertical signatures with greater intensity at shorter ranges, corresponding to locally excited plasma resonances, and other vertical signatures that cover the entire listening period, i.e., the entire virtual-range scale, corresponding to various natural and/or man-made emissions propagating in space and/or local interference.

37) ISEE 1 Plasma Wave Instrument Spectrum Analyzer Spectrogram Plots maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VWO/DisplayData/ISEE1/PWE/SA.PT12H
Start:1977-10-23 00:00:00 Observatory:ISEE 1 Cadence:
Stop:1987-09-26 23:59:59 Instrument:ISEE-1 Plasma wave experiment Resource:DisplayData
This dataset contains dynamic spectrogram PNG plots of the ISEE-1/PWI Spectrum Analyzer data. Each plot spans 12 hours. The dataset consists of files from 0-12UT and 12-24UT. These data were obtained from the Ev long wire antenna in the spin plane and the Bz search coil along the spin axis. Each image consists of two panels. The title above the upper panel is "ISEE-1 PWI Spectrum Analyzer Ev Antenna and Bz Search Coil". Each panel is a plot of the power spectral density of received signal (color scale) as a function of operating frequency (in a logarithmic scale on the vertical axis) and time (horizontal axis). The upper panel is a plot of Electric Spectral Density (SD) the lower plot is Magnetic SD. Beneath the time labels on the horizontal axis of the spectrograms are ephemeris data: position of the spacecraft in radial distance (Earth radii), geomagnetic latitude, magnetic local time, and McIlwain L-shell. Overlaid on the upper plot are traces of the electron cyclotron frequencies. At the bottom of the image is the date, day number and time range. Located in the same directory are the daily ISEE-1 PWI Sweep Frequency Receiver (SFR) spectrograms.

38) ISEE 1 Plasma Wave Instrument Sweep Frequency Receiver Spectrogram Plots maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VWO/DisplayData/ISEE1/PWE/SFR.P1D
Start:1977-10-26 00:00:00 Observatory:ISEE 1 Cadence:
Stop:1987-09-26 23:59:59 Instrument:ISEE-1 Plasma wave experiment Resource:DisplayData
This dataset contains dynamic spectrogram PNG plots of the ISEE1/PWI Sweep Frequency Receiver (SFR) data. Each plot spans one day. These data were obtained from the Ev long wire antenna in the spin plane and the Eu two-sphere antenna via the SFR receiver. The title above each spectrogram is "ISEE-1 PWI Sweep Frequency Receiver Ev and Eu Antennas". Each spectrogram is a plot of the power spectral density of received signal (color scale) as a function of operating frequency (in a logarithmic scale on the vertical axis) and time (horizontal axis). Beneath the time labels on the horizontal axis of the spectrograms are ephemeris data: position of the spacecraft in radial distance (Earth radii), geomagnetic latitude, magnetic local time, and McIlwain L-shell. Overlaid on each image are traces of the electron cyclotron frequencies. Located in the same directory are are the 12 hour ISEE-1 PWI Spectrum Analyzer (SA) spectrograms.

39) ISEE-3 Radio Mapping Experiment Demodulated - 1.5 sec resolution maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VWO/NumericalData/ISEE3/RadioMapping/DEMOD.PT1.5S
Start:1978-08-13 08:31:28 Observatory:ISEE 3 Cadence:1.5 seconds
Stop:1987-01-23 11:13:38 Instrument:ISEE 3 Radio Mapping Experiment Resource:NumericalData
The following is extracted from "User Guide for ISEE-3 Radio Mapping Experiment CD-ROM Data" the original document is available via the Information URL below. The ISEE-3 Radio Mapping Experiment is designed to detect and measure radio bursts from the Sun, the interplanetary medium, and the Earth's magnetosphere, at frequencies from 30 kHz to 2 MHz. It is a collaboration of the Observatory of Paris-Meudon and the Goddard Space Flight Center; the Principal Investigator is Jean-Louis Steinberg. The experiment determines the direction of sources and estimates their apparent angular sizes using two dipole antennas. One dipole, the shorter of the two, is along the spin axis of the satellite, while the second dipole is perpendicular to the spin axis and is therefore carried around by the rotation of the satellite. Each of the monopoles making up the spin-axis dipole can be extended to 7m, whereas each monopole making up the dipole in the spin plane is 45m long. The signal received by the spinning dipole is modulated, being strongest when the dipole is perpendicular to the direction of the source. The phase of the spin modulation provides information on the direction of the source, projected onto the plane in which the dipole is spinning, and the amplitude of the modulation determines the angular size of the source as a function of its elevation above or below the spin plane. The additional information provided by the spin-axis dipole helps determine whether the source is above or below the spin plane, and its elevation. Detailed Description of the Data Acquisition The experiment is designed to make a series of measurements at each frequency (listed in Table 2-1), covering one-half spin. Such a series is called a step. The specifics of the data are described below. In this document, the spin-axis dipole is called the Z-dipole, because the spin axis is labeled the z-axis of the satellite-based coordinate system. The other dipole is called the S-dipole, because it is spinning. ISEE-3 has two spinning dipoles, called U and V. Only the V dipole was used to acquire radio data. Table 2-1. ISEE-3 Radio Mapping Experiment Frequencies +------------------------------------+ | Channel | Receiver Freq. (Khz) | | No. | Broad | Narrow | |===========|=========|==============| | 1 |1980 | 1000 | | 2 |1000 | 466 | | 3 | 513 | 290 | | 4 | 360 | 188 | | 5 | 233 | 145 | | 6 | 160 | 110 | | 7 | 123 | 80 | | 8 | 94 | 66 | | 9 | 72 | 56 | | 10 | 60 | 47 | | 11 | 50 | 36 | | 12 | 41 | 30 | +------------------------------------+ Demodulating the data The direction to the source and the source strength are determined from the spin-modulated S samples and the Z sample by the procedure described in the following section. The linear least-squares solution provides a despun source amplitude A, which is its maximum amplitude, observed when the S dipole is "broadside" to the source, the azimuth angle with respect to the Sun of the source center in the spin plane, and a measure of the modulation of the source due to the changing orientation of the S dipole, called alpha. The standard deviation of the least-squares fit and the uncertainties in the three parameters are also calculated. Comparison of the Z sample and A with the modulation index alpha permits to evaluate the source radius and its elevation from the spin plane. Data file contents There are 3 different sets of data files that are of potential interest to new users - 1.5 sec modulated data, 108 second averages, and 1.5 sec demodulated data. The 1.5 sec modulated data files contain individual data samples, calibrated in units of antenna temperature. The spin modulation has not been removed from these files. The 108 sec average files are simple averages of the 1.5 sec modulated data as a function of frequency. (Note that the average is done in log space, I.e., mean(log(antenna temperature)).) Finally, the 1.5 sec demodulated data file contains the parameters A, alpha, and azimuth. The demodulated data file is the file that most users will want to use. Contents of the ISEE-3 Radio 1.5 sec DEMOD Record +--------------------------------------------------------------------+ | VARIABLE | DIM| # | DESCRIPTION | |==========|====|=======|============================================| |MDATE | | |Julian date of record (YYDDD) | |MHMS | | |Time of midpoint of record in hhmmss | |MSEC | | |Time of midpoint or record in msecs | |NFREQ | | |Frequency channel 1-12 | |ADSP |4 |1 |Despun SB amplitude (or SN for Mode3) | | |2 | |Despun SN amplitude if mode 1 | | |3 | |Log of SB as log TA | | |4 | |Log SN if mode 1, else 0 | |ALPHA |2 |1 |Modulation Index for B(or N if mode3) | | | |2 |Modulation Index for N if mode 1, else 0 | |PHI |2 | |Source longitude(increasing to west of sun) | | | | |for B, N in degrees (-90 - 90) | |Z |4 | |Average Z amplitude - elements as for ADSP | |PHASE |2 | |Phase(volts) for the first input record used| | | | |in group for B, N(or both B for mode 2, both| | | | |N for mode 3) | |PHANG |2 | |Phase sun angle for B,N in radians | |ELEV |2 | |Calculated elevation angle for B,N | |RAD |2 | |Calculated source radius for B,N in degrees | |BW |4 |1 |Background value used for SB in calculating | | | | |ELEV and RAD | | | |2 |Background value used for SN (mode 1) | | | |3 |Background value used for ZB | | | |4 |Background value for ZN if mode 1 | |ST |2 | |Fractional standard deviations of least | | | | |squares fit for B,N | |SIGA |3x2 | |Uncertainties in parameters for least | | | | |squares fit | | | |1x |Uncertainty in mean SB, SN amplitude | | | |2x |Uncertainty in alpha for B,N | | | |3x |Uncertainty in PHI for B, N in degrees | |NSAMP | | |Number of S samples in fit | |IQUAL |2 | |Quality of analysis B, N | |KDATE | | |Julian date of processing | |MODE | | |Data mode | |SPINP | | |Spin period in msec | |GSE |3 | |XYZ coordinates Geocentric solar ecliptic | | | | |in meters | |SPARE |10 | |Spares | +--------------------------------------------------------------------+

40) Australian Space Weather Services Learmonth Observatory Spectrograms maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VWO/DisplayData/Learmonth/DS.GIF.PT12H
Start:2000-06-16 05:00:00 Observatory:Learmonth Cadence:
Stop:2016-05-19 13:23:47 Instrument:Learmonth Solar Radiospectrograph Resource:DisplayData
Culgoora and Learmonth Observatories dynamic spectrogram plots display frequency in MHz on the vertical axis and time in UT on the horizontal axis. The time span for each plot varies, generally spanning local day time hours with time resolution of 3 seconds. The frequency range is 18 - 1800 MHz for Culgoora spectrogams and 25 - 180 MHz for Learmonth spectrograms. The intensity values are color coded and are expressed as relative logarithmic units (0 to 255). The Culgoora spectrograms consist of 4 frequency bands: 18-57, 57-180, 180-570 570 -1800 MHz and Learmonth has 2 bands: 25-75, 75-180 MHz. The two Learmonth bands are each divided into 400 frequency steps. Culgoora spectrograph data is available since November 1992, Learmonth data since June 2000.

41) Polar Plasma Wave Instrument, Low Frequency Waveform Receiver, ~0.01 sec resolution fields maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VWO/NumericalData/POLAR/PWI/LFWR.PT0.01S
Start:1996-03-25 00:00:16 Observatory:POLAR Cadence:0.01 seconds
Stop:1997-09-16 16:52:55 Instrument:Polar Plasma Waves Investigation (PWI) Resource:NumericalData
The Low-Frequency Waveform Receiver (LFWR) is designed to provide an extension of the High Frequency Waveform Receiver into the frequency range below 25 Hz. The LFWR consists of six parallel low-pass filters connected to the three orthogonal electric field sensors and to the triaxial search coils. The input signals are band limited to a frequency range from 0.1 to 25 Hz and are sam- pled by a 12-bit analog-to-digital converter. The six LFWR channels are sampled simultaneously at a rate of 100 samples s-1. The dynamic range of the LFWRis approximately 72 dB with fixed gain. An FFT on 256 or 464 values, depending on the snapshot size, was used in calibrating the data; i.e., perform FFT, calibrate andin frequency domain, perform inverse FFT to get calibrated time series. Coordinate System Used: local magnetic field-aligned, a spacecraft centered coordinate system where Z is parallel to the local B-field determined from Polar MFE, X points outward and lies in the plane defined by the Z-axis and the radial vector from the earth to the spacecraft, and Y completes a right-handed system and points eastward. The X- and Z-axes are contained in the north-south plane. The three orthogonal magnetic field components are given in units of nT/Sec rather than nT because the response of the searchcoils across the passband is not flat. In order to obtain units of nT, the data would need to be digitally filtered to the frequency of interest and then integrated over time. Integrating over the entire passband could possibly destroy the resolution of the higher frequency components since the low frequency noise, if present, will dominate. Data are bandpass filtered. The valid range of data in the frequency domain is from 0.5 to 22.5 Hz. Reference:..Gurnett, D.A. et al, The Polar plasma wave instrument, Space Science Reviews, Vol. 71, pp. 597-622, 1995.

42) Polar PWI MCA Survey Spectrograms maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VWO/DisplayData/POLAR/PWI/MCA.DS.P1D
Start:1996-03-25 00:00:00 Observatory:POLAR Cadence:
Stop:1997-09-16 17:00:00 Instrument:Polar Plasma Waves Investigation (PWI) Resource:DisplayData
The Polar PWI Multichannel Analyzer (MCA) collected data from March 1996 to September 1997. The MCA data has very good time resolution (~1 s) but relatively poor frequency resolution. An electric field measurement covers 5.6 Hz to 311 kHz in 20 channels logarithmically spaced. The magnetic field measurements cover a range from 5.6 Hz to 10 kHz in 14 channels logarithmically spaced. Each file consists of two plots. Each plot contains the power spectral density (color scale) of received signal (upper plot: electric (V^2 m^-2 Hz^-1), lower plot: magnetic (nT^2 Hz^-1) ) as a function of operating frequency (in a logarithmic scale on vertical axis) and time (horizontal axis). At the top of each plot is a title indicating the Instrument, Receiver and Antenna used along with the time span for the spectrogram. Overlaid on each image is a trace of the electron gyrofrequency. Beneath the time labels on the horizontal axis of the lower plot are ephemeris data: position of the spacecraft in radial distance (Earth radii), geomagnetic latitude, magnetic local time, and McIlwain L-shell. Overlaid on each image is a trace of the electron gyrofrequency. Reference: Gurnett, D.A. et al, The Polar plasma wave instrument, Space Science Reviews, Vol. 71, pp. 597-622, 1995.

43) Polar Plasma Wave Instrument, Multichannel Analyzer - 1.3 sec resolution fields maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VWO/NumericalData/POLAR/PWI/MCA.PT1.3S
Start:1996-03-25 00:00:00 Observatory:POLAR Cadence:1.3 seconds
Stop:1997-09-16 17:00:00 Instrument:Polar Plasma Waves Investigation (PWI) Resource:NumericalData
The PO_H0_PWI Multichannel Analyzer (MCA) CDF files provide good time resolution with relatively poor frequency resolution. An electric field measurement covers 5.6 Hz to 311 kHz in 20 channels logarithmically spaced. The magnetic field measurements cover a range from 5.6 Hz to 10 kHz in 14 channels logarithmically spaced. Reference: Gurnett, D.A. et al, The Polar plasma wave instrument, Space Science Reviews, Vol. 71, pp. 597-622, 1995. Note: The electron cyclotron frequencies are derived from the following: Fce = 0.028 kHz*B, where B is the magnitude of the ambient magnetic field measured in nT.

44) Polar PWI SFR-A Daily Dynamic Spectrograms maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VWO/DisplayData/POLAR/PWI/SFR.A.DS.P1D
Start:1996-03-25 00:00:00 Observatory:POLAR Cadence:
Stop:1997-09-16 17:00:00 Instrument:Polar Plasma Waves Investigation (PWI) Resource:DisplayData
The Polar Sweep Frequency Receiver-A (SFR-A) made use of either the Eu (130 m, spin-plane) or Ez (14 m, spin axis) two-sphere electric dipole antennas. Between March 25, 1996 and May 26, 1996, the Eu antenna was the default antenna, from May 27, 1996 through February 9, 1997 the Ez antenna was used and from February 10, 1997 until September 17, 1997 the SFR-A returned to using the Eu antenna. The SFR-A receiver spanned the frequency range from 26 Hz to 808 kHz in 5 bands: 26-200 Hz, 0.2 - 1.6 kHz, 1.7 - 12.6 kHz, 13-100 kHz, 100-808 kHz. Each image is a daily plot of the power spectral density (V^2 m^-2 Hz^-1) of received signal (color scale) as a function of operating frequency (in a logarithmic scale on vertical axis) and time (horizontal axis). At the top of each plot is a title indicating the Instrument, Receiver and Antenna used followed by the time span for the spectrogram. Beneath the time labels on the horizontal axis are ephemeris data: position of the spacecraft in radial distance (Earth radii), geomagnetic latitude, magnetic local time, and McIlwain L-shell. Overlaid on each image is a trace of the electron gyrofrequency.

45) Polar Plasma Wave Instrument, Sweep Frequency Receivers A and B - 2 sec resolution fields maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VWO/NumericalData/POLAR/PWI/SFR.AB.PT2S
Start:1996-03-25 00:00:00 Observatory:POLAR Cadence:2 seconds
Stop:1997-09-16 17:00:00 Instrument:Polar Plasma Waves Investigation (PWI) Resource:NumericalData
The PO_H1_PWI CDF files contain spectral densities of magnetic and electric field measurements from the Sweep Frequency Receiver-A and B. These files also contain correlation, electron cyclotron frequency, upper hybrid frequency and electron number density data. A full frequency sweep for the SFR takes about 33 seconds. From about 12.5 kHz to 800 kHz a full frequency spectrum can be obtained every 2.4 sec in the log mode. There are 224 SFR frequency bands, logarithmically spaced. When SFR_MODE is Linear, the 448 linear frequency bands are mapped to 224 logarithmic bands. The Polar Sweep Frequency Receiver-A (SFR-A) made use of either the Eu (130 m, spin-plane) or Ez (14 m, spin axis) two-sphere electric dipole antennas. Between March 25, 1996 and May 26, 1996, the Eu antenna was the default antenna, from May 27, 1996 through February 9, 1997 the Ez antenna was used and from February 10, 1997 until September 17, 1997 the SFR-A returned to using the Eu antenna. The SFR-A receiver spanned the frequency range from 26 Hz to 808 kHz in 5 bands: 26-200 Hz, 0.2 - 1.6 kHz, 1.7 - 12.6 kHz, 13-100 kHz, 100-808 kHz. The Polar PWI Sweep Frequency Receiver-B (SFR-B) collected data from March 1996 to September 1997. The SFR-B used the magnetic loop antenna (mounted on a 6m boom and oriented parallel to the Eu antenna). The SFR-B receiver spanned the frequency range from 26 Hz to 808 kHz in 5 bands: 26-200 Hz, 0.2 - 1.6 kHz, 1.7 - 12.6 kHz, 13-100 kHz, 100-808 kHz.

46) Polar PWI SFR-B Daily Dynamic Spectrograms maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VWO/DisplayData/POLAR/PWI/SFR.B.DS.P1D
Start:1996-03-25 00:00:00 Observatory:POLAR Cadence:
Stop:1997-09-16 17:00:00 Instrument:Polar Plasma Waves Investigation (PWI) Resource:DisplayData
The Polar PWI Sweep Frequency Receiver-B (SFR-B) collected data from March 1996 to September 1997. The SFR-B used the magnetic loop antenna (mounted on a 6m boom and oriented parallel to the Eu antenna). The SFR-B receiver spanned the frequency range from 26 Hz to 808 kHz in 5 bands: 26-200 Hz, 0.2 - 1.6 kHz, 1.7 - 12.6 kHz, 13-100 kHz, 100-808 kHz. Each image is a daily plot of the power spectral density (nT^2 Hz^-1) of received signal (color scale) as a function of operating frequency (in a logarithmic scale on vertical axis) and time (horizontal axis). At the top of each plot is a title indicating the Instrument, Receiver and Antenna used followed by the time span for the spectrogram. Beneath the time labels on the horizontal axis are ephemeris data: position of the spacecraft in radial distance (Earth radii), geomagnetic latitude, magnetic local time, and McIlwain L-shell. Overlaid on each image is a trace of the electron gyrofrequency.

47) STEREO WAVES (SWAVES) PDF Dynamic Spectrogram Plots both Ahead and Behind s/c maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VWO/DisplayData/STEREO/SWAVES/DS.Color.PDF.P1D
Start:2006-10-27 20:24:42 Observatory:STEREO A Cadence:1 minute
Stop:2016-05-19 13:23:47 Instrument:STEREO-A Waves (SWAVES) Resource:DisplayData
This dataset contains 24 hour duration dynamic spectrogram plots from the combined STEREO A and B Waves instrument. The plots are provided in several file formats (PNG, Postscript and PDF) and there are renditions in color and grayscale with and without additional lines of time series data indicating the instrument operating status. These plots all reside within the same directory structure subdivided by year. The "new" subdirectory contain plots at a higher resolution but currently are not available for dates early in the mission. These data consist of output from the SWAVES HFR and LFR receivers. ? the High Frequency Receivers (HFR) - for spectral analysis and direction finding of radio noise generated from a few solar radii (16 MHz) to about half an Astronomical Unit (125 kHz) ? the Low Frequency Receiver (LFR) - for spectral analysis and direction finding from about half an Astronomical Unit (160 kHz) to one AU (2.5 kHz).

48) STEREO WAVES (SWAVES) Radio Intensity Spectra, both Ahead and Behind s/c maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VWO/NumericalData/STEREO/SWAVES/DS.Combined.PT1M
Start:2006-10-27 20:24:42 Observatory:STEREO A Cadence:1 minute
Stop:2016-05-19 13:23:49 Instrument:STEREO-A Waves (SWAVES) Resource:NumericalData
The CDF file contains 1 minute averaged radio intensity data from both the Ahead and Behind s/c. A description of the STEREO/WAVES instrument is provided in: Bougeret, J.L, et al. (2008), S/WAVES: The Radio and Plasma Wave Investigation on the STEREO Mission, Space Science Reviews, 136, 487-528. The STEREO / WAVES (SWAVES) instruments provide unique and critical observations for all primary science objectives of the STEREO mission, the generation of CMEs, their evolution, and their interaction with Earth's magnetosphere. SWAVES can probe a CME from lift-off to Earth by detecting the coronal and interplanetary (IP) shock of the most powerful CMEs, providing a radial profile through spectral imaging, determining the radial velocity from ~2 RS (from center of sun) to Earth, measuring the density of the volume of the heliosphere between the sun and Earth, and measuring important in situ properties of the IP shock, magnetic cloud, and density compression in the fast solar wind stream that follows. SWAVES measures the fluctuation electric field present on three orthogonal monopole antennas mounted on the back (anti-sunward) surface of the spacecraft. Each monopole antenna unit is a 6 m long Beryllium-Copper (BeCu) ?stacer? spring. The three units deploy from a common baseplate that also accommodates the preamplifier housing. The 6 m length was chosen to put the antenna quarter-wave resonance near the top of the SWAVES HFR2 frequency band. These data consist of output from the SWAVES HFR and LFR receivers. ? the High Frequency Receivers (HFR) - for spectral analysis and direction finding of radio noise generated from a few solar radii (16 MHz) to about half an Astronomical Unit (125 kHz) ? the Low Frequency Receiver (LFR) - for spectral analysis and direction finding from about half an Astronomical Unit (160 kHz) to one AU (2.5 kHz).

49) Ulysses COSPIN/HET Daily Average Proton and Helium Fluxes in ASCII Format maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VEPO/NumericalData/Ulysses/COSPIN/HET/PH_Fluxes/P1D
Start:1990-10-23 00:00:00 Observatory:Ulysses Cadence:1 day
Stop:2009-06-30 23:59:59 Instrument:High Energy Telescope Resource:NumericalData
Daily average PHA-based proton and helium fluxes and errors from the COSPIN High Energy Telescope (HET) in the approximate energy ranges 39-70 MeV/n and 71-94 MeV/n from Day 296, 1990 through Day 181, 2009

50) Ulysses COSPIN/HET Ion and Electron 10-Minute Spin-Averaged Rate maxmize
Resource ID:spase://VEPO/NumericalData/Ulysses/COSPIN/HET/Rates/PT10M
Start:1990-10-22 00:00:00 Observatory:Ulysses Cadence:10 minutes
Stop:2015-08-19 13:22:18 Instrument:High Energy Telescope Resource:NumericalData
10-Minute average ion and electron spin-averaged coincidence counting rates from the COSPIN High Energy Telescope (HET). The parameter keys in the parameter-level segments below are specifically relevant to the UFA-accessible versions of the data.

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